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113 Nonviolence International

projectsavetheworld's podcast

Release Date: 05/26/2020

Episode 453 The Great Lakes and Algae show art Episode 453 The Great Lakes and Algae

projectsavetheworld's podcast

Brad Bass, a status professor of environment at the University of Toronto, has two projects. He studies the impact of fertilizer run-off to Lake Erie and other freshwater lakes. This problems creates toxins that may enter our drinking water. Fortunately, Brad can remove phosphorus from water, mainly with plants. Planting more trees in cities will reduce or eliminate floods. Brad is also interested in designing “vertical wetlands,” that clean the air and water by combining particular species of plants and animals or fish. He is mentoring high school and university students who like to do...

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Episode 452 Citizens Assemblies show art Episode 452 Citizens Assemblies

projectsavetheworld's podcast

Gisela Ruckert is active in Fair Vote Canada and an advocate of citizens assemblies as a deliberative process in democracies. Three other participants in this discussion, Joyce McMillan, Bernard Dreano, and the host Metta Spencer all had participated in the Helsinki Citizens Assembly during and immediately after the Cold War. The HCA was a self-selected group, unlike those of currently popular citizens assemblies, which as recruited through sortition, as are juries. HCA brought together Western peace activisits and pro-democracy dissidents in the Eastern bloc. For the video, audio podcast,...

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Episode 451 African Culture in the World show art Episode 451 African Culture in the World

projectsavetheworld's podcast

Brydon Gombay lived in Uganda for several years until the rise of Idi Amin made it necessary to leave. Martin Klein is a retired professor of African History, University of Toronto. Much of his research as a political scientist was in Senegal. We discuss the languages, music, philosophy, religion, and political dynamics of Africa, and the impact some of the leading cultural figures are having elsewhere in the world. For the video, audio podcast,, transcript and public comments: . Then share your own thoughts about this issue.

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Episode 450 Freedom of Expression show art Episode 450 Freedom of Expression

projectsavetheworld's podcast

James Turk is director of the Centre for Free Expression at the Toronto Metropolitan University. He discusses the difficulty of finding consistent criteria for evaluating the content of social media and regulating its decency and fairness. Indeed, freedom of speech is not absolute, but censorship is generally the worst way to manage it. Instead, it is more promising to look at such services as Twitter and Facebook as businesses and to develop business models that do not encourage the worst excesses. One way would be to encourage competition by allowing a person's material from one platform to...

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Episode 449 Memories of a Diplomat show art Episode 449 Memories of a Diplomat

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Ralph Lysyshyn has served as Canada's ambassador to NATO, Poland, Belarus, Russia, Uzbekistan, and Armenia (some of those concurrently). He was warned by a previous ambassador to Russia that some people in the military and security services will never accept Ukraine's independence and would try to overcome it someday. Now they have. We talk about Russia's nationalism, especially that of Putin, who is less under the influence of oligarchs now and closer to those nationalists. For the video, audio podcast, transcript, and public comments: . Then share your ideas on the public comments column...

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Episode 448 Blockchain and the Economy show art Episode 448 Blockchain and the Economy

projectsavetheworld's podcast

Hugo Benedetti is an economist and expert on blockchain currencies; Paul Werbos is an expert on all matter cyber, especially Artificial Intelligence; Maria Puerta Riera is a political scientist from Venezuela; Peter Venton is an economist. They are all concerned about the potential of crypto-currencies to destabilize the world's economic system, for blockchain technologies can enable levels of anonymity that preclude regulation and monetary adjustments to manage such factors as inflation. Blockchain also wastes huge amounts of energy and is harmful to climate. For the video, audio podcast,...

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Episode 447 Teaching Peace show art Episode 447 Teaching Peace

projectsavetheworld's podcast

Betty Reardon is a professor emeritus of peace education at the Teachers College, Columbia University. Hers was a graduate program, unlike the peace studies undergraduate program that Metta taught at U of Toronto. She notes gladly that the legitimacy of peace as a discipline has been achieved now, and that her graduates have gone on to do professional work in government, civil society organizations, and businesses. Nowadays she is working to help bring educated, professional Afghan women to the US and other countries. Evidently the younger Taliban want to educate girls, but the government is...

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Episode 446 Energy, Governance and War show art Episode 446 Energy, Governance and War

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Angella MacEwen, John Foster, and Francisco Wulff are all economists; Alex Belyakov is a Ukrainian journalist who covered the Chernobyl disaster. There was a debate about whether Canada's fossil fuels may help Europe transition away from Russian sources or whether nuclear power is a better solution. There was another debate about whether the democratic states should continue trading with regimes that do not try to protect human rights and democracy, or whether "we are all sinners," and therefore should not discriminate against countries that behave atrociously. For the video, audio podcast,...

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Episode 444 Sex, War, and Abortion show art Episode 444 Sex, War, and Abortion

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Malcolm Potts is a professor emeritus of public health who, as an obstetrician, was sent to Bangladesh in the 1960s to help thousands of women who had been raped and impregnated by soldiers during the recent war. Males (including male chimpanzees) are aggressive because testosterone increases violence and risky behavior. To create peace, he would like more women to be legislators. He says that when abortion is outlawed there is no change whatever in the numbers of abortions but an increase in the number of deaths from unsafe abortions. For the video, audio podcast, transcript and public...

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Episode 443 On Romania's Border show art Episode 443 On Romania's Border

projectsavetheworld's podcast

Anda Serban is a community organizer and peace activist in Costanza, Romania -- near the border of Ukraine. She describes the living conditions and uncertain plans of the refugees fleeing into her country, and the prospect that Putin's apparently successful use of nuclear weapons as a deterrent will increase the appetite of other countries for such arsenals of their own. For the video, audio podcast, transcript, and public comments: . Then you are welcome to post to our public comments column.

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More Episodes

Mubarak Awad was a Palestinian Christian psychotherapist who found that his clients did not need therapy; they needed freedom. So he founded a center for nonviolence, which the Israeli government did not appreciate -- since it created an effective nonviolent intifada. But the work continues, and Metta speaks with Awad and three other leaders in nonviolent resistance: Michael Beer, Andre Kamenshikov (working now from Kiev), and Yeshua Moser Puangsuwan (working from both Thailand and Canada). At least three of the people are optimistic about being able to continue their work, even in the hard post-covid economy.

https://youtu.be/DAInkwifZf4

This series of weekly discussions is produced by Peace Magazine (see http://peacemagazine.org) and Project Save the World (see http://tosavetheworld.ca). On the latter website, you are invited to comment on this podcast episode and endorse the Platform for Survival, a list of 25 public policy proposals that, if enacted, will markedly reduce the risk of the six most urgent threats to humankind.