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How Corruption Works in China

The Lawfare Podcast

Release Date: 07/24/2020

Merrick Garland vs. the Judiciary Committee with No Bull show art Merrick Garland vs. the Judiciary Committee with No Bull

The Lawfare Podcast

Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland faced the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday for a multi-hour session of questions and answers from senators. There were opening statements, there was a lot of speechifying, and there was posturing on the part of senators of both parties. We stripped it all out to bring you just the questions and the answers with no repetition.

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Alex Klass on the Texas Energy Crisis show art Alex Klass on the Texas Energy Crisis

The Lawfare Podcast

Texas has been struggling with a massive power outage caused by record low temperatures; millions have been without power, heat and running water, and at least dozens have died. Texas is unique in that its electricity is almost completely independent from the rest of the U.S. grid, and as the current crisis shows, Texas's energy exceptionalism comes at a cost. Alan Rozenshtein spoke with Alexandra Klass about the current situation and the future of energy policy, both for Texas and for the United States.

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Trust, Software and Hardware show art Trust, Software and Hardware

The Lawfare Podcast

David Hoffman is associate general counsel and global privacy officer for the Intel Corporation, as well as the Steed Family Professor of Practice in Cybersecurity Policy for Duke's Sanford School of Public Policy. He invited Benjamin Wittes to give a talk to a group of students about trust and technology development in which they discussed what the components of trust really are, how many of them are technical and how many of them involve other things like corporate governance.

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The Coup in Myanmar show art The Coup in Myanmar

The Lawfare Podcast

On February 1, Myanmar's military overthrew the country's democratically elected government in a coup and declared a state of emergency for a year. Since then, the country has seen daily peaceful protests and large-scale strikes against military rule, at times clashing with security forces who have been seen using tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse crowds. To break it all down, Rohini Kurup spoke with Aye Min Thant, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist based in Myanmar.

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Chinmayi Arun on India and the Future of the Internet show art Chinmayi Arun on India and the Future of the Internet

The Lawfare Podcast

Right now in India, there’s a legal battle that could portend the future of the internet. Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Chinmayi Arun, a resident fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and an affiliate of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University about one of the biggest stories about freedom of expression online today—the battle between Twitter and the Indian government.

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How the Impeachment Trial Ends show art How the Impeachment Trial Ends

The Lawfare Podcast

The second impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump is now over. It ended with a roar and then a whimper, and then a little bit of a roar again, as seven Republicans joined all of the Democrats to convict the former president. It wasn't enough, as the Senate needed 67 votes to convict and it only had 57, but it made a statement of sorts—or did it? To discuss the trial and its weird ending, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Quinta Jurecic, David Priess, Scott Anderson and Molly Reynolds.

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Iran, the U.S. and the Middle East at a Turning Point show art Iran, the U.S. and the Middle East at a Turning Point

The Lawfare Podcast

The Biden administration has promised significant changes to the U.S. relationship with Iran that could have a marked impact on the Middle East. To discuss these changes, David Priess hosted a panel discussion for the Michael V. Hayden Center for Intelligence, Policy and International Security at George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government, featuring Norman Roule, Kirsten Fontenrose and Ambassador Dennis Ross.

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Canada Takes on the Proud Boys show art Canada Takes on the Proud Boys

The Lawfare Podcast

Lost in the shuffle of an impeachment trial here in the United States was big news from Canada last week. Canada’s Minister of Public Safety added the Proud Boys to Canada’s terror entity list. The listing has all sorts of interesting legal and national security implications, so Jacob Schulz talked it through with two Canadian national security experts: Jessica Davis and Leah West.

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Ben Smith on Gatekeepers in the Internet Age show art Ben Smith on Gatekeepers in the Internet Age

The Lawfare Podcast

Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Ben Smith, media columnist for the New York Times and former editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed News. Ben spends a lot of time thinking and writing about the gatekeepers who hold the power to shape our public sphere. So what does Ben think about the current state of the media ecosystem and where it's headed? And why, in his view, was February 26, 2015—almost exactly 6 years ago—the last good day on the internet?

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An Update from Hong Kong show art An Update from Hong Kong

The Lawfare Podcast

Protestors in Hong Kong are being tried under the city's new Beijing-imposed national security law. For an update on what's going on in Hong Kong and in its relationship with China, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Sophia Yan and Alvin Cheung. They talked about how the national security law is being applied in Hong Kong, whether the protests are likely to reignite as the coronavirus epidemic fades and what activists are doing now that they do not know what Beijing will tolerate.

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More Episodes

Why has modern China prospered in spite of vast corruption? On this episode of ChinaTalk, Jordan Schneider talks with Yuen Yuen Ang, associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan, about her new book, "China's Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom and Vast Corruption." She draws comparisons between U.S. history and the China of today, arguing that access money in China functions like campaign finance in the States. They also discuss the implications of corruption for regime stability.