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America's Diversity Explosion Is Coming Just in Time

The Brookings Cafeteria

Release Date: 11/14/2014

17 Rooms, a new podcast for the Sustainable Development Goals show art 17 Rooms, a new podcast for the Sustainable Development Goals

The Brookings Cafeteria

This is a rebroadcast of the first episode of a new show from the Brookings Podcast Network—”17 Rooms,” a podcast about actions, insights, and community for the Sustainable Development Goals (or SDGs) and the people driving them. In “17 Rooms,” co-hosts John McArthur—who directs the Center for Sustainable Development at Brookings, and Zia Khan—senior vice president for innovation at The Rockefeller Foundation, talk with thought leaders and practitioners who are pushing to make change across all 17 of the SDGs as part of the 17 Rooms initiative, where people from diverse...

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When is a public policy racist? show art When is a public policy racist?

The Brookings Cafeteria

Jim Crow laws that prevented Black citizens from voting are clearly racist, as are redlining practices that excluded Black homebuyers from white neighborhoods. But what about laws and regulations that don’t rely on disparate treatment based on race? Can such policies still be racist? Bill Gale explores these questions in his new research, including in a paper titled “Public Finance and Racism.” He is the Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy, a senior fellow in Economic Studies, and co-director of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. Also on this episode,...

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Computer science education builds skills for life show art Computer science education builds skills for life

The Brookings Cafeteria

Computer science education in K-12 schools matters, not because it’s about training the next generation of computer programmers, but because computer science education builds skills for life, say the guests on this episode. Emiliana Vegas, senior fellow and co-director of the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, and Michael Hansen, senior fellow in the Brown Center for Education Policy at Brookings, are co-authors, along with Brian Fowler, of a new report, “Building Skills for Life: How to expand and improve computer science education around the world,” and they join me on the...

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Putin, Trump, and the road to authoritarianism show art Putin, Trump, and the road to authoritarianism

The Brookings Cafeteria

On this episode, a discussion with experts Fiona Hill and Angela Stent on Russia’s re-emergence as a great power after the Cold War ended, under the leadership of Vladimir Putin, and also more broadly on how economic change, deindustrialization, and other forces open doors for populist leaders to rise in places like Russia, and the United States and the United Kingdom as well, as we’ve seen in recent years. Stent is a nonresident senior fellow with the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings and senior adviser to the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies and...

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Cyberbullying and bystander intervention show art Cyberbullying and bystander intervention

The Brookings Cafeteria

Seventy percent of people report that they have done something abusive to someone else online, and a majority report being cyberbullied themselves. Nearly 90 percent of teenagers report witnessing online bullying. In a new report published by Brookings, “Bystander intervention on social media: Examining cyberbullying and reactions to systemic racism,” researchers examine the cyberbullying phenomenon, especially its racial aspect, and the strategies onlookers use to intervene. On this episode, two report authors discuss their findings: Rashawn Ray, senior fellow in Governance Studies at...

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What does success at the Glasgow climate conference (COP26) look like? show art What does success at the Glasgow climate conference (COP26) look like?

The Brookings Cafeteria

Global leaders are gathering in Glasgow in the coming weeks as the United Kingdom hosts the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties, known as COP26. As global temperatures continue to rise, the calls for action on addressing the climate change threat rise as well. On this episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, a leading expert on global climate policy and financing for climate action, Amar Bhattacharya, senior fellow in the Center for Sustainable Development at Brookings, shares his perspective on what will make COP26 successful, what sustainable and inclusive...

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Ending the state and local taxes (SALT) deduction show art Ending the state and local taxes (SALT) deduction

The Brookings Cafeteria

Millions of American taxpayers itemize their deductions, one of which is for state and local taxes, or the SALT deduction. Most of these filers are at the upper end of the income distribution and live in high-income urban areas. On this episode, Senior Fellow Richard Reeves, director of the Future of the Middle Class Initiative at Brookings, says the SALT deduction mostly benefits the wealthiest taxpayers, gives little or no benefit to the middle class, and should be eliminated entirely. He also talks about the unusual politics of the debate in Washington, where Democratic leaders are calling...

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Politics and the pandemic in Latino and Native American communities show art Politics and the pandemic in Latino and Native American communities

The Brookings Cafeteria

This episode features an interview with an expert who calls immigration and the Latino vote a golden opportunity for Democrats in 2022. Gabriel Sanchez is a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings and a professor of political science at the University of New Mexico. In the interview, he discusses a range of policy issues including why COVID-19 has had such a devastating impact on Latino families, why vaccination rates are so high in Native American communities, and why immigration policy remains so important headed into the midterm elections. Sanchez is also Founding...

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Unpacking Opportunity Zones tax havens show art Unpacking Opportunity Zones tax havens

The Brookings Cafeteria

David Wessel, a senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy at Brookings, is author of the new book “Only the Rich Can Play: How Washington Works in the New Gilded Age,” published by Public Affairs, which tells the story of how a Silicon Valley entrepreneur developed an idea intended to help poor people that will save rich people money on their taxes. Wessel relates in his book how the tax break, passed into law in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, led to the creation of over eight thousand tax havens across the U.S. called Opportunity Zones. This...

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White decline and increased diversity in America's aging population show art White decline and increased diversity in America's aging population

The Brookings Cafeteria

America’s white population is declining and aging, while the share of Latinos or Hispanics, Asians, and people who identify as two are more races is increasing. These are some of the findings in new analysis from Brookings Senior Fellow Bill Frey, who joins the Brookings Cafeteria to talk about America’s changing demographics and the implications. Also on this episode, Tony Pipa, a senior fellow in the Center for Sustainable Development, highlights the work of local elected leaders and private sector leaders in the U.S. who are prioritizing action on achieving the Sustainable Development...

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More Episodes

"I am convinced that the United States is in the midst of a pivotal period ushering in extraordinary shifts in the nation's racial demographic makeup," writes William Frey in his new book, Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America. In this podcast, Frey, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and an internationally regarded demographer, explains what he means by "diversity explosion"; why growing minority populations are so important for America; and what public officials, community leaders, and decision-makers need to understand about the importance of educating and training a new generation of workers.

Frey also discusses how he got into the field of demography, and what it means when people say "demography is destiny." 

Also in the podcast, David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, offers his regular economic update, noting that "something weird is going on" when broad measures of the labor market are looking better yet two-thirds of the voters say the economy is getting worse.


Show notes:

• Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics Are Remaking America
• Immigrants Continue to Disperse, with Fastest Growth in the Suburbs
• Social Mobility Memos
• "The Great American Melting Pot" (music/lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, performed by Lori Lieberman, Schoolhouse Rock, 1977)


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