loader from loading.io
Ep. 101 – Hamilton’s National Bank 101 show art Ep. 101 – Hamilton’s National Bank 101

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

In creating the new country, our Founders were led by Alexander Hamilton in creating a financial system that would become the envy of the world.  In creating this system, Hamilton did four important and interrelated things-fund the national debt, assumption of state war debt, defined US dollar in terms of gold and silver and established the First Bank of the United States.  To accomplish this last item, Hamilton had to make an argument that the bank was constitutional as a central bank was not an enumerated power.  Join our panel and guest Bob Wright with the American Institute...

info_outline
Ep. 100 – Adam Smith and the Wealth of Nations 101 show art Ep. 100 – Adam Smith and the Wealth of Nations 101

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Did you know much of our modern theories on economics have roots with a 18th century Scotsman? Adam Smith wrote “An Inquiry Into The Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations” in 1776 and we still are impacted by his work today. He explored the ideas that we act out of our self-interest, incentives, division of specialized labor and productivity. These issues are highly relevant today! Join our panel and all-star academic Dr. Roberta “Bobbi” Herzberg for this discussion on this prolific author.

info_outline
Ep. 99 – The American Economy 101 show art Ep. 99 – The American Economy 101

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Have you ever thought about the role our government plays in our economy? Does our constitution protect economic liberty? Do you have the right to buy and sell at the price you set? Can you borrow and lend? Do we have a right to transact anonymously? All of these questions play a role in whether or not our country sustains economic growth. Join our special guest John Cochrane, otherwise known as “The Grumpy Economist”, and our panel as we examine the relationship between our government and our econom

info_outline
Ep. 98 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Wrap-up Episode: Overview of the American Court System show art Ep. 98 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Wrap-up Episode: Overview of the American Court System

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

We were all taught in school that the US Constitution is the supreme law of the land. But how is that supreme law to be interpreted? For example, what view do we take when the Constitution says the president must be a “natural born citizen?” What’s the difference between originalism and living constitutionalism? Join our panel and constitutional expert Ed Whelan, Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, for this conversation as we wrap up our dive into the American Court Sy

info_outline
Ep. 97 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Military Courts show art Ep. 97 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Military Courts

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Along with local, state and federal courts, we have another court most of us will never experience. The military has its own court system based on the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Some elements of the UCMJ are similar to civilian courts, like laws against murdering and stealing, but it differs with laws pertaining to a solider being absent without leave (AWOL). Join our panel and Cpt. Charles Stimson, Commanding Officer of the Preliminary Hearing Unit, for this discussion on military courts.

info_outline
Ep. 96 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Local Courts: Municipal, County, Traffic, Drug show art Ep. 96 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Local Courts: Municipal, County, Traffic, Drug

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

We have a myriad of local state and federal courts handling our judicial process. Texas has 950 municipal courts, 800 justice courts, 528 county level courts, 483 state district courts, 14 court of appeals, one Texas Supreme Court and finally one Court of Criminal Appeals! And that is just in Texas! What does this all mean? What are the differences in jurisdictions between these courts? Join our panel and Judge Kimberly Fitzpatrick to find out!

info_outline
Ep. 95 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — The State Court System show art Ep. 95 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — The State Court System

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

When you think of our court system, do you think of the Supreme Court? While federal courts generate the most headlines, most judicial activity is in state courts? In 2018, 83.8 million cases were filed in state court while 359,000 cases were filed in federal court. We have over 30,000 state court judges across the country and 870 federal judges. Why do we have state courts and how are they structured? Join our panel and guest, Judge Kenton Skarin with Illinois’ 18th Judicial Circuit for these answers!

info_outline
The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Federal Courts: Appeals Courts and District Courts show art The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Federal Courts: Appeals Courts and District Courts

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

It’s the early years of our country. After a lengthy legal career you become a Supreme Court Justice. You get on your horse and travel hundreds of miles around your “circuit” to hear appeals cases. That was once the responsibility of the Justices! What exactly are Federal District Courts, Circuit Courts, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit? Join our panel and special guest, Senior Fellow with the National Center for Public Policy Research Horace Cooper, as we examine our federal courts.

info_outline
The American Court System: How DOES It Work? -The Appointment and Election of Judges show art The American Court System: How DOES It Work? -The Appointment and Election of Judges

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Some judges are elected, some appointed and others go through lengthy senate hearings broadcast on C-SPAN. Why is that? The Founders wanted federal judges to be insulated from political influences so they are given lifetime appointments and generous pensions. State judges rule on issues closer to the people so it makes sense some are elected by the people their rulings affect. Join our panel and guest, Carrie Severino with the Judicial Crisis Network, for this look into how judges are chosen.

info_outline
The American Court System-How Does It Work? A History of the Supreme Court show art The American Court System-How Does It Work? A History of the Supreme Court

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Our Constitution dates back over two centuries with few changes. The Founders knew the Supreme Court would not be the most powerful of the branches. Hamilton explained the President has the sword, Congress has the purse and the Supreme Court has judgement. The Court’s power comes from judgement and reasonability of their action, not coercion and force. Join our panel and Professor John Yoo, former Deputy Assistant Attorney General, for this insightful discussion into the practices of our highest court.

info_outline
 
More Episodes

When you decide to take an action, do you seek permission to take that action or look for a prohibition against it?  The difference is substantial.  Anti-Federalists supported a Bill of Rights in the Constitution as they viewed it as a list of rights that should be retained by the people in the new government.  They were concerned that through the Supremacy Clause, the US Constitution would overrule state constitutions.  The Federalists did not view the Bill of Rights as necessary, believing the checks and balances sufficient to protect our individual liberty, and argued that an enumeration of “we the peoples’” rights would give the government permission to take over in areas not listed.  The Federalists feared a Bill of Rights might actually harm individual liberty.  What do you think?  Join our panel and Constitutional expert Tara Ross for this powerful discussion.