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What a Year

K12Science

Release Date: 12/23/2020

Touch, Talk, Text show art Touch, Talk, Text

K12Science

I was recently reading the November/December 2021 issue of “Science & Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read an article entitled “Touch, Talk, Text” written by Sarah J. Carrier, Jill F. Grifenhagen, and Danielle Scharen.  They wrote an article entitled “Touch, Talk, Text.” Traditional approaches to science instruction often include reading science text, some hands-on science experiences, and teaching science language in isolation.  They propose instead that teachers integrate touch, talk, and...

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The Language of Science show art The Language of Science

K12Science

I was recently reading the November/December 2021 issue of “Science & Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section “Editor’s Note” written by Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn.  Elizabeth wrote an article entitled “The Language of Science.” The language of science is much more than just knowing technical or content-specific words or phrases.  Understanding science requires the development of an academically social language. Students need opportunities to see how language can be used to describe,...

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Nature's Notebook show art Nature's Notebook

K12Science

I was recently reading the November/December 2021 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section “Citizen Science” written by Jill Nugent.  Jill wrote an article entitled “Taking the Pulse of Our Planet with Nature’s Notebook.” Nature’s Notebook, a project of the USA National Phenology Network, invites participants to help scientists “take the pulse of our planet.”  With Nature’s Notebook, your students will have the opportunity to observe, document, and share...

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The Importance of Professional Development show art The Importance of Professional Development

K12Science

I was recently reading the November/December 2021 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section “From the Editor’s Desk” written by Patti McGinnis.  Patti wrote an article entitled “The Importance of Professional Development.” Professional Development is best conducted via opportunities to learn in the workplace through Professional Learning Communities, instructional coaching, or any vehicle that focuses on improving student achievement through teacher practices.

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Soil Scientist show art Soil Scientist

K12Science

I was recently reading the September/October 2021 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association. In this issue, I read the section “Career of the Month” written by Luba Vangelova.  Luba wrote an article entitled “Soil Scientist.” Soil scientists study the soil, for the purpose of understanding it in its natural state, or in its capacity to serve human purposes.  The podcast features Janes Hartsig, a soil scientist working in the role of vegetation manager, an Invenergy LLA in Denver, Colorado.

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Tricky Energy Terminology show art Tricky Energy Terminology

K12Science

I was recently reading the September/October 2021 issue of “Science & Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section “Science 101” written by Matt Bobrowsky.  Matt wrote an article entitled “What is Energy?” Energy is one of those scientific terms that is commonly used outside of science and outside of the classroom with a variety of colloquial meanings.  This is another case where students don’t enter the classroom as blank slates but come with preconceptions about what energy means. ...

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Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning show art Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning

K12Science

I was recently reading the September/October 2021 issue of “Science & Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section “Editor’s Note” written by Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn.  Elizabeth wrote an article entitled “Three-Dimensional Teaching and Learning.” One of the most important starting points when implementing three-dimensional teaching and learning is the placement of students within the learning environment.  Are students the drivers of the learning, or are they passive recipients of a...

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Stream Tracker show art Stream Tracker

K12Science

I was recently reading the September/October 2021 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association. In this issue, I read the section “Citizen Science” written by Jill Nugent.  Jill wrote an article entitled “Stream Tracker Science.” Stream Tracker is a citizen science project that is helping to fill gaps in our understanding of intermittent streams, or streams that do not have continuous water flow throughout the year.  For more information on the project, visit:

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Spoiler Alert! show art Spoiler Alert!

K12Science

I was recently reading the September/October 2021 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section “Teacher’s Toolkit” written by Daniel J. Bergman.  Daniel wrote an article entitled “Spoiler Alert! Avoiding Hazards to Science Inquiry and Classroom Creativity.” Spoilers can infiltrate our classrooms.  Science education “spoilers” are elements or behaviors that sabotage, short-circuit, and short-change the learning process and student creativity.  Here is a listing...

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Creativity in the Science Classroom show art Creativity in the Science Classroom

K12Science

I was recently reading the September/October 2021 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section “From the Editor’s Desk” written by Patty McGinnis.  Patty wrote an article entitled “Creativity in the Science Classroom.” Students learn science—and use critical and creative thinking—by doing science.  Rather than focusing on memorizing facts, they are engaged in application in which they apply content knowledge to real-world situations.

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I was recently reading the November/December 2020 issue of “Science and Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Editor’s Note” column written by Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn.  Her article was entitled “What a Year.”

As we move toward the early winter of 2020 we look back at schools following a patchwork of face-to-face, hybrid, and virtual models of instruction.  All teachers, at whatever grade-level, have been returned to their “rookie year” of teaching as they struggle to find ways to meet the needs of learners in their physical classrooms and on screens.