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America's Diversity Explosion Is Coming Just in Time

The Brookings Cafeteria

Release Date: 11/14/2014

A new social contract for Big Tech show art A new social contract for Big Tech

The Brookings Cafeteria

In this world of endless technology that permeates all our lives, how can individuals, institutions, and governments harness its positive contributions while protecting each of us, no matter who or where we are? That’s a central question addressed by the guest expert on this episode in his new book from the Brookings Institution Press, titled, "Terms of Disservice: How Silicon Valley is Destructive by Design." Author Dipayan Ghosh is Pozen Fellow at the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. A computer scientist by training, he has served as a...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

Ten years remain for the world to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, including inclusive and equitable quality education for all. But the global learning crisis, made worse by the coronavirus pandemic, demands solutions at-scale for governments around the world. How to achieve the financing required to deliver quality education? One solution links payment to achievement of outcomes through social and development impact bonds. On this episode, two experts discuss the global crisis in education, and also the opportunities and challenges of impact bonds for education. Emily...

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Race and gender gaps in COVID-19 deaths show art Race and gender gaps in COVID-19 deaths

The Brookings Cafeteria

Senior Fellow Richard Reeves discusses his analysis of data on COVID-19 deaths and why a disproportionate number of men, and Black people, are dying.  Also, Molly Reynolds explains what actions Congress is taking in response to the protests against police misconduct, and why it matters that many of these proposals are being sponsored by Black members of Congress. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part...

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Global China's ambitions in the Indian Ocean region show art Global China's ambitions in the Indian Ocean region

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In this special edition of the Brookings Cafeteria Podcast, Lindsey Ford, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Foreign Policy, interviews two scholars on two important aspects of China's increasing global presence, including in the Horn of Africa and Chinese military activities in the Indian Ocean region as a whole. Joshua White is a nonresident fellow in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings and an associate professor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. Zach Vertin, also a nonresident fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings, is a lecturer of public and...

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Tracking COVID-19's spread into less urban, whiter, and more Trump-friendly places show art Tracking COVID-19's spread into less urban, whiter, and more Trump-friendly places

The Brookings Cafeteria

Senior Fellow William Frey from the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution has been tracking COVID-19's spread from mostly urban areas that have a large number of African American residents, and tended to vote more for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 election, to other parts of the country that are less urban, are whiter, and more strongly supported President Trump.  On this episode, Frey talks about his analysis and what it means for our understanding of the spread of COVID-19 nationwide.  Also on this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel asks what...

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How digital privacy law asymmetries can hurt criminal defendants show art How digital privacy law asymmetries can hurt criminal defendants

The Brookings Cafeteria

A defendant in a criminal trial is accused of threatening someone over a social media app. The prosecution can subpoena digital records from the social media company to build its case against the defendant. However, evidence that would prove the defendant’s innocence is also held by that company, and yet defense investigators are unable to obtain it due to the way data privacy laws are currently written. In this scenario, a privacy asymmetry exists between prosecution and defense that could keep an innocent person in jail. Rebecca Wexler, a law professor at the University of California...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Institution hosted a virtual event to complement the launch of a new publication on how to reopen America. The event opened with keynote remarks from Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. An expert panel of Brookings experts discussed the roadmap for reopening America. Brookings President John R. Allen moderated the discussion. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.

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The Brookings Cafeteria

In this episode, Governance Studies Senior Fellow John Hudak interviews Representative Judy Chu (D-Calif.), who represents California's 27th Congressional District, about immigrants and immigration in the context of the coronavirus pandemic. Rep. Chu talks about legislation intended to help immigrants—especially frontline workers—get the assistance they need, and addresses whether she thinks immigration reform is possible at some point in the future. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us...

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A new paradigm for valuing Black communities show art A new paradigm for valuing Black communities

The Brookings Cafeteria

In his new book, "Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities," just published by Brookings Institution press, Andre Perry takes readers on a tour through six-majority Black cities whose assets and strengths are undervalued, and offers a new paradigm to determine the value of Black communities. On this episode, Robert Wicks interviews Perry, a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, about his book. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow Sarah Binder walks you through three developments on Capitol Hill in Washington that deserve a closer look. Subscribe to...

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The Brookings Cafeteria

Senior Fellow Isabel Sawhill leads a conversation with Stephanie Aaronson, the vice president and director of Economic Studies at Brookings, and Molly Kinder, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, about some of the key issues in women’s participation in the workforce and society, with attention to the gender impact of the coronavirus pandemic. This episode marks the launch of "19A," the new gender equality series at the Brookings Institution. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at...

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More Episodes

"I am convinced that the United States is in the midst of a pivotal period ushering in extraordinary shifts in the nation's racial demographic makeup," writes William Frey in his new book, Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America. In this podcast, Frey, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and an internationally regarded demographer, explains what he means by "diversity explosion"; why growing minority populations are so important for America; and what public officials, community leaders, and decision-makers need to understand about the importance of educating and training a new generation of workers.

Frey also discusses how he got into the field of demography, and what it means when people say "demography is destiny." 

Also in the podcast, David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, offers his regular economic update, noting that "something weird is going on" when broad measures of the labor market are looking better yet two-thirds of the voters say the economy is getting worse.


Show notes:

• Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics Are Remaking America
• Immigrants Continue to Disperse, with Fastest Growth in the Suburbs
• Social Mobility Memos
• "The Great American Melting Pot" (music/lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, performed by Lori Lieberman, Schoolhouse Rock, 1977)


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