loader from loading.io

Too Close for Comfort Does an Episode About Male Rape

Gayest Episode Ever

Release Date: 07/01/2020

Married With Children Lets Its Out Star Play Gay show art Married With Children Lets Its Out Star Play Gay

Gayest Episode Ever

It's another summer rerun! This time, of our 17th episode, which never really pulled in the numbers we thought it should. We swear it doesn't suck! “Lez Be Friends” (April 28, 1997) For many kids watching sitcoms in the 90s, Amanda Bearse would have been one of the first actors they would have known to be openly gay. That’s what makes this episode so special. She’d put in her time on Married… With Children season after season, playing Al Bundy’s sparring partner, Marcy D’Arcy. So it’s sweet that toward the end of the series, she got to play Marcy’s cousin Mandy, who is so...

info_outline
Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy Are Domestic Partners show art Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy Are Domestic Partners

Gayest Episode Ever

This is a summer rerun of an episode that originally aired July 30, 2018. We're posting not only because Harley and Ivy went from subtextual lovers to full on romantic partners on the HBO Max series but also because we've got a new Batman: TAS episode of Cartoons That Made Us Gay, which you can listen to . Excuse the echo! It was 2018 and we didn't know better! "Harley and Ivy" (January 18, 1993) In GEE’s first bonus episode, Glen and Drew focus on something that's not a sitcom but is nonetheless pretty damn gay — the Batman: The Animated Series installment that put a lesbianish aura...

info_outline
Sanford Arms Meets a Gay — And He’s Black! show art Sanford Arms Meets a Gay — And He’s Black!

Gayest Episode Ever

“Phil’s Assertion School (September 23, 1977) Sanford Arms was NBC’s attempt to continue the world of Sanford and Son without either Sanford or the Son. It didn’t work, and of the eight episodes produced, only four ever aired. That said, it’s second ever installment not only introduced a gay character but also it became the first black cast sitcom to ever do a gay episode with an out gay person of color. So while this attempt at a Sanford spinoff didn’t work, it still landed its place in history. We’re joined again by to discuss. Buy Alfred’s book, . Listen to . Watch this...

info_outline
Sanford Thinks His Son Is Gay (And Vice-Versa) show art Sanford Thinks His Son Is Gay (And Vice-Versa)

Gayest Episode Ever

It's our first-ever summer rerun! And we're doing this one in preparation for a full-length, main feed bonus episode next week, where we're talking about Sanford Arms, the sequel series to Sanford and Sun. Enjoy! “Lamont, Is That You?” (October 19, 1973) Norman Lear for the win! This podcast probably won’t go in depth on ’90s classics like Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Family Matters or A Different World because many black sitcoms of that era didn’t do gay episodes. Back in 1973, Sanford and Son did, however, and the result is classier and more interesting than what you’d see on shows...

info_outline
Al Borland Is a Model for the Modern American Gay Bear show art Al Borland Is a Model for the Modern American Gay Bear

Gayest Episode Ever

“Roomie for Improvement” (November 4, 1992) Al Borland is not gay. This episode makes a point of saying that he is a heterosexual, despite how many of his (comparatively) immasculine qualities might indicate otherwise. However for some, Richard Karn’s sensitive flannel man is an example of a kind of guy some of us would grow up to like and some of us would grow up to be: big, bearded, and free to be ourselves regardless of where on the gender spectrum we ended up being. joins Drew and Glen to discuss Home Improvement, one of the most successful shows this podcast has examined so far —...

info_outline
The Nanny Has Bad Gaydar show art The Nanny Has Bad Gaydar

Gayest Episode Ever

“A Fine Friendship” (February 6, 1995) One hundred episodes later, we return to The Nanny to find out what happens when Fran Fine mistakes a straight guy for a gay guy. This episode essnetially works as an inverse to we covered, right down to Fran being horrified by a gay-seeming person being straight rather than delighted by a straight-seeming person being gay.  Watch Matt Baume’s video on Watch on why The Nanny had a gay sensibility Read Brett White’s column Go shop at !   Follow: • • • • •   Listen: • • • • •   And yes, we do...

info_outline
NewsRadio Never Did a Gay Episode show art NewsRadio Never Did a Gay Episode

Gayest Episode Ever

“Halloween” (October 30, 1996) Considering that every other major Must See TV sitcom did at least one gay episode, it’s surprising that NewsRadio didn’t — especially when you consider the fact that its lead actor, Dave Foley, jumped straight to NBC from Kids in the Hall, which experimented with gender and sexuality a lot more freely. This episode was as close as we could find to a real gay episode. And while it does feature Dave Foley donning drag once again, there’s a lot more weird stuff going on, including Phil Hartman’s character getting a premonition of his own death —...

info_outline
Rosa Diaz Is Bi... And Brooklyn Nine-Nine Is Copaganda show art Rosa Diaz Is Bi... And Brooklyn Nine-Nine Is Copaganda

Gayest Episode Ever

“Game Night” (December 12, 2017) Right off the top of the bat, we need to admit that yes, Brooklyn Nine-Nine is a show about cops. There’s no getting around that. We try our best to discuss how to weight its copaganda status against every other aspect of the show, and while we’re not going to try to sell anyone on this show, we will say that dismissing it means skipping over one of the better episodes of a sitcom ever to address bisexuality head-on. Speaking of addressing bisexuality head-on, we’re joined by Queer Quadrant co-host to discuss the Michael Schurverse, Eleanor...

info_outline
Troy McClure Isn’t Gay, But… show art Troy McClure Isn’t Gay, But…

Gayest Episode Ever

“A Fish Called Selma” (March 24, 1996) In this episode, The Simpsons send up the glass closets of Hollywood and what some actors are willing to do to pass for “normal.” Troy McClure explicitly says he’s not gay, but the way the industry treats him for not fitting the leading man mold and what he does to find success anyway parallels what a lot of gay stars have done and what some are still doing.   Read: Listen: The You Must Remember This episodes about and Go shop at !   Follow: • • • • •   Listen: • • • • •  ...

info_outline
Trailer 3.0 show art Trailer 3.0

Gayest Episode Ever

It's just a new trailer, for promotional purposes. Please go about your day.

info_outline
 
More Episodes

Content warning: In this episode we talk about sexual assault.

“For Every Man, There's Two Women” (July 20, 1985)

This week, we’re not talking about an explicitly LGBT-focused episode of TV. No, we’re talking about the episode of Too Close for Comfort in which a male character, Monroe, is sexually assaulted by two women. No, really. Jim J. Bullock, the actor playing that character, is gay in real life, and because Monroe is coded as queer as well, this episode serves as a bizarre example of not just how a sitcom can handle a sensitive topic but also how some actors’ offscreen sexuality can color the way their performance is received and even how their characters get written. Jeffrey McCrann joins Drew and Glen to try and make sense of this strange, strange bit of TV history.

RAINN is an online organization that offers both information about sexual assault and counseling. You can chat live with a counselor here.

Have a listen to the episode of the Drew-Tony podcast You Have to Watch the Movie that Jeffrey guested on back in 2018. We talk about Fright Night. Much in the way Bullock’s offscreen sexuality informs this episode of TV, the queerness of Fright Night’s cast really changes the way that movie plays out.

This 2012 A.V. Club article on this episode is pretty much the best text trying to make sense of this episode. It also brought us to this interview with Jim J. Bullock on the website Guy Spy. Check out Old Time TV, without whose help we would not have been able to do this episode.

Behold the short-lived wonder of Jim J. and Tammy Faye.

And have a look at the David Lynch series Rabbits that Jeffrey mentions.

Here’s an explainer for how the movie Streets of Fire may have “inspired” elements in the video game Final Fight, which BTW is one of the most homoerotic games ever.

And here’s the weird bit with Roseanne and Freddy Krueger that makes it four — count ‘em FOUR — of the daughters from Just the Ten of Us who share screentime with Freddy. Weird, right?

Buy Glen’s movie, Being Frank.

Watch Drew’s weird video art project, GEE TV.

Support us on Patreon!

Follow: GEE on TwitterDrew on TwitterGlen on Twitter

Listen: iTunesSpotifyStitcher Google PlayGoogle Podcasts Himalaya TuneInSoundCloud

And yes, we do have an official website! And we even have episode transcripts courtesy of Sarah Neal. Our logo was designed by Rob Wilson.

This is a TableCakes podcast.

The outro for this episode is “Number of the Dancer” by Al Monroe, which isn’t on any of the online music services, but it is on YouTube if you want to hear it.