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America's Diversity Explosion Is Coming Just in Time

The Brookings Cafeteria

Release Date: 11/14/2014

After the COVID-19 lockdowns, how to fix benefit delivery tech for workers show art After the COVID-19 lockdowns, how to fix benefit delivery tech for workers

The Brookings Cafeteria

The COVID-19 lockdowns in 2020 caused a tidal wave of displaced workers who applied for unemployment insurance, or UI. But states, hampered by limited staff and outdated systems, struggled to get relief to these workers quickly and to implement expanded UI programs under the CARES Act. On this episode, a discussion with Annelies Goger, co-author of a new report that focuses on a holistic redesign of the labor and education digital ecosystems to improve user experience and equity in access. Goger, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, is co-author with Janie McDermott...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

An interview with Brookings Senior Fellow John Hudak about his new paper, "Reversing the War on Drugs: A five-point plan," in which he lays out a series of policy actions the Biden administration could take short of full federal legalization to promote justice and equity and to help reverse some of what he calls the disastrous consequences of the War on Drugs. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, explains how the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic exposed vulnerabilities in our financial markets--especially in the "shadow...

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The Trump Organization tax fraud charges show art The Trump Organization tax fraud charges

The Brookings Cafeteria

Just days before tax fraud, larceny, and other charges against the Trump Organization and one of its top executives were filed in New York, Brookings published a report by four leading experts titled “New York State’s Trump Investigation: An analysis of the reported facts and applicable law.” On this episode, one of the report’s co-authors—Ambassador Norm Eisen, a senior fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings, discusses the report's findings. This conversation occurred after the initial charges were filed, but before any other legal developments occurred. Also on this...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

China is no longer just a rising power; it is now a truly global actor, economically and militarily. In a new book from the Brookings Institution Press, a collection of experts provides a broad assessment of the implications of China’s role as a world power. The book, “Global China: Assessing China’s Growing Role in the World,” is edited by Tarun Chhabra, Rush Doshi, Ryan Hass, and Emilie Kimball. On this episode of the Brookings Cafeteria, Brookings Press Director Bill Finan interviews Hass and Kimball about the book. Also on this episode, Metropolitan Policy Program Fellow Joseph...

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Dirty money in offshore banks show art Dirty money in offshore banks

The Brookings Cafeteria

Billions of dollars and other currencies are in tax havens outside the owner’s country of origin, allowing individuals and corporations to evade taxation by their home governments. Since many of these offshore accounts are secret, it’s difficult to trace what’s legal and what is not. In new research, Brookings expert Matthew Collin, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Global Economy and Development, examines a leaked dataset from a bank in the Isle of Man to find some interesting discoveries about who owns these accounts. In this conversation, Collin discusses his findings and some policy...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

Truth is contested ground. Facts are under attack. From disinformation to conspiracy theories, from social media pile-ons to campus intolerance, Americans are facing an epistemic crisis in their ability to distinguish fact from fiction and truth from falsehood. This episode features the author of a pathbreaking book on this crisis and how we get out of it. Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings, is the author of The Constitution of Knowledge: A Defense of Truth, just published by the Brookings Institution Press. Rauch is interviewed by Brookings Press Director Bill...

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A public reckoning on racial injustice and inequality show art A public reckoning on racial injustice and inequality

The Brookings Cafeteria

As the nation observes Juneteenth, we are still grappling with serious issues around civil rights, economic and political inequality, and unfairness in the criminal justice system. Now, a year after widespread protests in the wake of the murder of George Floyd by a police officer once again brought these issues to the top of the national conversation, Makada Henry-Nickie, a fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings and an expert on policies that advance inclusive economic opportunities for disadvantaged families and low-income communities, joins the podcast. In the discussion, she talks about...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

On this two-part episode, Senior Fellow William Frey from the Metropolitan Policy Program answers a few questions about recent and upcoming 2020 Census data. Also, Brookings scholar Richard Reeves and AEI scholar Scott Winship discuss the new AEI-Brookings report, "Long shadows: The Black-white gap in multigenerational poverty." 01:30 = Discussion on the Census with William Frey 16:00 = Interview with Richard Reeves and Scott Winship. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

The world is in an age of peace, relatively speaking. Great powers are not fighting each other and haven’t for a long time. But, the expert guest on this episode says, the United States must stay good at the art of war. Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon talks about his new book, “The Art of War in an Age of Peace: U.S. Grand Strategy and Resolute Restraint,” published in May by Yale University Press. In it, O’Hanlon presents a national security policy that contends with current challenges like Russia, China, North Korea, and Middle East turmoil, but also calls for attention to new...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

On this episode, an interview with Sanjay Patnaik, director of the Center on Regulation and Markets at Brookings and the Bernard L. Schwartz Chair in Economic Policy Development. He discusses the mission of the center, and also talks about his own research on topics like climate resilience and carbon pricing. Also on this episode, David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, offers his views on why inflation expectations are extremely important. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send...

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More Episodes

"I am convinced that the United States is in the midst of a pivotal period ushering in extraordinary shifts in the nation's racial demographic makeup," writes William Frey in his new book, Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America. In this podcast, Frey, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and an internationally regarded demographer, explains what he means by "diversity explosion"; why growing minority populations are so important for America; and what public officials, community leaders, and decision-makers need to understand about the importance of educating and training a new generation of workers.

Frey also discusses how he got into the field of demography, and what it means when people say "demography is destiny." 

Also in the podcast, David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, offers his regular economic update, noting that "something weird is going on" when broad measures of the labor market are looking better yet two-thirds of the voters say the economy is getting worse.


Show notes:

• Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics Are Remaking America
• Immigrants Continue to Disperse, with Fastest Growth in the Suburbs
• Social Mobility Memos
• "The Great American Melting Pot" (music/lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, performed by Lori Lieberman, Schoolhouse Rock, 1977)


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