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+1: #975 The Tenth of an Inch

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Release Date: 12/06/2019

+1: #1059 Your Most Profitable Journey show art +1: #1059 Your Most Profitable Journey

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

In our last +1, we hung out with a couple of Zenos—Emerson’s leopard gecko and the founder of Stoicism. Side note: Every single time I look at our gecko I feel like I’m looking backwards in time. 

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The Alter Ego Effect with Todd Herman show art The Alter Ego Effect with Todd Herman

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

The Alter Ego Effect. This is one of the most fun and compelling and inspiring books I’ve read in awhile. I REALLY (!!!) enjoyed reading it, had a ton of fun constructing and playing with some potential Alter Egos and highly recommend it.

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+1: #1050 Galileo on Optimizing show art +1: #1050 Galileo on Optimizing

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

In our last couple +1s, we’ve been hanging out with Emerson, playing the “I Love You!” game and taking a quick look at the story of our world.

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+1: #1045 What’s 1 + 1? show art +1: #1045 What’s 1 + 1?

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

In our last +1, we had fun with the ultimate riddles of life—from skunks and giraffes to watches and pearls. And… The answer to pretty much all of life’s riddles? Love.

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Optimize Interview: Irresistible with Adam Alter show art Optimize Interview: Irresistible with Adam Alter

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Irresistible. That’s the perfect word to describe the growing array of addictive technologies that are capturing so much of our attention these days.

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Optimize Interview: The Psychology of Possibility with Ellen Langer show art Optimize Interview: The Psychology of Possibility with Ellen Langer

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Ellen Langer is a professor of psychology at Harvard and one of the world's leading experts on the science of wellbeing, and what she refers to as the "psychology of possibility."

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+1: #1035 Yesterday’s Home Run show art +1: #1035 Yesterday’s Home Run

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

In our last +1, we spent some time with John Maxwell and reflected on his wisdom on the pinnacle of leadership influence: Moral Authority.

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+1: #1030 Want to Make It Stick? show art +1: #1030 Want to Make It Stick?

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

We’re going to consult with Barbara Oakley on this one. Barbara taught one of the most popular classes in history. Nearly 2 million people from 200 countries have taken her Coursera class called Learning How to Learn.

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+1: #1025 Exercise: It’s a Well-Being Tool show art +1: #1025 Exercise: It’s a Well-Being Tool

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

In our last couple +1s, we talked about a key (arguably the #1 key) predictor of our long-term health/morbidity: our visceral fat. 

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+1: #1020 Learning Cycles show art +1: #1020 Learning Cycles

OPTIMIZE with Brian Johnson | More Wisdom in Less Time

Today we’ll step back a bit and put in an AM Intention practice to go with that PM Reflection practice.

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More Episodes
We talk a lot about the futility of arguing with reality.
 
As Byron Katie so perfectly says, “When I argue with reality I lose. But only 100% of the time.” (Hah.)
 
Today we’re going to take another look at that wisdom from a slightly different angle.
 
We’ll invite a couple of modern Zen Masters to the party: Joko Beck and Phil Jackson.
 
We’ll start with legendary basketball coach Phil Jackson’s wisdom. In his book Sacred Hoops, he tells us: “In Zen it is said that the gap between accepting things the way they are and wishing them to be otherwise is ‘the tenth of an inch of difference between heaven and hell.’ If we can accept whatever we’ve been dealt—no matter how unwelcome—the way to proceed eventually becomes clear. This is what is meant by right action: the capacity to observe what’s happening and act appropriately, without being distracted by self-centered thoughts. If we rage and resist, our angry, fearful minds have trouble quieting down sufficiently to allow us to act in the most beneficial way for ourselves and others.”
 
Thank you, Phil.
 
Now for Joko Beck. In Everyday Zen, she tells us: “If we require that life be a certain way, inevitably we suffer—since life is always the way it is, and not always fair, not always pleasant. Life is not particularly the way we want it to be, it is just the way it is. And that need not prevent our enjoyment of it, our appreciation, our gratitude.”
 
That’s Today’s +1.
 
When/if we find ourselves a little (or a lot annoyed) Today—whether that’s with our kids or our colleagues or ourselves—let’s see if we can step back and notice the gap between what’s happening in the moment and what we want to be happening in the moment.
 
That tenth of an inch?
 
Let’s close it.
 
-1. -1. -1. for the +1 win!
 
P.S. If you’re getting all crazy-ragey? Well, you just fell into a mile-long chasm between reality and your fantasy of what should be happening. Good news? Just snap your fingers, love what it is and that gap magically vanishes.