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#123 Dr. Cassandra makes the show disappear

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Release Date: 11/14/2019

#137 Yvonne Craig: We get a kick out of this memoir show art #137 Yvonne Craig: We get a kick out of this memoir

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Yvonne Craig’s memoir, From Ballet to the Batcave and Beyond, poses quite a contrast to those by Adam West and Burt Ward. Batman takes up much less space in it, and recountings of sexual adventures take up no space at all. What emerges is a very practical woman who sees herself as a geek, is surprised to find herself typecast as “sexy” as she approaches 40, has plenty of amusing anecdotes (Hollywood-related and otherwise), and would be a joy to sit down to coffee with. We’ve read the book and we review it in this episode. Also, we present audio of ten minutes of Yvonne’s 1967...

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#136 Freeze/Penguin teamup and Dozier's ten rules show art #136 Freeze/Penguin teamup and Dozier's ten rules

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Penguins live where it’s cold, but somehow the pairing of the Penguin and Mr. Freeze never came about on the TV show. But Jeff Parker made it happen in the second issue of the Batman ’66 comic book! In the same issue, he gave us another logical pairing, Chandell and the Siren. This time, we review the issue. Also, we take a closer look at the , which laid out ten rules of thumb for the making of the show. Were all the points good ideas, and were they adhered to over the run of the show? PLUS: , winners of the “Joker’s Utility Belt” D’oh Prize, and your response to our discussion...

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#135 Batman ’66 Comics, the Gray Ghost, and Nostalgia show art #135 Batman ’66 Comics, the Gray Ghost, and Nostalgia

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

This episode: BECAUSE YOU DEMANDED IT! We discuss two topics often suggested by listeners: In 2013, not long before Batman finally came to home video, DC Comics began the Batman '66 comic book series with Jeff Parker and Jonathan Case's "The Riddler's Ruse." In a comic whose main reason for existence is nostalgia, is it forgivable to take advantage of the comics medium to do things the TV show never could have? Does the art invoke nostalgia - and if so, is it the right kind? Then we consider the 1992 episode from the first season of Batman: The Animated Series, "", featuring the voice of Adam...

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#134 What’s My Crime? Bob Dozier’s Joker Drafts show art #134 What’s My Crime? Bob Dozier’s Joker Drafts

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Scripts are back! After many months resting our script-research muscles, we're back to tackle the first two drafts of Robert Dozier's The Joker is Wild — originally called The Joker's Utility Belt, after the comics story the script is based on. Oddly, this first draft seems to also have scenes that are based on Lorenzo Semple's Hi Diddle Riddle! Holy carbon copy! As usual, draft first-season batscripts tell us much about the show finding and defining itself, and also help us notice some imperfections in the broadcast episode that we hadn't realized were there. They also lead us to a mini...

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#133 Scott Sebring is here! Holy Bat-cyclopedia! show art #133 Scott Sebring is here! Holy Bat-cyclopedia!

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Hey Batfans! Want details on what kept the show out of home video for so long? Want to know where the building called Gotham Plaza was, and what other shows that same structure was used for? Wondering about the background on the missing narration at the start of Hi Diddle Riddle? Have questions about the history of the all-seeing, all-knowing 66 Batman message board? There's only ONE MAN (OK, maybe two men) we can call: Scott Sebring! He joins us this time to discuss all this and more. "We do know when we need him… and we need him now!" Then Tim presents a Bat Research Lab study that...

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#132 Women of Season One: Not Just #132 Women of Season One: Not Just "Poor, Deluded Girls"

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

TV in the '60s was, of course, dominated by male characters. It'd be tough to find a series that would pass the "Bechdel Test." How does Batman fare from a woman's point of view in the year 2020? To help us investigate this question, we invited novelist Nancy Northcott to join us this time and screen selected episodes from the first season. Plus, Tim and Paul have identified five "rules" for how women (molls in particular) are portrayed on the show. Also, "Bat Attack '89" (a Keaton-cash-in-cover of Hefti's Batman theme), and your mail on episode 129 "The Show's Ratings, and Rating...

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#131 1970: Batman goes solo and gets spooky show art #131 1970: Batman goes solo and gets spooky

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

The 1964 "New Look" facelift and, of course, our beloved 1966 TV show created a boom in Batman comics... briefly. The sales numbers dropped to their lowest point yet after the show was cancelled. Meanwhile, diehard fans of the comics, whose vision of Batman couldn't have been farther from how he was portrayed on the show, were fed up and demanding a darker version of the character, a return to his roots. These fans, many of whom read, and wrote for, the Batmania fanzine, were cheering for the darker look that new artist Neal Adams was giving the Caped Crusader in The Brave and the Bold....

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#130 Reading Fan Letters in the Wayne Living Room show art #130 Reading Fan Letters in the Wayne Living Room

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

In 1966, one sure way to make money was to tie your product to the Batman TV show in some way. Bill Adler was an expert at riding the latest wave, and in that year he released Bill Adler's Funniest Fan Letters to Batman, a collection of real (?) fan letters sent by fans (mostly kids) of the Caped Crusader's TV show and comic books. In this episode, we discuss this book and read some of our favorite letters from it. Then Ben Bentley of 66batman.com (AAA-aa, AAA-aa) stops by to fill us in further on last episode's question regarding the similarities of various "living room" sets from the show,...

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#129 The Show's Ratings, and Rating #129 The Show's Ratings, and Rating "Godzilla"

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

At last, we're back! Week-to-week Neilsen ratings info isn't easy to come by, but some research on the ratings has been shared on the all-seeing, all-knowing 66 Batman message board by Bob Furmanek. This time we examine Bob's research and how it puts another nail in the bat-coffin of the pervasive fourth season myth. Also in this episode: A prince getting weighed? Holy Deja Vu! A review of the first issue of Your mail reacting to our season three wrapup episode Stills of Bruce Wayne, Karnaby Katz, and Lord Ffogg's living rooms - are they all the same set? (Sure looks like it!...

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BAT-ANNOUNCEMENTS show art BAT-ANNOUNCEMENTS

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Tim and Paul explain why the next episode will be delayed a bit. Also, how you can put yourself in a drawing to win a !

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More Episodes

Cassandra and Cabala

As Batman neared the end of its run, the budget situation got worse (occasioning the need for an invisible fight), and the writers threw caution to the wind: witness at least half a dozen double entendres in "The Entrancing Dr. Cassandra" — this at a time when most viewers who were old enough to get these naughty jokes had already bailed. In this episode, we examine this, this final episode written by Stanley Ralph Ross.

PLUS: Lily Munster has a deja vu episode, John Burgess sends us his own take on Hefti's Batman theme, and we read your mail about our discussion of the Dynamic Duo on The Adventures of Superman radio show!

The 1966 LP More Official Adventures of Batman and Robin, on Discogs.com

"When Batman Became a Coward" from that same 1966 LP

Ronald Liss bio on superman.fandom.com

Down These Mean Streets discusses "The Case of the Drowning Seal"

John Burgess plays a Batman Theme-like tune in one of his guitar rebuild videos

The other appearances of The Purple Top

Cassandra and Cabala

Leslie Perkins, as Octavia, is the first to wear it, in The Minstrel's Shakedown/Barbecued Batman?

Cassandra and Cabala

Then Phyllis Douglas, as Josie, takes her turn in The Joker's Last Laugh/The Joker's Epitaph.