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Episode 089 - Sibling Complexes

This Jungian Life

Release Date: 12/12/2019

Episode 163 - INTROVERSION show art Episode 163 - INTROVERSION

This Jungian Life

The terms introversion and extraversion, now cultural staples, originated with Jung and describe the overall direction of life energy. The widely used Myers-Briggs Typology Indicator (MBTI), now available online, is drawn directly from Jung’s theory of personality types. Although extraverts direct their energy outward, introverts direct their energy inward. External-world relationships and events tend to pale in comparison to ideas, internal images and reflective processes.

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Episode 162 - Tending the Ego-Self Axis: Reconnecting with Source show art Episode 162 - Tending the Ego-Self Axis: Reconnecting with Source

This Jungian Life

Erich Neumann publicly proposed the concept of the ego-Self (or Self-ego) axis and began to sketch its implications in his 1952 Eranos lecture, "The Psyche and the Transformation of the Reality Planes. Edward Edinger popularized the concept writing, "It portrays the developmental relationship between the ego and the Self, Jung’s term for “the totality of the conscious and unconscious psyche [that] transcends our visions…”

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Episode 161 - When Words Lose Their Meaning show art Episode 161 - When Words Lose Their Meaning

This Jungian Life

We are joined on the podcast by Dr. Bret Alderman, author of Symptom, Symbol, and the Other of Language: A Jungian Interpretation of the Linguistic Turn. He discusses with us the alienation and dissociation that results when we engage in a Promethean project to deconstruct language and its meaning. 

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Episode 160 - The Dark Side of Mothering show art Episode 160 - The Dark Side of Mothering

This Jungian Life

Our colleague Puddi Kullberg, author of The Bad Mother, joins us to acknowledge motherhood’s shadow. A link to her paper is below. Our culture idealizes motherhood, but mothers everywhere have experienced themselves as bad in varying ways and to various degrees.

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Episode 159 - The Alchemy of Writing show art Episode 159 - The Alchemy of Writing

This Jungian Life

The wellspring of consciousness has long been located in word. Once words were etched on clay or inked on papyrus, a new way of knowing was born. Writing ordered and expanded language, captured ideas, bloomed imagination, and preserved human experience.

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Episode 158 - The Phoenix: Life’s Transformative Fires show art Episode 158 - The Phoenix: Life’s Transformative Fires

This Jungian Life

The splendid-feathered phoenix lives for hundreds of years, builds its own funeral pyre, sets it on fire, and rises from the ashes after three days. The phoenix represents long life, conscious acquiescence to death, and assured regeneration. The fiery alchemical process of calcinatio leaves behind a white ash equivalent to salt, that which cannot be burned: life, soul, and Eros.

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Episode 157 - The Archetype of the Fool show art Episode 157 - The Archetype of the Fool

This Jungian Life

The fool in various guises has appeared since ancient times. The court jester seduces through comedy, song and story. The dummling son of fairy tales wins the treasure with well-meaning ineptitude. Shakespeare featured fools in many of his plays, the Tarot deck begins (or ends) with the fool, and comedians have built careers on playing the fool.

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Bonus Episode - MILKMAID REVELATIONS:  JUNG’S EROTIC STAMP COLLECTION show art Bonus Episode - MILKMAID REVELATIONS: JUNG’S EROTIC STAMP COLLECTION

This Jungian Life

Swiss Jungian scholar Jager Schmallzenburger has recently released news of the discovery of Jung’s erotic stamp collection. Found tucked into the wall behind a bookcase, the box of stamps features provocatively rendered images of milkmaids from countries around the world. The milkmaid, symbolic of the archetypal feminine in the flower of fulsome youth, has long been prominent in the mythopoetic imagination of man.

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Episode 156 - Exile & Alienation show art Episode 156 - Exile & Alienation

This Jungian Life

Exile and alienation could be considered the external and internal aspects of rejection. Exile is not chosen, but is imposed and unwanted: a relational break-up, job lay-off, or deportation. Exile can affect the human spirit so powerfully that the ancient Romans used it as an alternative to execution. Alienation describes an internal state of deadness and despair--an uncanny valley that feels featureless, gray, and unending.

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Episode 155 - A Comedian Walks into a Jungian Podcast… show art Episode 155 - A Comedian Walks into a Jungian Podcast…

This Jungian Life

Elliott Morgan, comedian and PhD candidate in depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute, joins us to explore humor and psyche. Elliott grew up a fundamentalist Christian in central Florida, and has gone from practicing holy laughter to creating HOLY SH*T, his comedy special on Amazon (also featuring Jung’s debut on the comedic stage).

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Siblings are embedded in the human psyche as they are in life. Even if one lacks siblings, there is ready access to them through friends, fairy tales, myths, and scripture. All feature multiple experiences and examples of sibling solidarity and siblings as shadow carriers. Birth order, sex, temperament, and the quality of parental presence play a part in constellating the intense polarities of sibling relationships: competition and cooperation, admiration and envy, hierarchy and partnership, aggression and intimacy. We often carry the dynamics of early sibling relationships into adult life and project them onto individuals, work teams or social groups. Jung used the alchemical image of the soror mystica and the adept to represent a relational ideal, whether externally between self and other or internally between ego and unconscious. Each must have a respectful and equal say, from collaboration to confrontation. 

 

Dream

In my dream, I visited a pet shop to buy a snake. I had my dog with me. I looked around the store and couldn't find any reptiles, so I asked the staff and one of the employees told me they kept them in a separate room. He had no face and reminded me of a jailer as he carried a bunch of keys with him. The old wooden door we approached didn't match the rest of the store, which was very modern, friendly and light. As he unlocked the door, my dog tried to get in with us but I told her to wait outside. The room on the other side seemed to have no ceiling or visible end and was more like a dungeon or cave. On the right hand side from the door there was a wooden outdoor rabbit cage with six compartments. It was too dark to see the animals but I could hear some sizzling and strangely humming noises and saw that all of their skins had different patterns in black and white. The man asked me if I wanted to hold one and before I could say anything he opened one of the boxes and gave me a smaller snake. It felt warm and lively in my hands and I enjoyed holding it. I couldn't see its head, so I tried to get a closer look and as I held it closer to my face it started biting my hand a couple of times though it didn't really hurt and even if it did strike before every bite they felt more like it was just nibbling a bit. The man asked me if I was okay and I laughed and told him that I was not afraid of snakes. I handed it back to him and decided that I didn't really need a snake as a pet. As I opened the door to get back, my dog was excited to see me and I petted her for a while at the threshold. Through the open door some bright light fell on the cage and I looked back and finally got a closer look at the snakes. They were all sleeping and still making humming sounds, rolled up as snakes do but their heads looked like those of rabbits with no ears.

 

References (books available on Amazon) 

Newton, Lara. Brothers and Sisters: Discovering the Psychology of Companionship.

Fairy Tales: The Children of Lir, Six Swans.

Conroy, Pat. The Prince of Tides.

Jahren, Hope. Lab Girl

Film: Winged Migration