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The 2020 election in blue metros and red states

The Brookings Cafeteria

Release Date: 10/06/2020

Girls' education is key to climate change solutions show art Girls' education is key to climate change solutions

The Brookings Cafeteria

Three people involved in addressing climate change through girls’ and gender-equal education share their insights and policy ideas about how a green learning agenda can help address the climate crisis through education. Christina Kwauk is a nonresident fellow in the Center for Universal Education at Brookings; Lucia Fry is director of research and policy at Malala Fund; and Raju Narzary is a Malala Fund Education Champion and executive director of North East Research and Social Work Networking in India’s Assam State. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple...

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Can Taiwan have security AND the good life? show art Can Taiwan have security AND the good life?

The Brookings Cafeteria

Richard Bush, whose experience with Taiwan spans decades, discusses his new book, “Difficult Choices: Taiwan’s quest for security and the good life,” just published by the Brookings Institution Press. Also, David Wessel offers his thoughts on the Federal Reserve's approach to inflation, calling it a "big deal." Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .

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Betting on the future with infrastructure show art Betting on the future with infrastructure

The Brookings Cafeteria

Infrastructure is front and center in the Washington DC policy debate, and with President Biden’s 2.3 trillion dollar proposal on the table, this won't be another so-called infrastructure week that comes and goes with a chuckle but no action. On this episode of the Brookings Cafeteria, Adie Tomer, the co-author of a deeply important report on how to address America’s infrastructure challenges and opportunities, talks about what it means to not just rebuild infrastructure, but to REIMAGINE it. Adie Tomer is a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and, along with Joseph Kane and Caroline...

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What online forum discussions reveal about segregation in DC public schools about segregation in DC public schools show art What online forum discussions reveal about segregation in DC public schools about segregation in DC public schools

The Brookings Cafeteria

How does an online community, dominated by privileged parents, discuss its local school system? In a new report titled “We all want what’s best for our kids: Discussions of D.C. public school options in an online forum,” Brookings researchers examined thousands of messages on the D.C. Urban Moms school discussion forum to find out what they were talking about and how their conversations reflect continued racial segregation in the public schools of the nation’s capital. The report is co-authored by Vanessa Williamson, Jackson Gode, and Hao Sun. Williamson, a senior fellow in Governance...

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Why teacher diversity benefits students of color show art Why teacher diversity benefits students of color

The Brookings Cafeteria

Teacher diversity is teacher quality, and students of color especially benefit by having teachers who look like them, says Michael Hansen, co-author with Seth Gershenson and Constance A. Lindsay of "Teacher Diversity and Student Success: Why Racial Representation Matters in the Classroom," published in March by Harvard Education Press. Hansen, who is the Herman and George R. Brown Chair and director of the Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, and also a senior fellow in Governance Studies, explains why promoting racial diversity among the teacher workforce disproportionately benefits...

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An American journalist in Cold War Moscow show art An American journalist in Cold War Moscow

The Brookings Cafeteria

In "Assignment Russia: Becoming a Foreign Correspondent in the Crucible of the Cold War," award winning journalist Marvin Kalb tells the story of how as a young reporter and student of Russia he was present not only at the creation of a new way of bringing news immediately to the public, but also doing so in the midst of Cold War tensions between Eisenhower’s America and Khrushchev’s Soviet Union. In this episode, Brookings Institution Press Director Bill Finan interviews Kalb about his new book, the second volume of his memoirs published by Brookings. Also on this episode, David Wessel,...

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Policy priorities for women, by women show art Policy priorities for women, by women

The Brookings Cafeteria

March is typically a time to celebrate women’s contributions in history, but the past year of COVID-19 has had a disproportionate impact on women – especially women of color. On this episode, in honor of Women’s History Month, we asked women at the Brookings Institution to share their thoughts on what top policy considerations they have for the Biden administration to help address the needs of women – both in the US and around the world. Also on this episode, Marcela Escobari offers another edition of our of Sustainable Development Spotlight series, with a focus on her new policy brief...

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Proposals for US climate leadership and managing built environment risks and costs show art Proposals for US climate leadership and managing built environment risks and costs

The Brookings Cafeteria

On this sixth and final episode from the Blueprints for American Renewal and Prosperity project, two Brookings experts discuss their blueprints for climate and resilience. Nathan Hultman is a nonresident senior fellow in Global Economy and Development at Brookings and also the director of the Center for Global Sustainability and associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy. He is the co-author with Samantha Gross of “How the United States can return to credible climate leadership.” Joseph Kane is a senior research associate and associate fellow in the...

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Lessons from the Fukushima nuclear meltdown, 10 years on show art Lessons from the Fukushima nuclear meltdown, 10 years on

The Brookings Cafeteria

March 2021 marks ten years since an earthquake off Japan’s Pacific Coast and the tsunami it caused led to reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to melt down, releasing radiation and forcing the government to evacuate over 100,000 residents in surrounding areas. As the author of a new book from the Brookings Institution Press writes, failures at all levels of Japan’s government and private sector worsened the human and economic impact of the disaster and ensured that its consequences would endure for years to come. On this episode of the Brookings Cafeteria, Brookings Press...

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Proposals to meet global challenges in artificial intelligence and technology regulation show art Proposals to meet global challenges in artificial intelligence and technology regulation

The Brookings Cafeteria

On this fifth episode from the Blueprints for American Renewal and Prosperity project, two Brookings experts discuss their blueprints for strengthening governance to meet key international challenges in the technology arena. Senior Fellow Landry Signé is co-author with Stephan Almond of "A blueprint for technology governance in the post-pandemic world," and Senior Fellow Joshua Meltzer is co-author with Cameron Kerry of "Strengthening international cooperation on artificial intelligence." Also on this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary...

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More Episodes

In this special edition of the podcast, Bill Finan—director of the Brookings Institution Press—talks with two of the authors of a new Brookings press book that explores America’s current political division from demographic and geographic perspectives. David Damore, Robert Lang, and Karen Danielsen, all professors at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, are co-authors of Blue Metros, Red States: The Shifting Urban-Rural Divide in America’s Swing States. Damore and Lang join Finan for this episode in which they address some of the factors that tend to make large metropolitan areas lean Democratic while existing in a sea of rural areas that are largely Republican. And, how do states like Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Texas—with both large urban areas and widespread rural areas—express this red-blue divide between rural and metropolitan areas? Listen also to find out which two counties in America could indicate which way the election is going on November 3.

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The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.