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Indigenous Spirituality, New Age Spirituality

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Release Date: 01/30/2020

A New Look at American Spirituality show art A New Look at American Spirituality

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

According to the Fetzer Institute's recent study about  spirituality in the United States, 86% of survey respondents considered themselves spiritual; about 66% aspire to be more spiritual; and people who identify as spiritual are more liable to be civilly engaged and get involved in politics and vote. 

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Hack the Brain! show art Hack the Brain!

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Contemporary neuroscience is an essential ingredient in our understanding of human development, including our capacity for greater happiness and wisdom. In this podcast, author and educator Jim Hickman explains how our evolving understanding of the brain's functioning gives credence to the value of certain forms of spiritual practice, how spiritual practice "sculpts the brain," and how we can use what we're learning about the brain to develop enhanced cognitive, emotional and spiritual skills.

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The Mystic, the Psychic, the Paranormal show art The Mystic, the Psychic, the Paranormal

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

JeffreyJ J. Kripal mission is to extend religious scholarship into the realm of the preternatural. A professor and Associate Dean of Humanities at Rice University, he's pioneer in broadening religious studies to include things like mysticism, the paranormal and near-death experiences.

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Into the Mystic show art Into the Mystic

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Former pharmacist Paul Corson explains how his transcendental experiences fundamentally changed his way of being in the world. He shares his born-again experience, the nature of miracles and, the relationship between spiritual substance and the material world.

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The Sara Minkara Story show art The Sara Minkara Story

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Don't think of Sara Minkara as a blind person. Think of her as as person who is blind. Social activist, speaker, and a winner of multiple awards, the founder of the advocacy organization Empowerment for Integration (ETI) has never let used her absence of vision of an excuse or crutch. A Blind, Muslim, first-generation American, Sara Minkara has spent her life on a journey toward not only acceptance but also real empowerment—for herself and everyone she meets.

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"Touching the Jaguar"

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Author, activist and renegade economist John Perkins traces his journey from Peace Corps volunteer to co-founding the Pachamama Alliance, a non-profit devoted to establishing a world future generations will want to inherit. Perkins is best know for his best-selling book, Confessions of an Economic Hitman.

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Digital Disruptor: The Internet's Impact on Religion and Spirituality show art Digital Disruptor: The Internet's Impact on Religion and Spirituality

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Digital culture is transforming religion in multiple ways, from how people draw from multiple sources to define where they fit spiritually, to how they relate to institutional authority. According to Texas A&M Professor of Communication Heidi A. Campbell, the internet allows people to create their own religious tribe, apart from the confines of whatever congregation they belong.

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Galvanizing Change in this Pandemic Moment show art Galvanizing Change in this Pandemic Moment

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Most of us progressive-minded folks are members of multiple communities, be they religious, spiritual, environmental or political. What unites us are our values, the foremost of which is an innate sense of our sacred interdependence, or reverence for both the entirety of the interconnected web and all of its connected parts. This podcast explores the possibility of harnessing our energies for the full expression of the higher values that unite us: a project here called The Network of Light..

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Lucid Dreaming as a Pathway to the Divine show art Lucid Dreaming as a Pathway to the Divine

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Dream researcher Ryan Hurd explains how anyone can begin the process of working with their dreams, his studies on the impact of galantamine paired with meditation and dream reliving on subsequent dreams, and how dreams can be portals for the expansion of consciousness.

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Healing the Wounded Masculine show art Healing the Wounded Masculine

The podcast of the Sacred Inclusion Network

Men who exhibit toxic "Me Two" behavior are not just predators, but victims, says leadership coach and spiritual teacher Wendy C. Williams.

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More Episodes

Is there anything in common between how indigenous people experience of esoteric, spiritual phenomena and the contemporary New Agers who presume to be their heirs?

If anyone is qualified to begin to answer this question it's Michael F. Brown, a cultural anthropologist who's done a deep dive into both of these worlds. 

Back in the mid-1970s, Brown spent a year living with the Awajún also known as the Aguaruna), an indigenous people of the Peruvian jungle, whose ancestors had a reputation as fearsome headhunters and whose cosmology includes beliefs in shamanism and sorcery. 

Peru's Shining Path insurgency in the 1980s forced Brown to refocus his work elsewhere, to the study of the New Age phenomena of channeling, which was peaking around this time. Just as he immersed himself among the Awajún, Brown spent a season with the channels, their clients and audience. He documented what he discovered in his aptly titled book, The Channeling Zone: American Spirituality in an Anxious Age

In this wide-ranging conversation, Brown discusses his fieldwork in both of these milieu; sorcery and shamanism among the Awajún, cultural appropriation;  and the work of the School for Advanced Research (SAR). where he's been president since 2014. 

SAR advances creative thought and innovative work in the social sciences, humanities, and Native American arts.

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