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Ep. 122 - Our Special Flag Day Episode with Ep. 122 - Our Special Flag Day Episode with "Betsy Ross" Herself!

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

It has 13 stars on a blue background and 13 stripes of alternating red and white. Our country’s first flag was a rallying symbol during the American Revolution. But what do you know about the woman who made the flag, Betsy Ross? A devout Quaker, she was a young widow when her late husband’s uncle, Declaration of Independence signer George Ross, tasked her with making the flag. On National Flag Day, Constituting America proudly presents a conversation with Betsy Ross, skillfully played by Kim Hanley with the American Historical Theater. Join our panel for this one-of-a-kind living history...

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Ep. 123 - What Is the Semiquincentennial? Our Independence Day Episode! show art Ep. 123 - What Is the Semiquincentennial? Our Independence Day Episode!

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

In four years we will celebrate the biggest birthday our country has ever seen.  In fact, planning for this birthday celebration began in 2016!  That year, President Obama signed into law H.R. 4875, legislation which formally created the United States Semiquincentennial Commission to plan the commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of the United States.  Constituting America co-founder Cathy Gillespie is proud to be 1 of the 16 private citizen members of the commission! Join our student panel as we welcome Joe Daniels, President and CEO of the America 250...

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Ep. 121 — How Republics Elect Heads of Government show art Ep. 121 — How Republics Elect Heads of Government

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

During election cycles Americans often debate the value of the Electoral College.  Not every citizen understands why the Founders created it, how it works today, and why it is so important to the stability of our Nation.  Mr. Maibach traces its origin to the Constitutional Convention held in Philadelphia in the summer of 1787.  The Electoral College was a compromise between the 9 small states and the 4 most populous states when they met in Philadelphia.  The Electoral College is designed so that citizens of each state vote for their choice for President, and the aggregation...

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Ep. 120 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Partisanship show art Ep. 120 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Partisanship

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

Madison defined it in Federalist No. 10.  George Washington cautioned against it in his Farewell Address.  What we call partisanship today, the Founders called faction.  And they were concerned with its prevalence in politics.  In their desire to create a government that featured reason over passion, the Founders were acutely aware of the negative effects faction brings.  What can we do about it?  Join our panel and guest William Morrisey, Professor Emeritus at Hillsdale College, for this discussion in partisanship and faction.

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Ep. 119 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Anarchy show art Ep. 119 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Anarchy

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

Imagine this. You are designing a new country and have a coin in your hand to flip. One side is anarchy and the other is tyranny. What do you do?  You flip the coin and try to get it to land on its side. This is what our Founders were aiming for when creating our country.  We are happy to have Professor Gordon Lloyd of Pepperdine University with our student panel as we discuss everything from the whigs and worries, bi-annual vs annual elections, how order falls into tyranny and liberty falls into anarchy, Socrates, the Athenian assembly, and virtue.  Join us as we unpack a lot...

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Ep. 118 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Utopian Thought show art Ep. 118 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Utopian Thought

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

Have you ever thought about our Constitution as a practical exercise in governance rather than an academic exercise?  What that means is the Constitution addresses real problems accounting for human nature rather than viewing men through a utopian lens as virtuous “angels.”  In Federalist 51, Madison tells us “if men were angels, no government would be necessary.”  Join our panel and Professor Joerg Knipprath as we explore how the Founders were realists who dealt with real people and real problems. Thank you to this week's sponsor: Bob DeMartino of

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Ep. 117 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of the Roman Republic show art Ep. 117 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of the Roman Republic

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

The Roman Empire, at its peak, spread from the Persian Gulf to England and encompassed all of the land adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea.  How could an empire so large and powerful ultimately fall?  What lessons from the Empire’s fall did our Framers recognize to influence the structure of our own country?  According to our guest, Professor Joerg Knipprath of Southwestern Law School, one of the reasons for Rome’s fall was that it simply got too big to govern itself. For a deeper explanation, join Professor Knipprath and our panel as he dives into the governmental structures...

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Ep. 116 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Dictators show art Ep. 116 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Dictators

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

How did two 17th century European philosophers shape the various systems of government we see worldwide? Thomas Hobbes believed stability relied on a “Leviathan” government, an all powerful state to maintain order.  John Locke wrote about unalienable rights and the role of government in protecting those rights.  Authoritative countries like Russia, China and North Korea follow the “Leviathan” model while democracies and republics follow Locke.  While the United States is not the world’s first republic, our Founders studied the Greeks, the Romans and Italian city-states...

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Ep. 115 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Monarchy show art Ep. 115 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Monarchy

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

When you think of a monarch, what comes to mind? Castles, moats and leading an entire country? Perhaps pomp and circumstance and a fancy throne? Have you ever thought about monarchies as perhaps the original form of government? In this chat with Professor Joerg Knipprath, our panel discusses the pros and cons of monarchies, how they can devolve into tyranny and how our Framers studied past civilizations in creating our country to avoid the pitfalls of monarchies. 

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Ep. 114 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Greece’s Democracy show art Ep. 114 — Avoiding the Pitfalls of Greece’s Democracy

Constitutional Chats Presented By Constituting America

Did you know the ancient Athenian Democracy was a pure democracy in that citizens directly voted rather than through representatives?  However, only a few people, around 10,000, earned the title of “citizen.”  The Founders of our country studied this and recognized the perils of the Athenian Democracy and other past regimes and democracies.  By studying history, they navigated these pitfalls in establishing our country as a republic.  Join our student panel and special guest, Dr. Christoper Burkett with Ashland University as we explore the three major problems in the...

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Did you know the ancient Athenian Democracy was a pure democracy in that citizens directly voted rather than through representatives?  However, only a few people, around 10,000, earned the title of “citizen.”  The Founders of our country studied this and recognized the perils of the Athenian Democracy and other past regimes and democracies.  By studying history, they navigated these pitfalls in establishing our country as a republic.  Join our student panel and special guest, Dr. Christoper Burkett with Ashland University as we explore the three major problems in the Athenian Democracy and how the Founding Fathers structured solutions in our republic.