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Land Loss Lookout

K12Science

Release Date: 03/22/2022

Chemical Puns show art Chemical Puns

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Idea Bank” column, written by Nick Thomas.  He wrote an article entitled, “Chemicals Gone Funny.” Using humor in the classroom at any level can be a gamble for teachers and most have probably experienced students collectively rolling their eyes at a corny joke.  Puns, of course, frequently elicit that response along with the almost requisite group groan.  Yet this ancient and simple...

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Inclusive Science Classrooms show art Inclusive Science Classrooms

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Editor’s Corner” column, written by Ann Haley MacKenzie.  She wrote an article entitled, “Inclusive Strategies for the Science Classroom.” The time is now for more attention to be paid to providing an inclusive environment for all learners.  Our STEM pipeline depends on it.  Our future as a progressive scientific country depends on it.  Our scientific literacy depends on...

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Do Students Work Like Scientists? show art Do Students Work Like Scientists?

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science and Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Science 101” column, written by Matt Bobrowsky.  He wrote an article entitled, “What Makes a Great Science Investigation?” Real-world science doesn’t involve a series of steps, and there’s not always a single correct answer.  Real science is exploration and discovery and lots of fun!  Scientific investigations are open-ended and can keep being extended or expanded, so too is learning an...

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Augmented Reality and the WWF Free Rivers App show art Augmented Reality and the WWF Free Rivers App

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science and Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association. In this issue, I read the “Tech Talk” column, written by Heather Pacheco-Guffrey.  She wrote an article entitled, “Using Augmented Reality to Augment Inquiry (and Fun!) in Your Lessons.” Technology has the potential to extend students’ reach into the world around them, increase their access to concepts and resources, and help to make learning fun and memorable.  Augmented reality (AR) is just such a...

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Finding Inspiration as the School Year Winds Down show art Finding Inspiration as the School Year Winds Down

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science and Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association. In this issue, I read the “Editor’s Note” column, written by Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn.  She wrote an article entitled, “Finding Inspiration as the Year Winds Down.” This is the time of the year when teachers need a boost of energy or inspiration to help finish the school year.  One way of finding that boost of energy is to create space for large-scale investigations and in-depth activities where the students are in the...

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Mark My Bird! show art Mark My Bird!

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.   In this issue, I read the “Citizen Science” column, written by Jill Nugent.  She wrote an article entitled, “Mark My Bird!” Mark My Bird is a global online citizen science project associated with the University of Sheffield that invites participants to study the how and why of bird biodiversity and change over time by studying bird bills.  For more information, please visit:

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Equity in the Science Classroom show art Equity in the Science Classroom

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “From the Editor’s Desk” column, written by Patty McGinnis.  She wrote an article entitled, “Equity in the Science Classroom.” Despite advances in science education, there remains an opportunity gap; historically underperforming populations often opt out of advanced courses and are not equitably represented in the STEM fields.  As teachers, we are tasked with closing this gap through practices...

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Cool Water show art Cool Water

K12Science

I was recently reading the March/April 2022 issue of “Science & Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the Science 101 column, written by Matt Bobrowsky.  He wrote an article entitled, “What’s Cool About Water?” Water is a good example to use when discussing how matter can be in different states — solid, liquid, or gas.  Students are quite familiar with solid water and liquid water but gaseous water is a bit more abstract.  Bubbles in boiling water are made of water vapor (gaseous...

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The Ocean show art The Ocean

K12Science

I was recently reading the March/April 2022 issue of “Science & Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the Formative Assessment column, written by Page Keeley.  She wrote an article entitled, “Uncovering Student Ideas About Earth’s Defining Feature: The Ocean.” Earth’s ocean is the defining feature of our planet.  Principle #1 of the “Ocean Literacy Framework” states the Earth has one big ocean with many features.  But research shows that both children and adults believe a...

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Water In Our World show art Water In Our World

K12Science

I was recently reading the March/April 2022 issue of “Science & Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the Editor’s Note column, written by Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn.  She wrote an article entitled, “Water In Our World.” Water is critical whether we are floating in canoes, learning about waterfowl habitats, saving a local swamp, or building weather models.  With over 2 billion people struggling to find safe drinking water access, the topic remains one of the most critical issues of this century.

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I was recently reading the March/April 2022 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the section, “Citizen Science,” written by Jill Nugent.  She wrote an article entitled, “The Land Loss Lookout Project.” 

Land Loss Lookout is a citizen science project from Healthy Gulf and Northeastern University designed to monitor land loss in the Mississippi River Delta region.  Students can help categorize wetland impact patterns by looking at color infrared aerial images online.  For more information, please visit the project’s website at: https://healthygulf.org/get-involved/contact