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Episode 55 - Identifying & Integrating the Personal Shadow

This Jungian Life

Release Date: 04/18/2019

Episode 162 - Tending the Ego-Self Axis: Reconnecting with Source show art Episode 162 - Tending the Ego-Self Axis: Reconnecting with Source

This Jungian Life

Erich Neumann publicly proposed the concept of the ego-Self (or Self-ego) axis and began to sketch its implications in his 1952 Eranos lecture, "The Psyche and the Transformation of the Reality Planes. Edward Edinger popularized the concept writing, "It portrays the developmental relationship between the ego and the Self, Jung’s term for “the totality of the conscious and unconscious psyche [that] transcends our visions…”

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Episode 161 - When Words Lose Their Meaning show art Episode 161 - When Words Lose Their Meaning

This Jungian Life

We are joined on the podcast by Dr. Bret Alderman, author of Symptom, Symbol, and the Other of Language: A Jungian Interpretation of the Linguistic Turn. He discusses with us the alienation and dissociation that results when we engage in a Promethean project to deconstruct language and its meaning. 

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Episode 160 - The Dark Side of Mothering show art Episode 160 - The Dark Side of Mothering

This Jungian Life

Our colleague Puddi Kullberg, author of The Bad Mother, joins us to acknowledge motherhood’s shadow. A link to her paper is below. Our culture idealizes motherhood, but mothers everywhere have experienced themselves as bad in varying ways and to various degrees.

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Episode 159 - The Alchemy of Writing show art Episode 159 - The Alchemy of Writing

This Jungian Life

The wellspring of consciousness has long been located in word. Once words were etched on clay or inked on papyrus, a new way of knowing was born. Writing ordered and expanded language, captured ideas, bloomed imagination, and preserved human experience.

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Episode 158 - The Phoenix: Life’s Transformative Fires show art Episode 158 - The Phoenix: Life’s Transformative Fires

This Jungian Life

The splendid-feathered phoenix lives for hundreds of years, builds its own funeral pyre, sets it on fire, and rises from the ashes after three days. The phoenix represents long life, conscious acquiescence to death, and assured regeneration. The fiery alchemical process of calcinatio leaves behind a white ash equivalent to salt, that which cannot be burned: life, soul, and Eros.

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Episode 157 - The Archetype of the Fool show art Episode 157 - The Archetype of the Fool

This Jungian Life

The fool in various guises has appeared since ancient times. The court jester seduces through comedy, song and story. The dummling son of fairy tales wins the treasure with well-meaning ineptitude. Shakespeare featured fools in many of his plays, the Tarot deck begins (or ends) with the fool, and comedians have built careers on playing the fool.

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Bonus Episode - MILKMAID REVELATIONS:  JUNG’S EROTIC STAMP COLLECTION show art Bonus Episode - MILKMAID REVELATIONS: JUNG’S EROTIC STAMP COLLECTION

This Jungian Life

Swiss Jungian scholar Jager Schmallzenburger has recently released news of the discovery of Jung’s erotic stamp collection. Found tucked into the wall behind a bookcase, the box of stamps features provocatively rendered images of milkmaids from countries around the world. The milkmaid, symbolic of the archetypal feminine in the flower of fulsome youth, has long been prominent in the mythopoetic imagination of man.

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Episode 156 - Exile & Alienation show art Episode 156 - Exile & Alienation

This Jungian Life

Exile and alienation could be considered the external and internal aspects of rejection. Exile is not chosen, but is imposed and unwanted: a relational break-up, job lay-off, or deportation. Exile can affect the human spirit so powerfully that the ancient Romans used it as an alternative to execution. Alienation describes an internal state of deadness and despair--an uncanny valley that feels featureless, gray, and unending.

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Episode 155 - A Comedian Walks into a Jungian Podcast… show art Episode 155 - A Comedian Walks into a Jungian Podcast…

This Jungian Life

Elliott Morgan, comedian and PhD candidate in depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute, joins us to explore humor and psyche. Elliott grew up a fundamentalist Christian in central Florida, and has gone from practicing holy laughter to creating HOLY SH*T, his comedy special on Amazon (also featuring Jung’s debut on the comedic stage).

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Episode 154 - Belonging: The Search for Home show art Episode 154 - Belonging: The Search for Home

This Jungian Life

Horses herd, birds flock, whales pod, and people tribe. The need to belong is as intrinsic to human nature as the need for food, touch, clothing and shelter. We belong to families, communities, ideas and ideals, yet must also separate from them in service to our own individuation.

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More Episodes

The personal shadow is created as a normal part of development, as we learn what behaviors, values and feelings are not acceptable in our family, school, or religious tradition. In order to be accepted by needed significant others, parts of ourselves have to be split off from consciousness and are therefore relegated to the unconscious as shadow. A major part of becoming more whole is discovering these exiled parts of ourselves and integrating the feelings they carry. Deb, Lisa and Joseph discuss some of the ways that shadow can be confronted and given a place at the table of consciousness.

 

The Dream:

I’m in my Dad’s wood shop, in the basement of the home where I grew up. I need to unscrew a panel on a metal box, and I’m finding the right screwdriver. The first one I pick up is too small, Mom hands me a better-sized one, a Phillips head with four fins. Somehow it is a very large size, and I notice the fins on the head are rusty. I sand away some of the rust on one of the fins, but when I come to the second, it is covered in masking tape. Instead of peeling off the tape, I try to sand away the masking tape, but the sandpaper continues to sand into the screwdriver fin itself, which is somehow made of corrugated cardboard. I am puzzled. I feel a pit in my stomach, like I’ve made a mistake. I find that only the first of the four fins is made of metal, the rest are cardboard. I “undo” (like you would on a computer) to get back to where I was after sanding the metal fin. The cardboard fins are intact again and I’m relieved. I then unscrew and open the panel of the box.