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#228 - Quote or No Quote: Chief Seattle | We Do Not Inherit the Earth from Our Ancestors; We Borrow It from Our Children

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Release Date: 09/18/2017

The Novels of Anna Lee Huber - Fiction Friday! show art The Novels of Anna Lee Huber - Fiction Friday!

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Historical novelist Anna Lee Huber gives us a glimpse of what it's like to be a historical novelist. She discusses her famous Verity Kent series (set in Britain during the WWI period) and her Lady Derby series (set in 1830s Britain). It's a Fiction Friday and let's have fun!! Episode 414

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Mary Ware Dennett - Woman Crush Wednesday! show art Mary Ware Dennett - Woman Crush Wednesday!

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Mary Ware Dennett was an American women's rights activist, pacifist, and pioneer in the areas of birth control, sex education, and women's suffrage. Yet, she is largely unknown to the general public. So, she’s our Woman Crush Wednesday this week! Listen as historian Sharon Spaulding explains Mary’s important life and work! Episode 413.

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Mother's Day show art Mother's Day

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Major social and political forces led to the establishment of Mother's Day as a major and official holiday. This episode explains those forces, and also tells us who founded Mother's Day. Was it Julia Ward Howe with her famous "Appeal to Womanhood" Peace Proclamation in 1870? Or did Anna Marie Jarvis found it, honoring her own mother in 1908? And what did war and campaigns for international disarmament have to do with the history of Mother's Day? Episode 412

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Dinner in Camelot: When Art, Literature, and Science Mattered in the United States show art Dinner in Camelot: When Art, Literature, and Science Mattered in the United States

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Joseph Esposito tells us about “the night America’s greatest scientist, writers, and scholars partied at the White House in April 1962." We discuss this glittering event, including the untold stories of controversy, protest, and personality clashes before, during, and after the famous dinner. It's a fascinating look at the workings of the social side of the Kennedy White House, and also how this dinner became mythologized in the Kennedy-Camelot legend. Episode 411.

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Gun Violence in the US and the History of the NRA - Encore show art Gun Violence in the US and the History of the NRA - Encore

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

This encore episode from 2019 explains how the National Rifle Association become one of the most controversial and divisive organizations in American history. The NRA was once a sportsmen’s group. Since the 1970s, however, it has taken a very strict view of the US Constitution’s Second Amendment, and has gone to extremes in its defense of gun ownership. We explain how and why this happened, and dispel historical and cultural myths along the way.

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Income Tax and Inequality in US History - Encore show art Income Tax and Inequality in US History - Encore

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Income tax is a troubling issue in American politics and history. We explain its long and complicated history, and delve into the even more complicated history of how personal income tax has related to the question of equality and inequality in US society. Professor Nash tells us how the American government has raised funds for peacetime needs and, of course, times of war. It’s not a simple tale of taxes rising as the country grew and the US government grew. Taxation is perhaps the most difficult thing to explain in American governmental history, but we make it easy to understand.

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Immigration and The Deportation Machine in the United States show art Immigration and The Deportation Machine in the United States

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Professor Adam Goodman explains the unknown history of deportation and of the fear that shapes immigrants' lives in the modern United States. He explains how federal, state, and local officials have targeted various groups for expulsion, from Chinese and Europeans at the turn of the twentieth century to Central Americans and Muslims today. A very timely show! Episode #410

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Woman Crush Wednesday: Qiu Jin - Encore! show art Woman Crush Wednesday: Qiu Jin - Encore!

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

It’s a rare thing indeed to find someone in history who stands up and rebels against almost all the things she finds oppressive in society. Such a woman was Qiu Jin, the Chinese revolutionary whose short but dramatic life has led her to be called “China’s Joan of Arc.” She rebelled not only against the strictures placed on her as an individual, but also against the broader restrictions and repression against women in Chinese society in politics and society in the early 20th century. A great woman for a Woman Crush Wednesday!

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Warfare, Technology, Constitutions, and the Making of the Modern World show art Warfare, Technology, Constitutions, and the Making of the Modern World

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Professor Linda Colley gives us the first full integrative, as well as literary, examination of the written constitution globally. Tracing their rise to the mid-eighteenth century and the emergence of hybrid warfare (cross-continental battles waged on land and at sea), constitutions addressed a growing concern for rulers during the Enlightenment: popular support. Episode #409.

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Gloria Steinem Gloria Steinem "A Woman Needs a Man Like a Fish Needs a Bicycle" Quote or No Quote?

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

The number of different images and different sayings or phrases printed on t-shirts exploded in the early 70s. And one of the most striking was the t-shirt from the women’s rights movement which said, "A Woman Needs a Man Like a Fish Needs a Bicycle," most famously worn by the feminist champion, Gloria Steinem. Did she coin the saying? We explain the history behind that great phrase.

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More Episodes

As a parting piece of wisdom about generational stewardship of land and nature, Chief Seattle supposedly said to American colonizers pushing west, "we do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children." But, like spiritual quotes that get attached to Gandhi, political quips and gibes that get attributed to Churchill, and thoughtful sentiments that drift toward Martin Luther King, there's no evidence that Seattle ever said it. Listen and learn who did, Buzzkillers!