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Sex, Lies, and Justice Lori Douglas

The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Release Date: 01/19/2015

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The McGill Law Journal Podcast

Lors du dernier épisode, nous avons mis en lumière, en compagnie du président de l’Association du barreau canadien, Brad Regehr, le processus de nomination de la magistrature aux cours supérieures du Canada. Dans cet épisode, nous situerons le processus de nomination judiciaire dans son contexte politique plus large. Notre invité est Patrick Taillon, professeur à la Faculté de droit de l'Université Laval.

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This episode explores how governments are beginning to re-think tax policy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our guests are two Osgoode Hall Law School professors: Jinyan Li, co-academic director of the LLM tax program, and Scott Wilkie, a tax law practitioner and a former chair of the Canadian Tax Foundation.

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The McGill Law Journal Podcast

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The McGill Law Journal Podcast

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More Episodes

Manitoba judge, Lori Douglas, has sexually explicit photos out there on the Internet. They were put out there by her now-deceased husband without her consent. Since 2011, the Canadian Judicial Council has been inquiring into whether she should be removed from the bench. The inquiry committee was set to look at the photos until Justice Douglas negotiated that she would retire. In exchange, the CJC has suspended the inquiry.

In this episode we get to the bottom of Justice Douglas’ story in hopes of uncovering what expectations we have of our judges. After Justice Douglas, who can be a judge? We talk with Kyle Kirkup, a Trudeau Scholar and doctoral student at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Law and Professor Susan Drummond of Osgoode Hall Law School.