loader from loading.io

Chemical Puns

K12Science

Release Date: 06/22/2022

Energy Literacy show art Energy Literacy

K12Science

I was recently reading the July/August 2022 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association. In this issue, I read the Editor’s Corner, written by Patty McGinnis.  She wrote a column entitled, “Energy Literacy.”   The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) defines energy literacy as “an understanding of the nature and role of energy in the world and daily lives accompanied by the ability to apply this understanding to answer questions and solve problems.”

info_outline
Teaching Societal Issues show art Teaching Societal Issues

K12Science

I was recently reading the July/August 2022 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the Editor’s Corner, written by Ann Haley MacKenzie.  She wrote a column entitles, “Teaching Societal Issues in the Science Classroom.”   By incorporating societal issues into our classrooms, we provide students a chance to explore topics in depth, instead of simply glossing over the content.  Here are some reasons to include societal issues in science courses: --These issues justify information...

info_outline
Bridging the Informal-Formal Science Education Divide show art Bridging the Informal-Formal Science Education Divide

K12Science

I was recently reading the June 23, 2022 issue of “NSTA Weekly” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the NSTA Blog feature “With, Not For: Why the Distinction Matters” written by Beth Murphy.   It is important to foster collaboration between organizations and schools, providing professional learning experiences for educators, and implementing program evaluation that supports practitioners to do their best work.  Collaboration provides the opportunity to bridge the informal-formal science education divide. ...

info_outline
Railway Engineer show art Railway Engineer

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Career of the Month” column, written by Luba Vangelova.  She wrote an article entitled, “Railway Engineer.” Railway engineers design and maintain rail systems used by trains of various types, ranging from long-distance cargo trains to metropolitan light-rail and subway trains.  Cassie Gouger is senior director of design within Union Pacific Railroad’s engineering department, in Omaha,...

info_outline
Chemical Puns show art Chemical Puns

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Idea Bank” column, written by Nick Thomas.  He wrote an article entitled, “Chemicals Gone Funny.” Using humor in the classroom at any level can be a gamble for teachers and most have probably experienced students collectively rolling their eyes at a corny joke.  Puns, of course, frequently elicit that response along with the almost requisite group groan.  Yet this ancient and simple...

info_outline
Inclusive Science Classrooms show art Inclusive Science Classrooms

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Editor’s Corner” column, written by Ann Haley MacKenzie.  She wrote an article entitled, “Inclusive Strategies for the Science Classroom.” The time is now for more attention to be paid to providing an inclusive environment for all learners.  Our STEM pipeline depends on it.  Our future as a progressive scientific country depends on it.  Our scientific literacy depends on...

info_outline
Do Students Work Like Scientists? show art Do Students Work Like Scientists?

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science and Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Science 101” column, written by Matt Bobrowsky.  He wrote an article entitled, “What Makes a Great Science Investigation?” Real-world science doesn’t involve a series of steps, and there’s not always a single correct answer.  Real science is exploration and discovery and lots of fun!  Scientific investigations are open-ended and can keep being extended or expanded, so too is learning an...

info_outline
Augmented Reality and the WWF Free Rivers App show art Augmented Reality and the WWF Free Rivers App

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science and Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association. In this issue, I read the “Tech Talk” column, written by Heather Pacheco-Guffrey.  She wrote an article entitled, “Using Augmented Reality to Augment Inquiry (and Fun!) in Your Lessons.” Technology has the potential to extend students’ reach into the world around them, increase their access to concepts and resources, and help to make learning fun and memorable.  Augmented reality (AR) is just such a...

info_outline
Finding Inspiration as the School Year Winds Down show art Finding Inspiration as the School Year Winds Down

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science and Children” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association. In this issue, I read the “Editor’s Note” column, written by Elizabeth Barrett-Zahn.  She wrote an article entitled, “Finding Inspiration as the Year Winds Down.” This is the time of the year when teachers need a boost of energy or inspiration to help finish the school year.  One way of finding that boost of energy is to create space for large-scale investigations and in-depth activities where the students are in the...

info_outline
Mark My Bird! show art Mark My Bird!

K12Science

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “Science Scope” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.   In this issue, I read the “Citizen Science” column, written by Jill Nugent.  She wrote an article entitled, “Mark My Bird!” Mark My Bird is a global online citizen science project associated with the University of Sheffield that invites participants to study the how and why of bird biodiversity and change over time by studying bird bills.  For more information, please visit:

info_outline
 
More Episodes

I was recently reading the May/June 2022 issue of “The Science Teacher” a publication of the National Science Teaching Association.  In this issue, I read the “Idea Bank” column, written by Nick Thomas.  He wrote an article entitled, “Chemicals Gone Funny.”

Using humor in the classroom at any level can be a gamble for teachers and most have probably experienced students collectively rolling their eyes at a corny joke.  Puns, of course, frequently elicit that response along with the almost requisite group groan.  Yet this ancient and simple form of humor can effectively impart a message if carefully worded, although any attempt at a science pun relies on the teacher first ensuring students understand the scientific principles tied to the humor.