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Bullet Space: 'We're Still Kickin!'

WFUV's Cityscape

Release Date: 08/28/2019

On the Farm show art On the Farm

WFUV's Cityscape

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, a lot of people have been leaving New York City for greener pastures, whether it be for a day trip or something more permanent. But, even within the big city you can find greener pastures, and we’re not just talking about Central Park and Prospect Park. New York City is home to a working farm with animals and everything.  On this edition of Cityscape, we're paying a virtual visit to the . We'll also talk with, who lives on a farm in the Catskills in upstate New York. Courtney is a chef, photographer, graphic designer and the author of The...

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On Location Tours Goes Virtual  show art On Location Tours Goes Virtual

WFUV's Cityscape

New York City has long been a backdrop for television shows and movies, making it an ideal place for someone like Georgette Blau. She’s the founder of s, an award-winning TV and movie tour company. But, one scene Georgette never expected to find herself in is the owner of a tour company in the midst of a pandemic. In this edition of Cityscape, Georgette shares how she’s rewriting the script for her company, including creating a Friends virtual tour to coincide with the 25th anniversary of the classic TV comedy.  

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House of Yes: 'Fun is not Cancelled'  show art House of Yes: 'Fun is not Cancelled'

WFUV's Cityscape

New York City is known as “the city that never sleeps.” But since the coronavirus pandemic hit, nightlife venues and organizations have had to go to bed, leaving venues struggling to stay afloat.  in Bushwick, Brooklyn is slowly awakening from its slumber, having recently reopened for outdoor activities. But, the venue, which has been described as a mix of “Studio 54 and Cirque du Soleil” is far from returning to normal.  We recently caught up with Kae Burke, one of House of Yes' founders, via Zoom. We talked about how House of Yes is doing amidst the pandemic, the origins of...

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Nightlife in the Pandemic show art Nightlife in the Pandemic

WFUV's Cityscape

New York City has long been known for its bustling nightlife scene. We're familiar with images of people dressed to the nines packed into posh clubs dancing the night away and jazz musicians performing before more intimate crowds at venues in Greenwich Village. But, the coronavirus pandemic has put the city that never sleeps to bed, leaving its vibrant nightlife scene in a deep slumber. Even as the city continues to re-open, it’s unlikely nightclubs, music venues and performance spaces will return to normalcy anytime soon. A group of individuals and venues associated with New York...

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Parallels Between COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS show art Parallels Between COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS

WFUV's Cityscape

COVID-19 and AIDS are, of course, different diseases, but those who have been on the front lines in the battle against HIV/AIDS see parallels between the crises. Our guest in this episode is Sharen Duke, Executive Director and CEO of . She joins us to talk about how the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic compare to now, and the challenges New Yorkers with HIV/AIDS and other chronic health conditions are facing with coronavirus.

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Checking In at the Mount Vernon Hotel show art Checking In at the Mount Vernon Hotel

WFUV's Cityscape

Today Lower Manhattan residents seeking to escape the city in the hot summer months may head to the Hamptons or the Jersey Shore, but in the 1800s, midtown Manhattan was the place to go for a quick getaway. Between 1826 and 1833,  on East 61st Street was the go-to place for New Yorkers looking to escape the hustle bustle of the city, which at the time extended only as far north as 14th Street. The hotel is now a museum. Unfortunately, the museum is temporarily closed to due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but its virtual doors are open. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently talked with...

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Checking In at the Mount Vernon Hotel show art Checking In at the Mount Vernon Hotel

WFUV's Cityscape

Today Lower Manhattan residents seeking to escape the city in the hot summer months may head to the Hamptons or the Jersey Shore, but in the 1800s, midtown Manhattan was the place to go for a quick getaway. Between 1826 and 1833,  on East 61st Street was the go-to place for New Yorkers looking to escape the hustle bustle of the city, which at the time extended only as far north as 14th Street. The hotel is now a museum. Unfortunately, the museum is temporarily closed to due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but its virtual doors are open. Cityscape host George Bodarky recently talked with...

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Parks and the Pandemic  show art Parks and the Pandemic

WFUV's Cityscape

For a lot of New Yorkers, the city’s parks have become sanctuaries, providing a much needed escape from the confines of their homes during the coronavirus pandemic. But advocates are concerned tough economic times ahead could mean less funding for our urban oases.  In this episode of Cityscape we'll hear from Adam Ganser, Executive Director of  and Michelle Luebke, Director of Environmental Stewardship with . 

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NYC's Long Intermission show art NYC's Long Intermission

WFUV's Cityscape

  The curtain is coming up on some aspects of life in New York City, but you can expect it to remain down on Broadway for a while longer due to the coronavirus pandemic.  And if you’re wondering how long a while is. Well, that remains to be seen. In this edition of Cityscape, we'll talk with Charlotte St. Martin, president of the , about the future of the Great White Way. We'll also hear from photographer , who has been traversing New York City to document life amidst the coronavirus pandemic. 

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Teaching in the Age of Coronavirus show art Teaching in the Age of Coronavirus

WFUV's Cityscape

This has been a school year like no other. When the coronavirus pandemic hit, schools were forced to switch to remote learning. But, the reviews on how that has gone over the last few months are mixed to say the least.    The organization  has been helping schools in some of New York City’s poorest districts navigate the challenges of having to quickly pivot to online learning, challenges the non-profit expects to continue into the new school year.   Lynette Guastaferro is CEO of Teaching Matters. Cityscape host George Bodarky talked with her about her...

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More Episodes

New York City is home to a variety of alternative art spaces, but perhaps none have a story like this.

In the mid-1980’s a group of squatters took over an abandoned building on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. They broke in using a sledgehammer and made the place their own, even putting on art shows and plays in the space. They called the location Bullet Space (find out why in this episode of Cityscape).

Andrew Castrucci and Alexandra Rojas are artists and residents of Bullet Space. Andrew’s been living there for over thirty years and was one of the original squatters. They recently took Cityscape on a tour of the building, and explained why Bullet Space is far from just another transformed tenement in the concrete jungle.