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He Condemned Sin in the Flesh: The Law and Union with Christ

Reformed Forum

Release Date: 10/17/2019

Pliny the Younger and Worship in the Ancient Church show art Pliny the Younger and Worship in the Ancient Church

Reformed Forum

What was worship like in the early church? Did it differ significantly from our present practices? A letter written by a Roman official in 112 AD provides a window into these ancient Christian liturgical practices. Pliny the Younger was appointed governor of Bithynia in 111 AD by the Emperor Trajan (98–117). Trajan knew that there was social unrest in that province, with a growing number of political factions causing divisions within the city. Among other things, he tasked Pliny with dissolving all associations or clubs in service of keeping the peace. This led him into a quandary...

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The More Excellent Way show art The More Excellent Way

Reformed Forum

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The fifth of these sermons is on 2 Corinthians 3:18, “The More Excellent Way.”

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Warfield's Doctrine of Inspiration show art Warfield's Doctrine of Inspiration

Reformed Forum

In 1894, B. B. Warfield published an article in which he compared the views of the Westminster divines and the Reformers on the mode of inspiration. According to Warfield, the Reformers argued for a mode of concursus while the Protestant Scholastics argued for dictation. Dr. Jeff Stivason analyzes this characterization, speaking to Warfield's historical context and his understanding of progressive orthodoxy. Jeff Stivason is pastor of (RPCNA) in Gibsonia, Pennsylvania and professor-elect at in Pittsburgh. His article, "Is Warfield's Claim True that Calvin is Better than Westminster on...

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Seeking and Saving the Lost show art Seeking and Saving the Lost

Reformed Forum

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The third of these sermons is on Luke 19:10, “Seeking and Saving the Lost.”

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Worship and Ecclesiology While Stuck at Home show art Worship and Ecclesiology While Stuck at Home

Reformed Forum

In this special quarantine episode, we discuss the theological issues and lessons learned from the initial weeks of staying at home during the global COVID-19 health crisis. Though many Christians are prevented from gathering physically to worship on the Lord's Day, the Lord has promised that his church shall never perish. While our worship practices may be irregular for a time, God has provided means by which he cares for his people. https://vimeo.com/400106693

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All That Is in God show art All That Is in God

Reformed Forum

James Dolezal discusses his book (Reformation Heritage Books, 2017). serves as associate professor in the school of divinity at in Langhorne, Pennsylvania. In this conversation, and the book that guides it, Dolezal addresses the doctrines of classical theism as well as contemporary models of theology proper, which reject, compromise, or otherwise diminish the classical formulations. Interacting with primary sources from theologians such as Bruce Ware, John Frame, and K. Scott Oliphint, Dolezal charitably offers a critique while reaffirming that all that is in God is God. ...

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The Kingdom of God and the Fall show art The Kingdom of God and the Fall

Reformed Forum

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob continue discussing the kingdom of God as it unfolds through the four-fold estate of man: the estate of innocence, fall, redemption, and glory. This week, the Fall.

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Echoes of Exodus show art Echoes of Exodus

Reformed Forum

Dr. Bryan Estelle joins us to speak about (IVP Academic, 2018). Israel’s exodus from Egypt is the Bible’s enduring emblem of deliverance. It is the archetypal anvil on which the scriptural language of deliverance is shaped. More than just an epic moment, the exodus shapes the telling of Israel’s and the church’s gospel. Estelle traces the motif as it unfolds throughout Scripture. is professor of Old Testament at in Escondido, California. He is also the author of . He has contributed essays to  and . https://vimeo.com/391337751  

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Vos Group #61: The Mode of Communication of the Prophecy show art Vos Group #61: The Mode of Communication of the Prophecy

Reformed Forum

We turn to pages 230–233 of Vos’s book, , to speak about the mode by which the Lord delivers his message to the prophet. Man is made in the image of God, which means he has a special capacity to commune with God. Vos marvels at the way in which divine speech is transmitted to those made in his image. God's word is communicated in servant form without evacuating the message of any of its divine characteristics, such as inerrancy or infallibility. The Holy Spirit works in the prophet in such a way as to inspire and superintend the entire activity of the prophet—whether in speech or...

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The Kingdom of God show art The Kingdom of God

Reformed Forum

Dr. S. M. Baugh joins us to speak about his book, . Beginning with a definition of the kingdom of God based on the new creation, Baugh introduces the reader to the kingdom and its foundational issues. is professor of New Testament at Westminster Seminary California in Escondido, California. He is also the author of (EEC). https://vimeo.com/391096097

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Camden Bucey speaks at our 2019 Theology Conference held at Hope OPC in Grayslake, Illinois. The theme of the conference is “The Law Is Spiritual,” which is a phrase that comes from Romans 7:14. This is a verse that has been a perennial challenge for interpreters. What does it mean for the law to be “spiritual”? In this opening lecture, Dr. Bucey offers several exegetical, hermeneutical, and biblical-theological suggestions for approaching this difficult verse and its immediate context, namely Romans 7. This is a sketch of what could be developed in due course.

There is a typological and eschatological difference post-Pentecost. This is a fundamental point of Paul’s epistle to the Galatians. There is deep congruence between Galatians’ structure and that of Romans. It is interesting to compare the flow of Paul’s argument in Galatians with that of Romans. If that is true, you should be able to look to one letter for assistance when the other is particularly difficult to understand. Romans 7 is one of those chapters, particularly with regard to the so-called “schizophrenic I.”[1] When Paul uses the first-person singular pronoun, what does he mean?

The ancient
church held the view that Paul was referring to himself when he was an
unbeliever. The Augustinian and Reformational tradition viewed it as the
struggle of a believer battling with indwelling sin in this age. Others have
argued for a redemptive-historical view that Paul describes life under the Old
Covenant.

We will
consider consider the hypothesis that Romans 7:14a is explained in part by
Galatians 3:19 and Galatians 3:22–24 sheds light on Romans 7:14b. The struggle
of Romans 7 is that of the earthly/dust (χοϊκός) man (1 Corinthians 15:47–48). The law originates from heaven
and guides us as a pedagogue unto the precipice just as Moses brought the
people to the Jordan. But to cross over into the promised land, we need the man
of heaven, the life-giving Spirit. Once there, we can offer the obedience of
faith (Romans 1:5), which was the goal of the law in the first place (Romans
8:4).


[1] See Dennis Johnson’s chapter in Resurrection and Eschatology: Essays in Honor of Richard B. Gaffin, Jr.