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The Fire at the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro

AHR Interview

Release Date: 02/04/2019

Karlos Hill on Community Engaged History show art Karlos Hill on Community Engaged History

AHR Interview

Historian Karlos Hill speaks about his article “Community Engaged History: A Reflection on the 100th Anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.”

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Alyssa Sepinwall and Andrew Denning on Historical Video Games show art Alyssa Sepinwall and Andrew Denning on Historical Video Games

AHR Interview

AHR author Andrew Denning speaks with historian Alyssa Sepinwall about historical video games and gaming history. Sepinwall is the author of the forthcoming book Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games. Denning’s AHR article, “Deep Play? Video Games and the Historical Imaginary,” appears in the March 2021 issue along with a cluster of reviews on the video game series “Assassin's Creed.”

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An AHR Conversation on Black Internationalism show art An AHR Conversation on Black Internationalism

AHR Interview

This episode features a March 2, 2021, Virtual AHA session that hosted a discussion of the recent AHR Conversation on Black Internationalism, which appeared in the December 2020 issue of the AHR.

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Jessica Marie Johnson on the History of Atlantic Slavery and the Digital Humanities show art Jessica Marie Johnson on the History of Atlantic Slavery and the Digital Humanities

AHR Interview

In this episode, AHR Consulting Editor Lara Putnam speaks with Johns Hopkins University historian Jessica Marie Johnson about the intersection of the history of Atlantic slavery and the Atlantic African diaspora and the digital humanities. Johnson’s recent book, Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World, was published in 2020 by the University of Pennsylvania Press.

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Merle Eisenberg and Lee Mordechai on the Plague Concept show art Merle Eisenberg and Lee Mordechai on the Plague Concept

AHR Interview

Merle Eisenberg and Lee Mordechai discuss their article “The Justinianic Plague and Global Pandemics: The Making of the Plague Concept,” which appears in the December 2020 issue of the AHR.

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Monica H. Green on The Four Black Deaths show art Monica H. Green on The Four Black Deaths

AHR Interview

In this episode we speak with Monica H. Green, a historian of medicine and global health, about her article, “The Four Black Deaths,” which appears in the December 2020 issue of the AHR. In it, Green draws on work in paleogenetics and phylogenetics alongside documentary evidence to suggest both a broader and more nuanced understanding of how plague spread in the late medieval world.

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Ari Joskowicz on His Article “The Age of the Witness and the Age of Surveillance” show art Ari Joskowicz on His Article “The Age of the Witness and the Age of Surveillance”

AHR Interview

Historian Ari Joskowicz discusses “The Age of the Witness and the Age of Surveillance: Romani Holocaust Testimony and the Perils of Digital Scholarship,” which appears in the October 2020 issue of the AHR.

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Ian Milligan Discusses His Book History in the Age of Abundance? show art Ian Milligan Discusses His Book History in the Age of Abundance?

AHR Interview

In this first episode of the fourth season of the podcast, we speak with historian Ian Milligan about his 2019 book History in the Age of Abundance?: How the Web Is Transforming Historical Research.

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Submitting Your Work to the AHR show art Submitting Your Work to the AHR

AHR Interview

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to submit an article to the AHR, how the review process works, how best to frame your submission, or what type of work the AHR is most interested in? In this special episode of AHR Interview, we invited three recent AHR authors to discuss precisely these questions. Our guests are Carina Ray of Brandeis University, Sana Aiyar of MIT, and Marc Hertzman of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

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Julia Gaffield on Julius S. Scott’s The Common Wind show art Julia Gaffield on Julius S. Scott’s The Common Wind

AHR Interview

Adam McNeil interviews Georgia State University historian Julia Gaffield about the legacy and ongoing influence of Julius S. Scott’s The Common Wind: Afro-American Currents in the Age of the Haitian Revolution.

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One of the late-breaking sessions at this year’s AHA Annual Meeting dealt with the devasting fire that engulfed Brazil’s Museu Nacional in September 2018. The session was titled “Archives Burning: The Fire at the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro and Beyond.” We spoke with three of the participants just after the panel concluded: Natalia Sobrevilla Perea, Seth Garfield, and Mariza de Carvalho Soares. Natalia Sobrevilla Perea is Professor of Latin American History at University of Kent. She is the author of the book The Caudillo of the Andes: Andrés de Santa Cruz, which was published in English by Cambridge University Press in 2011 and in Spanish by the Instituto de Estudios Peruanos in 2015. Seth Garfield is Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of the 2001 book Indigenous Struggle at the Heart of Brazil: State Policy, Frontier Expansion, and the Xavante Indians, 1937–1988, and the 2013 In Search of the Amazon: Brazil, the United States, and the Nature of a Region, both published Duke University Press. Mariza de Carvalho Soares recently retired from her position as Associate Professor of History at the Universidade Federal Fluminense in Rio de Janeiro and has more recently served as the curator of the African collection at the Museu Nacional. She is the author of People of Faith: Slavery and African Catholics in Eighteenth-Century Rio de Janeiro, published in English in 2011 by Duke University Press. The panel also included Kirsten Weld from Harvard University and the session chair, Bianca Premo from Florida International University.