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Tactical Nutrition

On The Line

Release Date: 09/04/2017

Athletic Training show art Athletic Training

On The Line

Athletic trainers (AT’s) are health care professionals who specialize in the prevention and care of injuries. While they’re a familiar presence in sporting environments, they do not have a large footprint working with tactical populations. Although the U. S. military has begun to hire more of them, wildland fire has not followed suit. Yet. Dr. Valerie Moody from the University of Montana Athletic Training Education Program and Athletic Trainer Bella Callis join the podcast to talk about the profession.

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Mountain Pine Beetle show art Mountain Pine Beetle

On The Line

Although only about the size of a mouse turd, Dendroctonus ponderosae, also known as the Mountain Pine Beetle, has been responsible for what is being called the largest insect blight ever recorded in North America. Millions and millions of trees have been killed through infestation, which has led to massive forest ecosystem changes. Dr. Diana Six from the University of Montana’s joins the podcast to share her world renowned expertise about this fascinating creature.

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Sack Lunches show art Sack Lunches

On The Line

19th Century American bars would often times offer a “free lunch” as an attempt to entice drinking customers in to their establishments. The catch was that patrons usually had to purchase at least one drink, and often times the foods served were high in salt content, thus leading to more thirst and higher beer sales. In response, economists of the era created there ain’t no such thing as a free lunch. Wildland fire has its own version of the free lunch.

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Drones show art Drones

On The Line

After the podcast episode “Smart and Smarter” came out during Season 2 of On The Line (with guest Drs. LLoyd Queen and Carl Seielstad) firefighter/scientist Casey Teske provided us with some awesome feedback when she suggested we also talk with the guys about drones. Casey, thanks for the great idea! We got one of them (Carl) along with another National Center for Landscape Fire Analysis employee, the uber talented Tim Wallace, to tell us about drones...

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Running show art Running

On The Line

Running. It’s part of the fire culture. Whether it’s to stay in shape, to prepare for the pack test, or just for enjoyment, firefighters run, and far. Yet, how well does running translate to the specific job duties of the wildland firefighter, and what are some strategies for running injury-free?University of Montana professors Matt Bundle and Chuck Dumke join the podcast to answer these questions, and many others. Check it out!

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The Other Half show art The Other Half

On The Line

Relationships are tough enough as it is to maintain successfully. With wildland firefighters, factors like unpredictable work schedules, absences, and communication challenges due to remote work environments can complicate matters even more. And yet, beside many firefighters stand strong, resilient partners who are able to successfully navigate these challenges. Smokejumper wives Korey Wolferman and Tobi Kearns join the podcast to talk about what life is like for “the other half.”

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Transitions show art Transitions

On The Line

Transitions can be a challenging time, whether they be when a fire is changing classification type, or when firefighters are moving into retirement. Recently retired Missoula Smokejumpers Mitch Kearns and Keith “Skid” Wolferman join the podcast to talk about how the retirement process went for them. They also weigh in on mentoring and leadership, and Skid brings listeners up to speed on his upcoming D-Day re-enactment jump into Normandy.

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CISM show art CISM

On The Line

This is it, the tenth and final podcast of Season 2. Critical Incident Stress Management, or CISM, is a process designed for helping those who have experienced traumatic events be able to share their perspectives with others, learn about common stress reactions, express emotions, and obtain information about follow up assistance that might be available. Heath Cota from the Forest Service and Asad Rahman from the BLM join the podcast to share their perspectives about CISM.

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Senator Jon Tester show art Senator Jon Tester

On The Line

After a somewhat lengthy Season 2 hiatus, “On The Line” is back with a brand new podcast. United States Senator Jon Tester from the state of Montana joins the program from Washington, D. C. to talk about the importance of funding for wildland fire, what is happening right now in DC that might be relevant to firefighters, and how those of us involved in wildland fire can better work together to support the health and safety of our nation’s first responders.

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Jose's Bag 2.0 show art Jose's Bag 2.0

On The Line

The original Jose’s Bag podcast had such stellar and rave reviews (fake news?), that we are back with another installment. In Jose’s Bag 2.0, Luke Alford from the University of Montana’s Health and Human Performance Department steps in for Jose, and he is joined by host Charlie Palmer and UM exercise physiologist/sport nutritionist Dr. Chuck Dumke to examine and discuss four items: coffee, Copenhagen, Vitamin C, and coconut oil.

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More Episodes

Firefighters can expend upwards of 6200 calories per day during rigorous operations. Therefore, what they eat, when they eat, and how much they eat become extremely important factors that must be taken in to consideration by not only the firefighters themselves but also fire managers. Dr. Brent Ruby, director of the Montana Center for Work Physiology and Exercise Metabolism and professor in UM’s Health and Human Performance Department, joins the podcast to discuss this critically important topic. This podcast, the first in a two part series on nutrition, focuses primarily upon the food demands faced by firefighters while they are operational. The second part of the series, which will air in Season Two of “On the Line”, will concentrate on the role of nutrition in recovery.

 

This podcast was made possible in part through support from the U. S. Forest Service and the University of Montana.
The University of Montana is an equal opportunity provider.