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Third Party Litigation Funding: A New Gold Rush?

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Release Date: 03/24/2020

Brian Gallant | 33rd Premier of New Brunswick | CEO, Canadian Centre for the Purpose of the Corporation show art Brian Gallant | 33rd Premier of New Brunswick | CEO, Canadian Centre for the Purpose of the Corporation

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Today’s guest is one that you won’t want to miss: Brian Gallant, 33rd premier of New Brunswick and current CEO of the Canadian Centre for the Purpose of the Corporation. Mr. Gallant has a fascinating journey, from student and lawyer to politician and premier, and now to advisor and CEO. Over the course of this episode, he discusses each step on his path to making a difference, and how every lawyer can play a role in promoting social change.

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Reconciliation and the Legal Field with Senator Murray Sinclair show art Reconciliation and the Legal Field with Senator Murray Sinclair

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Today’s episode features a very special guest: Senator Murray Sinclair. His groundbreaking career has had a significant impact on the Canadian legal landscape, from his appointment as the first Indigenous judge in Manitoba and only the second in Canada to his service as Co-Chair of the Aboriginal Justice Inquiry in Manitoba and as Chief Commissioner of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

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Climate Change and Constitutional Litigation: A New Era? show art Climate Change and Constitutional Litigation: A New Era?

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

As the effects of climate change continue to be felt across the globe, litigants have attempted to hold governments accountable through constitutional challenges. To explore this emerging area, we speak with Dennis van Berkel, legal counsel to the Urgenda Foundation in its historic case against the Dutch government, as well as Dayna Nadine Scott, associate professor at York University and York Research Chair in Environmental Law & Justice in the Green Economy.

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Article Preview: Familles, inégalités et droit dans un espace mondialisé show art Article Preview: Familles, inégalités et droit dans un espace mondialisé

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Pour notre dernier épisode lié au Volume 64:2 de la Revue de droit de McGill, Dr. Ivana Isailović donne un aperçu de sa recension critique, intitulé « Familles, inégalités et droit dans un espace mondialisé ».

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Article Preview: Property Law and Collective Self-Government show art Article Preview: Property Law and Collective Self-Government

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

To coincide with Volume 64:2 of the McGill Law Journal, the MLJ Podcast has been publishing bite-sized bonus episodes where you can hear directly from authors about their work. In this episode, Professor Malcolm Lavoie discusses his new article, “Property Law and Collective Self-Government.”

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Article Preview: Le droit à l’égalité et l’accès aux professions réglementées show art Article Preview: Le droit à l’égalité et l’accès aux professions réglementées

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Pour souligner le lancement du Volume 64:2 de la Revue de droit de McGill, nous publions de courts épisodes où les auteurs présenteront un aperçu de leur article. Aujourd’hui, Me Frédérick Doucet décrit l’article qu’il a coécrit avec Me Geneviève St-Laurent, intitulé ≪ Le droit à l’égalité et l’accès aux professions réglementées : bilan contrasté de la jurisprudence canadienne ≫.

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Article Preview: Who’s Afraid of the Lucky Moose? Canada’s Dangerous Self-Defence Innovation show art Article Preview: Who’s Afraid of the Lucky Moose? Canada’s Dangerous Self-Defence Innovation

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

To coincide with the publication of Volume 64:2 of the McGill Law Journal, the MLJ Podcast is introducing bite-sized bonus episodes where listeners can hear directly from authors about their work. In this episode, Professor Noah Weisbord discusses his timely article, Who’s Afraid of the Lucky Moose? Canada’s Dangerous Self-Defence Innovation: "With little public discussion, the Canadian law of self-defence has become, in important respects, more permissive than Florida's notorious stand-your-ground law.

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La clause dérogatoire : un outil politique ou démocratique? show art La clause dérogatoire : un outil politique ou démocratique?

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

En juin 2019, l’Assemblée nationale du Québec adopta la fameuse Loi sur la laïcité de l’État, ce qui suscita de vifs débats sur la scène politique. Au cœur de la polémique se trouve l’utilisation controversée de l’article 33 de la Charte canadienne, autrement connu sous le nom de « clause dérogatoire ». Le présent balado a pour objet d’éclaircir le débat entourant l’utilisation de la clause dérogatoire, et ce, en se concentrant sur son utilisation dans la Loi sur la laïcité de

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Third Party Litigation Funding: A New Gold Rush? show art Third Party Litigation Funding: A New Gold Rush?

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Third-party litigation funding (TPLF) has become a steadily growing practice in recent years, as more and more parties are bringing lawsuits to court with the financial help of large hedge funds or specialized commercial companies. In this episode, we explore this new judicial practice further by speaking with Professor Jasminka Kalajdzic, director of the Class Action Clinic at Windsor Law School, and Me Neil A. Peden, litigator at Woods LLP.

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The Eye in the Sky: Facial Recognition Technology and the New Surveillance State show art The Eye in the Sky: Facial Recognition Technology and the New Surveillance State

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Facial recognition technology is increasingly being used by law enforcement across Canada. However, law enforcement has not always been transparent about its use. In this episode, we explore these issues by speaking with Ignacio Cofone, assistant professor at the Faculty of Law of McGill University, and Andrea Slane, associate professor at the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities of the Ontario Tech University.

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More Episodes

Third-party litigation funding (TPLF) has become a steadily growing practice in recent years, as more and more parties are bringing lawsuits to court with the financial help of large hedge funds or specialized commercial companies. In this episode, we explore this new judicial practice further by speaking with Professor Jasminka Kalajdzic, director of the Class Action Clinic at Windsor Law School, and Me Neil A. Peden, litigator at Woods LLP, about his upcoming case 9354-9186 Québec inc. v. Callidus Capital Corp. This is the first case dealing with TPLF to be litigated at the Supreme Court of Canada. Since the recording of this episode, Me Peden has won his case, shedding further light on this emerging practice. Ce podcast est bilingue et a été réalisé par Nathaniel Reilly et Victor Vauclair, membres juniors de la RDM. Produit par Talia Huculak, Rédactrice des podcasts de la RDM.