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Episode 26 - Urban Conservatism with Avi Woolf

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Release Date: 03/05/2019

110 – Reaching the Future with Marlo Slayback show art 110 – Reaching the Future with Marlo Slayback

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Founded in the early 1950s, the sought to fill the gaping void in higher education where progressive ideas were in vogue and conservative ones were ignored or attacked.  Under the leadership of their first president, a young journalist named William F. Buckley Jr., ISI began mentoring young men and women to become eloquent defenders of the principles of liberty.  And they have continued this legacy on to today.   In this episode Josh is joined by ISI National Director of Student Programs Marlo Slayback to talk about the work of the organization, her personal journey to...

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109 – The Right with Matthew Continetti show art 109 – The Right with Matthew Continetti

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Esteemed AEI scholar Matthew Continetti returns to the podcast for a woefully brief overview of his latest book,   From the book’s description:   When most people think of the history of modern conservatism, they think of Ronald Reagan.  Yet this narrow view leaves many to question: How did Donald Trump win the presidency?  And what is the future of the Republican Party?   In The Right, Matthew Continetti gives a sweeping account of movement conservatism’s evolution, from the Progressive Era through the present.  He tells the story of how conservatism...

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108 – Following Up with Bo Winegard show art 108 – Following Up with Bo Winegard

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Bo Winegard returns to the show to talk about controversies surrounding the science of human variation, his experience with cancel culture, and the growing problems of cognitive distribution.  It’s another in-the-weeds wonkfest of alarmingly nerdish proportions.   About Bo Winegard   Bo Winegard obtained his PhD in social psychology from Florida State University, under the tutelage of Roy Baumeister. Formerly a professor at a small college in the Midwest, Bo is now an independent scholar interested in human evolution, human variation, the rise of political order, and political...

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107 – Right to Work with Christopher Chesny show art 107 – Right to Work with Christopher Chesny

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

As more and more working-class Americans join the Republican party some voices on the Right are advocating the GOP become the worker’s party—a role that has traditionally been held by various movements and parties of the Left.  Is there any merit to this idea?  What is the history of labor relations and the Right and Left in the United States?  How have labor unions and right to work laws evolved over the past century?  Do national candidates like JD Vance or Ron DeSantis have what it takes to capitalize on the surge of working-class voters on the Right?  Joining...

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106 – Reappraising Herbert Hoover with George Nash show art 106 – Reappraising Herbert Hoover with George Nash

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Historian George Nash returns to the show to discuss the life and legacy of Herbert Hoover.   Few American presidents are as decried by voices on both the Left and Right as Herbert Hoover.  His name has become synonymous with economic suffering and callous Federal response.  But Dr. Nash contends that the popular narrative linking Hoover to the catastrophes of the Great Depression do a great injustice to the actual historical account and reduce one of America’s most remarkable men to that of a callous buffoon.  Hoover, in Dr. Nash’s telling, was responsible for saving...

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105 – AllSides with Julie Mastrine show art 105 – AllSides with Julie Mastrine

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Julie Mastrine of joins Saving Elephants host Josh Lewis in a freewheeling conversation about the media.  Conservatives love to complain of the liberal media bias, but are their complaints founded or over exaggerated?  Do “both sides” have a bias problem?  How do they differ and how are they similar?  Are there times when bias is acceptable and even welcome?  Is bias the same as inaccuracy or dishonesty?  How might you identify media bias and what can we do about it?   About Julie Mastrine Julie Mastrine is a writer and online marketing professional who...

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104 – Armchair Burkeans with Bo Winegard show art 104 – Armchair Burkeans with Bo Winegard

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Josh engages in a Cannonball Run conversation with Bo Winegard across a wide variety of subjects from how Bo found himself migrating from the political Left to the Right, whether Edmund Burke believed in natural rights, how one might approach Burke from both a religious and secular angle, the curious tendency of the academic Left to erect strawman versions of conservatism, the limitations of Thomas Sowell’s constrained vs. unconstrained visions paradigm, how the GOP might chart a course between throwback Reaganism and MAGA Trumpism, and whether religion is necessary to sustain ordered...

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103 – Creative Impostors with Andrea Klunder and David Blatt show art 103 – Creative Impostors with Andrea Klunder and David Blatt

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

In this re-podcast episode Saving Elephants host Josh Lewis joins his committed liberal friend David Blatt on Andrea Klunder’s show to discuss the differences between the Right and the Left, why we’re so polarized, and how civil dialogue might be restored.   About Andrea Klunder Andrea Klunder is the Creative Director, Media Strategist and Podcast Producer behind .  Andrea works with organizations, companies, and leaders who want to use audio content to tell stories, create movements, and change culture.  She calls upon her myriad experiences as a singer, actor, director,...

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102 – More Talking Less Killing with Corey Nathan show art 102 – More Talking Less Killing with Corey Nathan

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

The British theologian and philosopher G. K. Chesterton observed that “religious liberty might be supposed to mean that everybody is free to discuss religion.  In practice it means that hardly anybody is allowed to mention it.”  When we talk openly about political or religious matters, we risk endangering relationships.  Yet politics and religion are immensely important topics that ought not to be ignored for the sake of avoiding awkward conversations.  Saving Elephants host Josh Lewis is joined by Corey Nathan as they discuss how we might talk politics and religion...

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101 – Voting Vexations show art 101 – Voting Vexations

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

How secure and reliable are elections in the United States?   The Left and Right are both replete with voices warning of the dire consequences of the “other side” getting their way.  And nowhere is this more evident than with concerns about the legitimacy of elections.  Whether it’s the Right’s concerns with voter fraud and election theft or the Left’s apprehensions about voter suppression and disenfranchisement, Americans are growing increasingly concerned that their votes don’t, or won’t, or eventually will not count.   What’s more, the leaders of each...

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Conservative thinkers from Russell Kirk to Irving Kristol to the Founding Fathers have, at best, cast a wary eye towards cities.  And across the country today, Leftist safe havens are often found in dense, urban areas.  Does conservatism only thrive in small towns?  And, if so, what does conservatism have to say for city life?  Should conservatives abandon cities in hopes of a renewal of rural America?  Or might there be a way to forge a path that both respects cities as cities and cultivates traditional virtues?

 

Joining us from Israel is Saving Elephant’s first international guest, Avi Woolf.  Avi is a translator and editor whose work has been published in Arc Digital, Commentary, National Review, and The Bulwark.  He is chief editor of the online Medium publication Conservative Pathways, and hopes to help forge a path for a conservatism which is relevant for the 21st century while not abandoning the best of past wisdom.

 

In a four-part series appearing in Arc Digital, Avi laid out a detailed blueprint for how conservatism might be applied to cities.  A true conservative, Avi cautions that, while a “thin” understanding of conservatism might provide some value to cities, what’s sorely needed is a traditional conservatism that seeks to restore institutions and communities in our urban centers.  To do this, Avi recommends focusing on four broad conservative principles:

 

  1. Opportunity –Removing regulations and increasing opportunity for all city residents to live where they want, work how they want, learn where they want, and thrive as they wish.
  2. Social Pluralism – Embracing real diversity, of the sort conservatives fight for in universities, where atheists and fundamentalists, family values people and social libertines, and Americans of all kinds live together, find ways to get along, learn from each other, and work for the common good.
  3. Community – The approach of conservatives in city government should simply be this: Get out of the way. No forced development lumped on people unequally, but also no to zoning barriers and rules that prevent people from moving around.  Let—and even encourage—people to find ways to move around, to form bonds, and to create community.  If they need some material assistance, that’s fine—but at their request, not top down.
  4. Tradition – For too long, we have effectively given up on the idea of cities as places with a “sense of the sacred” and the eternal, in every sense from customs to silly jokes and accents to history. We need to change that.  Instead of places mired in presentism and opportunity solely for this generation’s residents or visitors, we need to think more carefully about creating cities which truly embody the covenant between the dead, the living, and the unborn that Burke spoke so highly about.