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Episode 95 - Moral Discipline

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

Release Date: 12/14/2020

Episode 103 - Being an Upholder of The Dharma  show art Episode 103 - Being an Upholder of The Dharma

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

In this episode we look at what it means to be an “Upholder of the Dharma” according to Buddha, and how we can, in a practical way, be one. In particular, we try to lessen the harm we do.   One does not uphold the Dharma     Only because one speaks a lot. Having heard even a little,     If one perceives the Dharma with one’s own body And is never negligent of the Dharma,     Then one is indeed an upholder of the Dharma. (Verse 259) --Buddha, The Dhammapada   Doing no harm,  Practice what’s skillful,  Purify...

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Episode 102 - What makes one wise? (According to Buddha) show art Episode 102 - What makes one wise? (According to Buddha)

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

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Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

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Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

If we want to live in a beautiful world, we must give up the fault-finding mind. The more we give up faulting-finding, the happier we will be. Our relationships will also be more harmonious. We can decide what kind of world we want to live in-- a beautiful world or a world full of faults and problems.   To celebrate the 100th episode, I am giving away a 30 minute phone call with me to talk about your practice (or anything you would like) and a mala I made and blessed. For a chance to win, go to and enter your email between March 14th -  March 21, 2021. Winner will be announced on...

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Episode 99:- 3 Poisons, 3 Virtuous Roots  show art Episode 99:- 3 Poisons, 3 Virtuous Roots

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

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Episode 98 - Rejoicing Versus Jealousy  show art Episode 98 - Rejoicing Versus Jealousy

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

When we’re jealous, there’s a wish that another would not have the happiness or good fortune we’re observing. It is the opposite of a bodhisattva wish for others to be happy, for jealousy actually wishes that others not have happiness. This is why jealousy is such a hindrance on the path to enlightenment because it conjures a very different intention than the compassionate, bodhicitta intention were trying to cultivate.    A Buddhist definition of jealousy: A disturbing state of mind that involves an inability to bear another’s fortune due to being attached to something...

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Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

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Episode 96 - Ignorance, The Greatest Corruption show art Episode 96 - Ignorance, The Greatest Corruption

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

In this verse, the Buddha says that the greatest corruption is ignorance. Ignorance is an unknowing; it is not knowing something. What is it that we do not know that is our greatest corruption because it is the underlying cause of all our suffering and confusion? It is ignorance of the way things actually exist as opposed to the way they appear. It is an unknowing of reality.    The mistaken way we are viewing everything is that we believe that all things exist exactly as they appear, in an independent and self contained way. We believe things exist independently of our perception,...

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Episode 95 - Moral Discipline  show art Episode 95 - Moral Discipline

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

Within the Four NobleTruths, Buddha taught the method to end suffering, which is the Eightfold Path. The Eightfold Path has three areas of focus: moral discipline, mental discipline, and wisdom. In almost all his discourses when teaching directly to people, Buddha included the Eightfold path. In this verse, Buddha is giving an explanation on moral discipline, and if we look at early Buddhism, directly from Buddha, we see that there is a great emphasis on right conduct and moral discipline. Why would this be? It is because moral discipline is the foundation of happiness.    Bad...

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Episode 94 - What Would Love Have Me Do? show art Episode 94 - What Would Love Have Me Do?

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

What is joyous perseverance (effort)?   “When you have focused upon something virtuous, joyous perseverance is enthusiasm for it. Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds says:   What is joyous perseverance? It is delight in virtue.    The Bodhisattva Levels explains it as a flawless state of mind that is enthusiastic about accumulating virtue and working for the welfare of living beings, together with the physical, verbal, and mental activity such a state of mind motivates.” —Je Tsongkhapa (reference below)   Joyous perseverance is supreme among virtues; Based on it,...

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Within the Four NobleTruths, Buddha taught the method to end suffering, which is the Eightfold Path. The Eightfold Path has three areas of focus: moral discipline, mental discipline, and wisdom. In almost all his discourses when teaching directly to people, Buddha included the Eightfold path. In this verse, Buddha is giving an explanation on moral discipline, and if we look at early Buddhism, directly from Buddha, we see that there is a great emphasis on right conduct and moral discipline. Why would this be? It is because moral discipline is the foundation of happiness. 

 

Bad conduct is corruption in a person; 

Stinginess, corruption in a giver.

Evil traits corrupt people 

In both this world and the next. (242)*

—Buddha, The Dhammapada  



The Noble Eightfold Path

  1. Right understanding (Samma ditthi)
  2. Right thought (Samma sankappa)

 

  • Right speech (Samma vaca) 
  • Right action (Samma kammanta)
  • Right livelihood (Samma ajiva)

 

  1. Right effort (Samma vayama)
  2. Right mindfulness (Samma sati)
  3. Right concentration (Samma samadhi)



Links and References

Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.62-63.

Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 144-150.