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Emergency Edition: Insurrection at the Capitol

The Lawfare Podcast

Release Date: 01/07/2021

January 6 Oversight with No Bull show art January 6 Oversight with No Bull

The Lawfare Podcast

The Senate Homeland Security Committee and the Senate Rules Committee held their second hearing to examine the January 6 attack on the Capitol. Four officials testified: Melissa Smislova, Jill Sanborn, Robert Salesses and Major General William Walker. What explains the delay in deploying National Guard troops? What reforms are the agencies planning to implement in order to better handle the threat posed by domestic extremist violence? And why was the intelligence reporting late and insufficient?

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Emily Bell on Journalism in the Platform Era show art Emily Bell on Journalism in the Platform Era

The Lawfare Podcast

Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Emily Bell, who testified before Congress last week about the role of legacy media in spreading disinformation. They talked about the relationship between online and offline media in spreading disinformation, the role different institutions need to play in fixing what’s broken and whether all the talk about “fighting misinformation” is a bit of a red herring.

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Chris Wray vs. the Committee with No Bull show art Chris Wray vs. the Committee with No Bull

The Lawfare Podcast

FBI Director Christopher A. Wray faced the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday to talk about the January 6 riot and insurrection. The hearing covered whether the FBI had intelligence that the riot was planned for January 6 and how it communicated what it knew to the Capitol Police and the Metropolitan Police, as well as topics from SolarWinds to diversity at the FBI. We cut out all of the nonsense and all of the repetitive questions to bring you only what you need to hear.

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Rosa Brooks on American Policing show art Rosa Brooks on American Policing

The Lawfare Podcast

In 2016, Georgetown law professor Rosa Brooks—already a successful scholar of national security law and a former official in the Department of Defense—joined Washington, D.C.'s volunteer Police Reserve Corps as a sworn police officer. She has chronicled that experience in her new book, "Tangled Up in Blue: Policing the American City." Alan Rozenshtein spoke with Brooks about her time in law enforcement, the structural challenges facing police in the United States and the prospects for reform.

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Your Questions on Iraq show art Your Questions on Iraq

The Lawfare Podcast

The United States hit targets in Syria associated with two Iraqi militias last week in the first military operations of the Biden administration. To catch up on the situation on the ground in Iraq, Benjamin Wittes sat down on Lawfare Live with Scott Anderson and Marsin Alshamary. They talked about the groups that the U.S. attacked, the constellation of forces in the current Iraqi government, the legal authority for the attack and where Iraqi politics go from here.

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Mary Anne Franks on Section 230 show art Mary Anne Franks on Section 230

The Lawfare Podcast

Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act of 1996 has been called by some the Magna Carta of the internet—but how foundational is it? Mary Anne Franks thinks that Section 230 is indeed a cornerstone of the modern internet, but not in a good way. Alan Rozenshtein spoke with her about her recent paper, "Section 230 and the Anti-Social Contract," in which she argues that far from expanding freedom, Section 230 has simply continued a long tradition of marginalizing the most vulnerable among us.

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Rasmus Kleis Nielsen on Australia, Facebook and the Future of Journalism show art Rasmus Kleis Nielsen on Australia, Facebook and the Future of Journalism

The Lawfare Podcast

Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Rasmus Kleis Nielsen about the fight between Australia and Facebook. After Australia proposed a law that would force Facebook to pay for content linked on its platform from Australian news sites, Facebook responded by blocking any news posts in the country. The company and the Australian government have since resolved the spat—for now—but the dust-up raises bigger questions about the relationship between traditional media and social media platforms.

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Merrick Garland vs. the Judiciary Committee with No Bull show art Merrick Garland vs. the Judiciary Committee with No Bull

The Lawfare Podcast

Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland faced the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday for a multi-hour session of questions and answers from senators. There were opening statements, there was a lot of speechifying, and there was posturing on the part of senators of both parties. We stripped it all out to bring you just the questions and the answers with no repetition.

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Alex Klass on the Texas Energy Crisis show art Alex Klass on the Texas Energy Crisis

The Lawfare Podcast

Texas has been struggling with a massive power outage caused by record low temperatures; millions have been without power, heat and running water, and at least dozens have died. Texas is unique in that its electricity is almost completely independent from the rest of the U.S. grid, and as the current crisis shows, Texas's energy exceptionalism comes at a cost. Alan Rozenshtein spoke with Alexandra Klass about the current situation and the future of energy policy, both for Texas and for the United States.

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Trust, Software and Hardware show art Trust, Software and Hardware

The Lawfare Podcast

David Hoffman is associate general counsel and global privacy officer for the Intel Corporation, as well as the Steed Family Professor of Practice in Cybersecurity Policy for Duke's Sanford School of Public Policy. He invited Benjamin Wittes to give a talk to a group of students about trust and technology development in which they discussed what the components of trust really are, how many of them are technical and how many of them involve other things like corporate governance.

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More Episodes

Today a mob of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol following a rally at which the president spoke. Congressional efforts to count the electoral votes were suspended, and an armed standoff, in which at least one person was killed, ensued. To discuss the matter, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Lawfare managing editor Quinta Jurecic; Lawfare chief operating officer David Priess; Georgetown's Mary McCord, who used to run the National Security Division at the Justice Department; and Daniel Byman, a professor at Georgetown and Lawfare's foreign policy editor.