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William Darity Jr. and Kirsten Mullen on Why It’s Time to Pay Reparations to Black Americans

Poverty Research & Policy

Release Date: 12/05/2023

José Loya On How Race, Gender, And Age affect Access To Mortgage Credit And The Implications For Inequality show art José Loya On How Race, Gender, And Age affect Access To Mortgage Credit And The Implications For Inequality

Poverty Research & Policy

Homeownership is one of the most common ways to accumulate wealth and promote intergenerational economic mobility in the United States. But even with laws and policies designed to ensure equal access to housing and financing, access to mortgage credit is far from equal. Factors like the race, gender, and age of the applicant can result in less favorable loan terms and higher rates of denial and default. discusses his research on how different demographic factors affect access to mortgage financing, and what policy and practice approaches might help to lessen inequity in this area. José Loya...

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Marci Ybarra on Challenges for Latina Mothers Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic show art Marci Ybarra on Challenges for Latina Mothers Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Poverty Research & Policy

COVID-19 interrupted life on multiple levels for many people regardless of race, economic class, or citizenship. For Latina mothers who either lacked legal status or were part of a mixed-status household, the pandemic intensified the challenges they faced even before this health and economic crisis. In their paper, “No Calm Before the Storm: Low-Income Latina Immigrant and Citizen Mothers Before and After COVID-19,” Dr. Marci Ybarra and Francia Mendoza Lua share insights gained through interviews with Latina moms in Chicago before and during the pandemic. Dr. Ybarra is...

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Jesse Rothstein On Ways To Reduce Intergenerational Poverty show art Jesse Rothstein On Ways To Reduce Intergenerational Poverty

Poverty Research & Policy

Experiencing poverty in childhood can hinder a person’s opportunities throughout their own lifetime, and those of their children and grandchildren as well. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recently released a report titled “.” For this episode, we're joined by Jesse Rothstein, who served as a member of the committee that produced the report. He shares the research and findings on several of the key drivers of intergenerational poverty that the committee identified and examined, as well as what policy approaches may help to interrupt the cycle and why that...

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Maretta McDonald on Wealth Inequality and Housing Values of Black Meccas in the New South show art Maretta McDonald on Wealth Inequality and Housing Values of Black Meccas in the New South

Poverty Research & Policy

Black Meccas are cities where it appears that Black communities thrive more-so than other places in the United States. However, the housing values of Black-owned properties in these areas are substantially lower compared to their white counterparts, revealing the presence of wealth inequality even in cities where Black people are thought to experience better overall economic well-being. In this episode, Dr. Maretta McDonald discusses her recent co-authored paper  Maretta McDonald is a 2022-2024 IRP National Poverty Fellow and an Affiliate Faculty of Sociology at Virginia Tech. Her...

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IRP Book Talk: Luke Shaefer on “The Injustice of Place: Uncovering the Legacy of Poverty in America” show art IRP Book Talk: Luke Shaefer on “The Injustice of Place: Uncovering the Legacy of Poverty in America”

Poverty Research & Policy

Where you live can affect the quality of education you receive, your chances of finding a good job, and even how long you might live. In their new book, “,” and his co-authors Kathryn Edin and Timothy Nelson create a new way of looking at poverty, called the Index of Deep Disadvantage. Their team spends time in and learns about the communities that have the worst scores, and find that legacies of profound racism, extractive big industry, and crumbling social infrastructure contribute to generations of people struggling to thrive. But even in these communities that face multiple layers of...

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Jessica Pac on the Effects of Child Poverty Reductions on Child Protective Services Involvement show art Jessica Pac on the Effects of Child Poverty Reductions on Child Protective Services Involvement

Poverty Research & Policy

Child Protective Services (CPS) involvement is common, especially for children experiencing poverty, or who are Black or Native American. About a third of children are subject to a CPS investigation before their 18th birthday, but research shows reducing child poverty could help change this. In this episode, Dr. Jessica Pac discusses the recent paper she co-authored titled,      Jessica Pac is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Professor Pac’s research broadly harnesses applied econometric and data science methods to...

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William Darity Jr. and Kirsten Mullen on Why It’s Time to Pay Reparations to Black Americans show art William Darity Jr. and Kirsten Mullen on Why It’s Time to Pay Reparations to Black Americans

Poverty Research & Policy

Reparations for Black Americans is not a new idea—before the U.S. Civil War had ended, there was a proposal to provide freed Black people with “40 acres and a mule.” That did not materialize, and in the ensuing century and a half, the Black descendants of formerly enslaved people have faced systemic injustices, discrimination, and violence. In this episode, Professor William “Sandy” Darity, Jr. and Kirsten Mullen explain what a meaningful reparations program for Black Americans would entail, how eligibility should be determined, and why the federal government is both the “culpable...

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Dayna Johnson on How Racism and Poverty Contribute to Sleep Disparities show art Dayna Johnson on How Racism and Poverty Contribute to Sleep Disparities

Poverty Research & Policy

Many people suffer from not getting enough sleep from time to time. But for many people of color and those who are living in low-income neighborhoods and housing, additional factors may contribute to chronic poor sleep quality. Those factors can have long-term impacts on their health and well-being, including higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, obesity, and depression.  In this episode, shares her research into how experiences of racism, variable work schedules, and neighborhood conditions contribute to sleep and health inequities for African Americans....

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Tiffany Green on How Charging Dads for the Medicaid Costs of Their Baby’s Birth Affects Child Support show art Tiffany Green on How Charging Dads for the Medicaid Costs of Their Baby’s Birth Affects Child Support

Poverty Research & Policy

Wisconsin is one of a few states with a Birth Cost Recovery program, which bills unmarried, non-custodial fathers for the birth costs of their child when the mother is on Medicaid. But the impacts of these policies on the children and both parents have not been studied closely.  In this episode,  discusses the report that she co-authored titled, “,” which draws on IRP’s . Tiffany Green is an associate professor in the Departments of Population Health Sciences and Obstetrics and Gynecology within the School of Medicine and Public Health at the University of...

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Jamila Michener on How State Interference with Local Housing Policy Impacts Tenant Health and Racial Equity show art Jamila Michener on How State Interference with Local Housing Policy Impacts Tenant Health and Racial Equity

Poverty Research & Policy

Whether renters have access to safe, high-quality housing has serious implications for health and health equity. Local housing policy often focuses on community residents’ particular needs, yet state law can preempt local ordinances, frequently with detrimental results. In this episode, discusses two of her recent papers, “” and ".” Jamila Michener is an Associate Professor of Government and Public Policy at Cornell University. She studies poverty, racism, and public policy, with a particular focus on health and housing. She is Associate Dean for Public Engagement at the Brooks School...

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Reparations for Black Americans is not a new idea—before the U.S. Civil War had ended, there was a proposal to provide freed Black people with “40 acres and a mule.” That did not materialize, and in the ensuing century and a half, the Black descendants of formerly enslaved people have faced systemic injustices, discrimination, and violence. In this episode, Professor William “Sandy” Darity, Jr. and Kirsten Mullen explain what a meaningful reparations program for Black Americans would entail, how eligibility should be determined, and why the federal government is both the “culpable and capable party.”

Sandy Darity is the Samuel Dubois Cook Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, African and African-American Studies, and Economics at Duke University. He is also an IRP Affiliate. Professor Darity's research focuses broadly on stratification; economics on inequality by race, class, and ethnicity; and the economics of reparations. Kirsten Mullen is a writer, folklorist, museum consultant, and lecturer whose work focuses on race, art, history, and politics. Together they are the authors of "From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century," and are also two of the editors of "The Black Reparations Project, A Handbook for Racial Justice."