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Ep. 95 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — The State Court System show art Ep. 95 – The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — The State Court System

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

When you think of our court system, do you think of the Supreme Court? While federal courts generate the most headlines, most judicial activity is in state courts? In 2018, 83.8 million cases were filed in state court while 359,000 cases were filed in federal court. We have over 30,000 state court judges across the country and 870 federal judges. Why do we have state courts and how are they structured? Join our panel and guest, Judge Kenton Skarin with Illinois’ 18th Judicial Circuit for these answers!

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The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Federal Courts: Appeals Courts and District Courts show art The American Court System: How DOES It Work? — Federal Courts: Appeals Courts and District Courts

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

It’s the early years of our country. After a lengthy legal career you become a Supreme Court Justice. You get on your horse and travel hundreds of miles around your “circuit” to hear appeals cases. That was once the responsibility of the Justices! What exactly are Federal District Courts, Circuit Courts, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit? Join our panel and special guest, Senior Fellow with the National Center for Public Policy Research Horace Cooper, as we examine our federal courts.

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The American Court System: How DOES It Work? -The Appointment and Election of Judges show art The American Court System: How DOES It Work? -The Appointment and Election of Judges

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Some judges are elected, some appointed and others go through lengthy senate hearings broadcast on C-SPAN. Why is that? The Founders wanted federal judges to be insulated from political influences so they are given lifetime appointments and generous pensions. State judges rule on issues closer to the people so it makes sense some are elected by the people their rulings affect. Join our panel and guest, Carrie Severino with the Judicial Crisis Network, for this look into how judges are chosen.

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The American Court System-How Does It Work? A History of the Supreme Court show art The American Court System-How Does It Work? A History of the Supreme Court

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Our Constitution dates back over two centuries with few changes. The Founders knew the Supreme Court would not be the most powerful of the branches. Hamilton explained the President has the sword, Congress has the purse and the Supreme Court has judgement. The Court’s power comes from judgement and reasonability of their action, not coercion and force. Join our panel and Professor John Yoo, former Deputy Assistant Attorney General, for this insightful discussion into the practices of our highest court.

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Can States Control Their Own Borders? show art Can States Control Their Own Borders?

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Did you know 17 states have an international border? The U.S. Constitution delegates border enforcement issues to the executive branch but what are states to do if those federal laws are not being adequately enforced?  Join our panel, moderated by Constituting America founder and co-chair Actress Janine Turner, with students, and our expert guest: former Justice Department Senior Advisor to the US Attorney General Gene Hamilton for this insightful discussion.

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The Gabby Petito Tragedy. Obtaining the Laundrie Warrant Sooner? The Role of the 4th & 5th Amendments Straight show art The Gabby Petito Tragedy. Obtaining the Laundrie Warrant Sooner? The Role of the 4th & 5th Amendments Straight

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

A social media personality goes missing, found deceased and her fiancé is a suspect. With so many unanswered questions, we have reexamined interactions with the police in the days preceding her disappearance. Could they have done more? Could the fiancé have been detained? The Bill of Rights sets the framework for police through the 4th and 5th amendments. Join our panel and former federal prosector Charles Stimson as we examine the legal circumstances in this case and criminal procedure.

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Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 13: The Anti-Federalist and Federalist Debate Still Rages Today  show art Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 13: The Anti-Federalist and Federalist Debate Still Rages Today

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

For 13 weeks, we continued a conversation that began over 200 years ago between Federalists and Anti-Federalists. Why? It’s because we belong in a community. The Preamble does not begin with “I, the individual” but “We, the people.” In this conversation we realize our natural tendencies to join groups, quarrel and ask questions. We gravitate towards power so we divide it to prevent its corrupting tendency. Join Professor Gordon Lloyd from Pepperdine University and our panel as we continue this con

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Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 12: The Role of the Judiciary: Brutus XV and Federalist 78 show art Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 12: The Role of the Judiciary: Brutus XV and Federalist 78

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Brutus XV argues the Supreme Court will be too powerful because it can interpret the Constitution and decisions cannot be overturned. In Federalist 78, Hamilton argued it would not be the most powerful branch but the least dangerous because it cannot make or enforce laws. He argued court's power is limited and does not give the court supremacy but rather independence. What do you think? Is the Supreme Court too powerful? Join our panel and Dr. Jeffrey Sikkenga of the Ashbrook Center for this discussion.

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Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 11: Is a Bill of Rights Necessary? Federal Farmer IV, James Wilson’s State House Speech, and Federalist 84  show art Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 11: Is a Bill of Rights Necessary? Federal Farmer IV, James Wilson’s State House Speech, and Federalist 84

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Anti-Federalists supported a Bill of Rights as they viewed it as a list of rights that should be retained by the people. The Federalists did not view it as necessary, believing checks and balances sufficient to protect our individual liberty, and argued an enumeration of “we the peoples’” rights would allow government to take over in areas not listed.  They feared it might actually harm individual liberty.  What do you think?  Join our panel and Constitutional expert Tara Ross for this powerful dis

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Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 10: The Powers of the New Government: Brutus V, Agrippa VII and Federalist 45 show art Anti-Federalist Paper Series-Ep. 10: The Powers of the New Government: Brutus V, Agrippa VII and Federalist 45

Constitutional Chats hosted by Janine Turner and Cathy Gillespie

Should power rest with states or with the fed government? The Articles of Confederation did an incomplete job in assigning powers so The Founders held a Constitutional Convention. Brutus and Agrippa felt the “common defense and general welfare” clause in the new constitution was broad. Federalist 45 responded with the power of the government are few and defined while state's power are many and undefined. Join our panel and Gordon Lloyd for this week’s discussion that still has profound relevance.

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More Episodes

Did you know 17 US states have an international border?  The intersection of empathy and rule of law has been front and center in the news over the last few months as the debate over our immigration laws was reignited.  While we feel both sympathy from those traveling thousands of miles against dangerous odds to get here, we also have to respect our rule of law.  The U.S. Constitution delegates border enforcement issues to the executive branch of the national government, but what are states to do if those federal laws are not being adequately enforced?  Join our panel, moderated by Constituting America founder and co-chair Actress Janine Turner, with students, and our expert guest: former Justice Department Senior Advisor to the US Attorney General Gene Hamilton for this insightful discussion.