loader from loading.io

#2 Global Landscapes Forum IV, Economy and Peatlands

Muse Ecology

Release Date: 08/01/2018

#23 Life and Lithium at Thacker Pass show art #23 Life and Lithium at Thacker Pass

Muse Ecology

In this episode in the Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization series, we hear diverse voices from the resistance to the proposed lithium mine at Thacker Pass in northern Nevada, on Paiute and Shoshone ancestral lands.

info_outline
#22 Judith Schwartz and Walter Jehne: Climate Change Narrative Shift show art #22 Judith Schwartz and Walter Jehne: Climate Change Narrative Shift

Muse Ecology

In this conversation with author Judith Schwartz and scientist Walter Jehne, we discuss the importance of the shift from seeing the Earth as a resource base to seeing ourselves as enmeshed in a web of life that both manages and depends on natural processes.  In particular, we focus on how this perspective shift affects how we understand and are empowered to address anthropogenic climate change.

info_outline
#21 Paul Cereghino Part 2: Bioregional Restoration and Social Complexity show art #21 Paul Cereghino Part 2: Bioregional Restoration and Social Complexity

Muse Ecology

In this conversation with Paul Cereghino, we discuss some of the challenges of collaborating in groups and groups of groups to protect and restore the Earth, including such topics as the role of online interactions, the importance of place-based reality, benefits and pitfalls of systems like sociocracy, Covid complications, and much more.

info_outline
#20 Paul Cereghino Part 1:  Ecosystem Guild and Restoration Camping show art #20 Paul Cereghino Part 1: Ecosystem Guild and Restoration Camping

Muse Ecology

In this episode in the Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization series, we explore one of the great challenges on our way back to harmony:  humans.  Through the lens of his Ecosystem Guild and Restoration Camping project in western Washington State, Paul Cereghino and I discuss some of the interhuman and intergroup complexities of grassroots ecological restoration efforts.

info_outline
#19 The Mangrove Action Project show art #19 The Mangrove Action Project

Muse Ecology

In this episode we continue the Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization series with Alfredo Quarto, co-founder and international program director of the Mangrove Action Project.  In our conversation with Alfredo, we discuss the importance of mangrove ecologies, their devastation by the shrimp farming industry, and how the mangrove action project uses an approach called Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration to facilitate their natural regeneration.

info_outline
#18 Neal Spackman; The Business of Restoring the Earth show art #18 Neal Spackman; The Business of Restoring the Earth

Muse Ecology

We continue the Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization series with Neal Spackman, ecological restoration designer, regenerative entrepreneur, and bold visionary. Previously in this series, we heard how agriculture and development having long been destroying ecology and hydrology, causing disruptions of weather and climate systems, and leading to the fall of empires. Neal is working to change that ancient dynamic, by restoring ecological function and hydrology to regenerate economies and rainfall patterns.

info_outline
#17 Felipe Pasini, Syntropic Farming show art #17 Felipe Pasini, Syntropic Farming

Muse Ecology

Since millennia before the early states of Mesopotamia, farming has been a complexity-destroying process.  In this episode, we'll hear from Felipe Pasini about an agricultural approach called Syntropic Farming that reverses this process, facilitating greater ecological complexity while providing for human needs.

info_outline
#16 Li An Phoa, Drinkable Rivers show art #16 Li An Phoa, Drinkable Rivers

Muse Ecology

In this second episode in the Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization Series, I'm grateful to be able to share this inspiring conversation with Li An Phoa, creator of the Drinkable Rivers movement.  Li An is a scientist, activist, and river walker, working to mobilize watersheds to engage in citizen science and work together towards the return of drinkability to their river. 

info_outline
#15 Professor Millan Millan:  The Second Leg of Climate Change show art #15 Professor Millan Millan: The Second Leg of Climate Change

Muse Ecology

In this episode we learn about what Professor Millan Millan calls "the second leg of human-induced climate change", how our land use changes lead to major disruptions of weather and climate patterns, independently of changes due to warming from carbon emissions. 

info_outline
#14 Prelude to the Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization Series show art #14 Prelude to the Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization Series

Muse Ecology

In this prelude to the upcoming series dealing with Water, Life, Climate, and Civilization, we take a look at the historical and mythological roots of civilization's discord, and set the tone for the series with a new song and some poignant clips from the next three episodes that remind us of the dynamic complexity we are interconnected with.

info_outline
 
More Episodes

While largely unfamiliar to many, peatlands perform crucial funcions in Earth's carbon and water cycles.  For many centuries we have been draining peatlands to free up land for commodity agriculture, destroying these important living systems.  We now are growing aware of the effects of draining peatlands, and some folks are exploring ways to preserve and restore these wet ecologies while still being able to produce and harvest biomass and other crops from these areas.  This sort of peatland agriculture is called paludiculture.

In part 4 of this 5 part series at the Global Landscapes Forum in Bonn, Germany, we will hear John D. Liu interview 3 individuals who are working to change agriculture, finance, and policy so that they work to restore, rather than drain peatlands.

John D. Liu is Ecosystem Ambassador for Commonland Foundation and Visiting Research Fellow at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology of the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences.  He also catalyzed the Ecosystem Restoration Camps movement.  You can find his films and research papers at knaw.academia.edu/JohnDLiu

Jans Joosten, one of the world's foremost experts on peatlands, is head of the Department of Peatland Studies and Paleoecology of Greifswald University.  (http://greifswaldmoor.de/home.html)  He will describe how peatlands function and some of the consequences of draining them.  Through his research, writing, and policy advising he has helped to protect and restore peatlands all over the world.

Annawati van Paddenburg is Head of Sustainable Landscapes at the Investment and Policy Solutions Division of the Global Green Growth Initiative. (http://gggi.org/theme/sustainable-landscapes/)  With member countries in Latin America, Africa, and Asia-Pacific, she has worked on climate and food security and sustainable growth in forest, agriculture, coastal, and marine areas. 

Growing up in rural Indonesia, she is motivated by her observations of the destructive effects of business on the pristine landscapes of her childhood.  The Indonesian government has recently determined to rewet their drained peatlands, and she is working with them to develop commodity production business models that support both local communities and peatland ecologies.

Aldert van Weeren is a cattail farmer. (http://wetlandproducts.com/) After rewetting and restoring peatland areas, intending to sustainably harvest cattails for housing insulation, he found that he had legally created nature reserves and was not allowed to harvest from them.  He and others have been working to change these policies so that folks like him can restore and preserve peatland function while producing a nontoxic, renewable source of housing insulation.

Michael DiGiorgio recorded the banjo-bird jams I'm using in the intro and ending.  You can find his amazing nature art at mdigiorgio.com .  Mike says that if you'd like to buy the album of his nature-banjo jams, you can find his email on his website and he can mail you a CD.