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Autoimmune & Tick Borne Illness

PodcastDX

Release Date: 01/26/2021

Sarcoidosis show art Sarcoidosis

PodcastDX

In this episode we will discuss Sarcoidosis with Frank Rivera. Frank is the Founder and President of   is a WEGO Health Patient Leader, a Patient Ambassador at Illumina Inc, and a volunteer Patient Ambassador at The Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research. ​Sarcoidosis is a disease characterized by the growth of tiny collections of inflammatory cells (granulomas) in any part of your body — most commonly the lungs and lymph nodes. But it can also affect the eyes, skin, heart and other organs. The cause of sarcoidosis is unknown, but experts think it results from the body's immune system...

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Organ Donation show art Organ Donation

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Every day, gifts from donors restore health to save and improve lives. As of 2019, 165 million people in the U.S. have registered as donors, but we all need to sign up. There are still      men, women, and children waiting for a life-saving organ transplant.   ​Organ donation takes healthy organs and tissues from one person for  into another. Experts say that the organs from one donor can save or help as many as 50 people. Organs you can donate include Internal organs: Kidneys, heart, liver, pancreas, intestines, lungs Skin Bone and bone marrow Cornea ...

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Tinnitus show art Tinnitus

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Do you hear a constant sound in your ears, even though there is no external source linked to the noise? If so, you’re likely suffering from tinnitus, and you aren’t alone. It’s estimated that more than 50 million Americans suffer from some degree of tinnitus, 16 million Americans experience such severe ringing that they require some type of treatment, and another 2 million suffer from such debilitating tinnitus that it impacts their daily lives. ​ Tinnitus is marked by phantom-like ringing, roaring, hissing, buzzing, or clicking noise; in other words, the sound can be heard, yet...

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von Hippel-Lindau Chuvash Polycythemia show art von Hippel-Lindau Chuvash Polycythemia

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Our guest this week is Shannon Wyatt.  Shannon has an extremely rare condition called von Hippel-Lindau Chuvash Polycythemia (we will abbreviate to VHL).  Her only symptom that led to finding VHL was that she was diagnosed with kidney cancer at 34 years old, that didn’t even have any noticeable symptoms, it was just an incidental finding on an MRI, but when they took it out, they found it was malignant. A few years later, it was pulmonary embolisms in both lungs after a routine gallbladder removal that pointed to Chuvash Polycythemia after many previous labs had raised suspicion of...

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Bleeding Disorders show art Bleeding Disorders

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  Bleeding Disorders, also known as Hemophilia, von Willebrand Disease, Coagulation Disorders, Blood Clotting Disorders, Clotting Factor Deficiencies ​Bleeding disorders are rare disorders affecting the way the body controls blood clotting. If your blood does not clot normally, you may experience problems with bleeding too much after an injury or surgery. This health topic will focus on bleeding disorders that are caused by problems with clotting factors, including hemophilia and von Willebrand disease. Clotting factors, also called coagulation factors, are proteins in the blood that...

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Trisomy show art Trisomy

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Trisomy is an abnormality in which an organism has the wrong number of chromosomes. In humans, a normal baby will have 46 chromosomes in 23 pairs, with each parent contributing 23 chromosomes. When trisomy occurs, the individual is born with three instances of a particular chromosome instead of the usual two, resulting in 47 total chromosomes instead of 46. The results of this extra data can vary, but tend to manifest in the form of birth defects, some of which can be quite severe. The most common cause of trisomy is a problem in the duplication of chromosomes to create egg and sperm cells....

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Lysosomal Storage Disease show art Lysosomal Storage Disease

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Lauren, is here speaking with us today about Lysosomal Storage Disease.  Lauren has four siblings whom she loves dearly, and graduated in 2011.  She worked at a community center until COVID put a hold on social gatherings. She considers herself a social person and is grateful for the chance to get her story out into the world. ​ Lysosomal storage diseases are inherited metabolic diseases that are characterized by an abnormal build-up of various toxic materials in the body's cells as a result of enzyme deficiencies. There are nearly 50 of these disorders altogether, and they may...

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Muscular Dystrophy show art Muscular Dystrophy

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This week we are speaking with a Muscular Dystrophy Warrior!   Keisha Greaves is a motivational speaker, the founder of Girls Chronically Rock, and the Massachusetts State Ambassador for the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Girls Chronically Rock (www. girlschronicallyrock.com) offers inspired fashion celebrating Muscular Dystrophy and other chronic illnesses. Over the past few years, Keisha has been featured in Good Morning America, Today Show, WCVB Chronicle, ABC News, Thrive Global, Politico, Improper Bostonian, Boston Voyager, Herself 360, Liz on Biz, among other outlets on and...

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Rare Disease CAMK-2 Gene show art Rare Disease CAMK-2 Gene

PodcastDX

Our guest today is Karen is a wife and mother to 5 children.  Her youngest, who is now 13 was born seemingly healthy.  In her first weeks it became clear that she wasn't developing normally. After 10 years of looking for a diagnosis and not finding answers, they decided to do whole exome sequencing.  That finally gave them an answer.  She has a mutation of her CAMK2 gene. It was so newly discovered that only a handful of people were diagnosed with this.  Since it has been discovered, more children are being found to be in the family of CAMK2 mutations.  It is so...

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Effects of Agent Orange show art Effects of Agent Orange

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Tara Parham, the daughter of a disabled USMCS Veteran, eighty-sixed her 6 figure income career in Government Healthcare and Lean Six Sigma, after falling ill with the first of 3  rare diseases that are associated with her dads exposure to Agent Orange, a dioxin used while he was serving in the Vietnam War. Her goal is to shed light on those who are struggling with the many debilitating conditions from Agent Orange and other Rare Diseases; to advocate for  those who are struggling to find Help, their voice, and are unable to advocate for themselves.  TRANSCRIPT s8e10- PodcastDx-...

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Board Certified in Family Medicine, Dr. Kelley was among the first physicians to become Board Certified in Integrative Medicine. She has studied the causes, effects, and treatments of Lyme Disease extensively, and lectures nationally on this and other topics. 

Dr. Kelley

Dr. Kelley graduated from The Ohio State University College of Medicine and completed her residency in Family Medicine at St. Joseph Hospital in Chicago.  She is a ten-year member of the Institute of Functional Medicine (IFM), a Director on the board of The International Lyme and Associated Disease Society (ILADS), and is a Founding Member of the Academy of Integrative Health and Medicine (AIHM).  Dr. Kelley is on the faculty at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.  

Prior to founding Case Integrative Health, Dr. Kelley practiced medicine at WholeHealth Chicago, Michigan Avenue Immediate Care, and St. Joseph Hospital.

In the United States, some ticks carry pathogens that can cause human disease, including:

  • Anaplasmosis is transmitted to humans by tick bites primarily from the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.
  • Babesiosis is caused by microscopic parasites that infect red blood cells. Most human cases of babesiosis in the U.S. are caused by Babesia microtiBabesia microti is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and is found primarily in the northeast and upper midwest.
  • Borrelia mayonii infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the upper midwestern United States. It has been found in blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Borrelia mayonii is a new species and is the only species besides B. burgdorferi known to cause Lyme disease in North America.
  • Borrelia miyamotoi infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the U.S. It is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and has a range similar to that of Lyme disease.
  • Bourbon virus infection has been identified in a limited number patients in the Midwest and southern United States. At this time, we do not know if the virus might be found in other areas of the United States.
  • Colorado tick fever is caused by a virus transmitted by the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni). It occurs in the the Rocky Mountain states at elevations of 4,000 to 10,500 feet.
  • Ehrlichiosis is transmitted to humans by the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found primarily in the southcentral and eastern U.S.
  • Heartland virus cases have been identified in the Midwestern and southern United States. Studies suggest that Lone Star ticks can transmit the virus. It is unknown if the virus may be found in other areas of the U.S.
  • Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern U.S. and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.
  • Powassan disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the groundhog tick (Ixodes cookei). Cases have been reported primarily from northeastern states and the Great Lakes region.
  • Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis is transmitted to humans by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum).
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is transmitted by the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sangunineus) in the U.S. The brown dog tick and other tick species are associated with RMSF in Central and South America.
  • STARI (Southern tick-associated rash illness) is transmitted via bites from the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found in the southeastern and eastern U.S.
  • Tickborne relapsing fever (TBRF) is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected soft ticks. TBRF has been reported in 15 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming and is associated with sleeping in rustic cabins and vacation homes.
  • Tularemia is transmitted to humans by the dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Tularemia occurs throughout the U.S.
  • 364D rickettsiosis (Rickettsia phillipi, proposed) is transmitted to humans by the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis ticks). This is a new disease that has been found in California. (credits to the CDC for these links)

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