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Deadly Sex Objects in The Stepford Wives

Alienating the Audience

Release Date: 12/31/2020

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Alienating the Audience

"Watchmen" kicks off with the Tulsa Race Massacre, which defines the central theme of the rest of the series: race. Hannibal Johnson is the author of “Black Wall Street 100–An American City Grapples With Its Historical Racial Trauma,” as well as the host of "Black Wall Street Remembered." 

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Alienating the Audience

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Alienating the Audience

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Alienating the Audience

In "Clans of the Alphane Moon" by Philip K. Dick, a planet is colonized as an insane asylum, then abandoned, so that its inmates develop their own society and cultures.

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Alienating the Audience

"Mad Max: Fury Road" is the height of post-apocalyptic wasteland glam--everyone is really getting into skulls, cars, and neo-Viking lore. Not to mention it may be the greatest feminist film in science fiction. 

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Alienating the Audience

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Deadly Sex Objects in The Stepford Wives show art Deadly Sex Objects in The Stepford Wives

Alienating the Audience

“The Stepford Wives” (1975) is a satirical horror film about spunky urban wives getting replaced by their husbands with submissive, ornamental robots. Chris and Cristi Moody come on to talk about the unease captured by the movie in a time of gender roles tumult, 1950s conformity, Second Wave Feminism, and parallels to “Get Out.”

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Alienating the Audience

Nick and Heaton visit Kashyyyk to work as mall santas for Life Day on the Wooki homeworld.

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The Villainess from The Villainess from "Ex Machina"

Alienating the Audience

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Alienating the Audience

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“The Stepford Wives” (1975) is a satirical horror film about spunky urban wives getting replaced by their husbands with submissive, ornamental robots. Chris and Cristi Moody come on to talk about the unease captured by the movie in a time of gender roles tumult, 1950s conformity, Second Wave Feminism, and parallels to “Get Out.”