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The Playboy Riots

Three Castles Burning

Release Date: 04/25/2022

Dónal Lunny: From Emmet Spiceland to Kate Bush show art Dónal Lunny: From Emmet Spiceland to Kate Bush

Three Castles Burning

There are few careers in Irish music as extraordinary as that of Dónal Lunny. His name will forever be connected with the groups Emmet Spiceland, Planxty, The Bothy Band and Moving Hearts. Yet beyond being a defining musician, he has made important contributions on the other side of the sound desk too. In this discusssion, recorded at Another Love Story, we pass through some of the greatest Irish albums of the twentieth century. Three Castles Burning: A History of Dublin in Twelve Streets is available now with free P&P from:...

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Jim Fitzpatrick: On Che, Phil Lynott and Sinéad O'Connor show art Jim Fitzpatrick: On Che, Phil Lynott and Sinéad O'Connor

Three Castles Burning

A real privilege to talk to an artist who first emerged in the 1960s, and who is still making fantastic work today. Any discussion with Jim Fitzpatrick passes through subjects as diverse as Harry Clarke, Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, Phil Lynott, Sinéad O'Connor and the world of Marvel. Recorded at the Electric Picnic, thanks to those of you who came along. This episode touches on some serious issues including the Dublin bombings, the Troubles and addiction. Visuals can be viewed on Instagram at @threecastlesburning, on Twitter @fallon_donal and on Patreon. Jim's work: 'Three Castles Burning' with...

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From Jim Larkin to Alfred Hitchcock: The Life of O'Casey show art From Jim Larkin to Alfred Hitchcock: The Life of O'Casey

Three Castles Burning

Seán O'Casey had a turbulent relationship with the Abbey Theatre. Now, his Dublin trilogy is back on the stage of the national theatre. Championed with his arrival on the stage in 1923, and denounced in 1926 with The Plough and the Stars, O'Casey remains one of the most inspirational figures of twentieth-century Irish theatre. Did you know that Alfred Hitchcock tried his hand at bringing O'Casey to the world of cinema?  TCB book with free P&P in Ireland: https://www.kennys.ie/shop/three-castles-burning-a-history-of-twelve-dublin-streets-donal-fallon-9781848408722 TCB Patreon:...

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Peig McManus: A Dublin Childhood and a Life Less Ordinary show art Peig McManus: A Dublin Childhood and a Life Less Ordinary

Three Castles Burning

Peig McManus was born into a life in tenement Dublin in the late 1930s. In subsequent decades, she became one of Ireland's most recognisable voices for educational reform. In her brilliant memoir, I Will Be Good: A Dublin Childhood and a Life Less Ordinary, she talks about her childhood, her time in school, her activism over many decades and the various campaigns for educational reform. Recorded live at 14 Henrietta Street.   Peig's book: https://chaptersbookstore.com/products/peig-mcmanus-i-will-be-good-2023-paperback Teatime Talks:...

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"My body to Ireland, my heart to Rome...." (with Claire Halpin)

Three Castles Burning

The body of Daniel O'Connell is at rest in Glasnevin Cemetery, an institution with which he is eternally linked. His heart? Well, that has been something of a mystery. Dublin artist Claire Halpin joins me this week to talk about her recent show in Rome, and a little intervention she made into the question of just what happened to the heart of 'The Liberator'.

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The Foggy Dew: From Father O'Neill to Sinéad O'Connor show art The Foggy Dew: From Father O'Neill to Sinéad O'Connor

Three Castles Burning

This episode is dedicated to the memory of Sinéad O'Connor. The Foggy Dew is in itself a historic document. Written in 1919, this story of the Easter Rising and the contrasting World War has gone around the world. This episode of the podcast explores the song and its meaning, and how it came to bring together the incredible talents of The Chieftains and Sinéad O'Connor.   

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From Lugs Branigan to Led Zeppelin show art From Lugs Branigan to Led Zeppelin

Three Castles Burning

The National Stadium on the South Circular Road has witnessed some really incredible nights. To some, it is the home of Irish boxing, a story that's connected to the sporting history of the Gardaí as well as the endless enthusiasm of the Irish Amateur Boxing Association. To others, it is a gig venue which recalls names like Planxty, Led Zeppelin and Leonard Cohen. Thanks for your memories!

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Motorcades and Martyr Graves show art Motorcades and Martyr Graves

Three Castles Burning

In June 1963, President John F. Kennedy arrived into a city in crisis. As Dublin tenements seemed to be collapsing to the touch, the visit of a U.S President was a welcome distraction. In some ways, it was a distraction for him, too. History recalls New Ross, but in Dublin there were significant moments, captured brilliantly by reporters and writers like the poet Louis MacNeice.  Support TCB: www.patreon.com/threecastlesburning

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Roddy Doyle Interview: Taxi to Barrytown! show art Roddy Doyle Interview: Taxi to Barrytown!

Three Castles Burning

Sincere thanks to the Dalkey Book Festival for the invitation to interview Roddy Doyle. This was a chance to talk about things as diverse as Maeve Brennan, the impact of the 1974 Dublin bombings, Myles na gCopaleen and more. A language warning on this one.

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1954: The Birth of Bloomsday show art 1954: The Birth of Bloomsday

Three Castles Burning

Bloomsday as we know it owes its existence to Brian O'Nolan, otherwise Myles na gCopaleen, otherwise Flann O'Brien. In 1954, he was the catalyst for gathering together a number of Dublin McDaidsian types who embarked on an epic journey of their own in honour of Leopold Bloom, Buck Mulligan and the cast of Ulysses. They didn't make it too far.

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