loader from loading.io

Episode 55 - Identifying & Integrating the Personal Shadow

This Jungian Life

Release Date: 04/18/2019

Episode 167 - Extroversion show art Episode 167 - Extroversion

This Jungian Life

Although Jung’s theory of typology is the foundation of various personality assessments, it is important to appreciate its profundity as Jung’s theory of consciousness. The four functions of consciousness--sensation, intuition, thinking and feeling--are governed by two attitudes, extraversion and introversion. Jung defines extraversion as “an attitude type characterized by concentration of interest on the external object.

info_outline
Episode 166 - The Power of NO show art Episode 166 - The Power of NO

This Jungian Life

Toddlers have ready access to no as they discover the power of me—the start of a lifelong process of differentiating self from all that is other. When are personal needs, desires, and selfhood the priority? When does caring about others, the need to belong, and toeing the line take precedence?

info_outline
Episode 165 - Risk & Reality: When Fear Traps Us show art Episode 165 - Risk & Reality: When Fear Traps Us

This Jungian Life

We can’t help knowing that something bad could happen if we do X…or Y…or maybe Z. Like Odysseus steering his ship between sea monsters Scylla and Charybdis, we must navigate between risk avoidance and recklessness. One keeps us out of life; the other jeopardizes wellbeing. In pre-modern times life in the external world was fraught with danger and risk; in the modern world, the consequences of risk are more often internal.

info_outline
Episode 164 - Assessing Your Values: Meaning & Motivation show art Episode 164 - Assessing Your Values: Meaning & Motivation

This Jungian Life

There is value in examining your values, the powerful emotional and cognitive attitudes that underlie large and small life choices. Although values are initially acquired through family and institutions, an important task of adulthood is consciously embracing traditional or individual values.

info_outline
Episode 163 - INTROVERSION show art Episode 163 - INTROVERSION

This Jungian Life

The terms introversion and extraversion, now cultural staples, originated with Jung and describe the overall direction of life energy. The widely used Myers-Briggs Typology Indicator (MBTI), now available online, is drawn directly from Jung’s theory of personality types. Although extraverts direct their energy outward, introverts direct their energy inward. External-world relationships and events tend to pale in comparison to ideas, internal images and reflective processes.

info_outline
Episode 162 - Tending the Ego-Self Axis: Reconnecting with Source show art Episode 162 - Tending the Ego-Self Axis: Reconnecting with Source

This Jungian Life

Erich Neumann publicly proposed the concept of the ego-Self (or Self-ego) axis and began to sketch its implications in his 1952 Eranos lecture, "The Psyche and the Transformation of the Reality Planes. Edward Edinger popularized the concept writing, "It portrays the developmental relationship between the ego and the Self, Jung’s term for “the totality of the conscious and unconscious psyche [that] transcends our visions…”

info_outline
Episode 161 - When Words Lose Their Meaning show art Episode 161 - When Words Lose Their Meaning

This Jungian Life

We are joined on the podcast by Dr. Bret Alderman, author of Symptom, Symbol, and the Other of Language: A Jungian Interpretation of the Linguistic Turn. He discusses with us the alienation and dissociation that results when we engage in a Promethean project to deconstruct language and its meaning. 

info_outline
Episode 160 - The Dark Side of Mothering show art Episode 160 - The Dark Side of Mothering

This Jungian Life

Our colleague Puddi Kullberg, author of The Bad Mother, joins us to acknowledge motherhood’s shadow. A link to her paper is below. Our culture idealizes motherhood, but mothers everywhere have experienced themselves as bad in varying ways and to various degrees.

info_outline
Episode 159 - The Alchemy of Writing show art Episode 159 - The Alchemy of Writing

This Jungian Life

The wellspring of consciousness has long been located in word. Once words were etched on clay or inked on papyrus, a new way of knowing was born. Writing ordered and expanded language, captured ideas, bloomed imagination, and preserved human experience.

info_outline
Episode 158 - The Phoenix: Life’s Transformative Fires show art Episode 158 - The Phoenix: Life’s Transformative Fires

This Jungian Life

The splendid-feathered phoenix lives for hundreds of years, builds its own funeral pyre, sets it on fire, and rises from the ashes after three days. The phoenix represents long life, conscious acquiescence to death, and assured regeneration. The fiery alchemical process of calcinatio leaves behind a white ash equivalent to salt, that which cannot be burned: life, soul, and Eros.

info_outline
 
More Episodes

The personal shadow is created as a normal part of development, as we learn what behaviors, values and feelings are not acceptable in our family, school, or religious tradition. In order to be accepted by needed significant others, parts of ourselves have to be split off from consciousness and are therefore relegated to the unconscious as shadow. A major part of becoming more whole is discovering these exiled parts of ourselves and integrating the feelings they carry. Deb, Lisa and Joseph discuss some of the ways that shadow can be confronted and given a place at the table of consciousness.

 

The Dream:

I’m in my Dad’s wood shop, in the basement of the home where I grew up. I need to unscrew a panel on a metal box, and I’m finding the right screwdriver. The first one I pick up is too small, Mom hands me a better-sized one, a Phillips head with four fins. Somehow it is a very large size, and I notice the fins on the head are rusty. I sand away some of the rust on one of the fins, but when I come to the second, it is covered in masking tape. Instead of peeling off the tape, I try to sand away the masking tape, but the sandpaper continues to sand into the screwdriver fin itself, which is somehow made of corrugated cardboard. I am puzzled. I feel a pit in my stomach, like I’ve made a mistake. I find that only the first of the four fins is made of metal, the rest are cardboard. I “undo” (like you would on a computer) to get back to where I was after sanding the metal fin. The cardboard fins are intact again and I’m relieved. I then unscrew and open the panel of the box.