loader from loading.io

Episode 110 - ZOOMing In: Is Psyche Alive Online?

This Jungian Life

Release Date: 05/07/2020

Episode 112 - Midlife Crisis: Renewal or Stagnation show art Episode 112 - Midlife Crisis: Renewal or Stagnation

This Jungian Life

Jung was particularly interested in the second half of life, perhaps because after his own midlife crisis he found himself so surprisingly generative. We tend to spend the first half of life oriented to familial values and cultural norms for success.    Education, work, partnering and child rearing are some of the mile markers for speed and distance on the road of life—until midlife strikes. We may then discover that worldly successes feel flat, or blame discontent on bad breaks.    Although dramatic lifestyle changes at midlife are the stuff of story, malaise at the...

info_outline
Episode 111 - Jung, UFOs & Aliens: The Truth is Out There show art Episode 111 - Jung, UFOs & Aliens: The Truth is Out There

This Jungian Life

The Pentagon recently released a film of a UFO made by Navy pilots. Although such credible documentation is new, UFO sightings go back to ancient times and surged after World War II. 

info_outline
Episode 110 - ZOOMing In: Is Psyche Alive Online? show art Episode 110 - ZOOMing In: Is Psyche Alive Online?

This Jungian Life

We have moved our lives online. But can we experience authentic human connection through virtual technology? Can we date, mourn, or have psychoanalysis on a screen? If screens offer some surprising intimacies—close-ups of wedding vows and eulogies—they also deprive us of embodied participation. Staying at home has made us newly eager to socialize—separately. Dating means conversation, not cuddling.

info_outline
Episode 109 - Jung & Astrology: Cosmos & Character show art Episode 109 - Jung & Astrology: Cosmos & Character

This Jungian Life

Astrology is a 4000-year-old discipline rooted in the mystery of man’s relationship to the universe. It is an archetypal frame for human experience that influenced Jung, depicts our connection to the heavens, and anticipates future trends.

info_outline
Episode 108 - Authority: Who’s in Charge Around Here? show art Episode 108 - Authority: Who’s in Charge Around Here?

This Jungian Life

The dictionary defines authority as the power to “influence or command thought, opinion or behavior.” Authority’s Latin roots are master, leader, author—thus it lives next to its tough cousin, power. Families, organizations, and governing bodies influence and command us, whether slightly or mightily. Authority has legitimacy, from a traffic officer’s directives to a mentor’s wisdom.

info_outline
Episode 107 - Nigredo: Finding Light in Our Darkness show art Episode 107 - Nigredo: Finding Light in Our Darkness

This Jungian Life

The alchemical term nigredo means black or blackening, and is associated with decomposition and putrefaction. As a psychological state, nigredo is “the great suffering and grief” which the detached forces of nature inflict on the soul.

info_outline
Episode 106 - When Everything Changes: Is There Opportunity in Crisis? show art Episode 106 - When Everything Changes: Is There Opportunity in Crisis?

This Jungian Life

In the Chinese language, the two characters representing crisis are danger and opportunity. Can that possibly be true of these days of pandemic crisis, with physical, economic, and psychological destabilization? Voices of experience and wisdom speak to us about finding potential in desperate situations.

info_outline
Episode 105 - Ancestors: Our Psychological Inheritance show art Episode 105 - Ancestors: Our Psychological Inheritance

This Jungian Life

The archetype of origins is in resurgence since the advent of ancestry-mapping programs. What are the psychological and symbolic meanings of ancestry? Identity is often strongly linked to ancestry in its ethnic and cultural aspects, and as the carrier of personal traits.

info_outline
Episode 104 - Therapist Disclosures: Withholding or Overloading? show art Episode 104 - Therapist Disclosures: Withholding or Overloading?

This Jungian Life

Should an analyst share personal information with clients? Freud believed that the analyst should be devoid of personal presence, so he sat unseen behind his famous couch. Jung realized that regardless of theory, psychotherapy entailed two people in a room interacting. 

info_outline
Episode 103 - Facing the Fear of Coronavirus: Finding a Grounding Attitude show art Episode 103 - Facing the Fear of Coronavirus: Finding a Grounding Attitude

This Jungian Life

The word plague derives from the Latin plangere, “to strike the breast as if in lamentation.” The novel coronavirus has visited loss, fear and hardship on many. Nature in her destructive mode can radically disrupt cultural creations and norms and show us how fragile they – and we -- are.

info_outline
 
More Episodes

We have moved our lives online. But can we experience authentic human connection through virtual technology? Can we date, mourn, or have psychoanalysis on a screen? If screens offer some surprising intimacies—close-ups of wedding vows and eulogies—they also deprive us of embodied participation. Staying at home has made us newly eager to socialize—separately. Dating means conversation, not cuddling.

We enter the homes of colleagues, clients, and even newscasters, but despite this implicit amity we’re not guests. Psychoanalysts refer to “the analytic third,” physicists propound unified field theory, and Jung had these words carved over his door: Called or not called, God will be there. 

There is an autonomous spirit and independent intelligence that lives in and between us and even onscreen. It can hold us in the mystery of meaningful connection that is not contingent on physical presence.

 

Dream

I was a magician’s apprentice. The magician was old and dying, and was in a hurry to pass on his legacy to me. He showed me a wooden box with jewelry. The box was placed on the lid of a deep well to the underworld. He opened the box and gave me two black diamonds, and told me he had locked a dangerous demon inside the well by casting a spell with the diamonds.

If the diamonds were ever to fall inside the well the demon would get back its power and escape the well. It was my job now to make sure no one threw the diamonds into the well. The magician then turned into an old man (who I think was my grandfather). He was suffering from dementia and kept trying to put one of the diamonds in the well, which he succeeded with when I turned my back on him for a moment. The demons came out--one was a big blue lobster.

They were free but had lost their evil powers, since I still had one of the diamonds in my hand. The lobster-demon demanded I use my power to lift the spell from the diamond, which I did. But nothing happened. The demons were still powerless. I realized that the demons had been in the well for so long that they had forgot how to be evil, and now they were loving creatures that just wanted to be free.