loader from loading.io

11 | Two-Time Olympic Gold Medalist and Freestyle Skier David Wise: High Hopes and Low Expectations

The Injured Athletes Club

Release Date: 07/11/2019

99 | Ballet Dancer Chyrstyn Fentroy: Exploring New Identities show art 99 | Ballet Dancer Chyrstyn Fentroy: Exploring New Identities

The Injured Athletes Club

“My parents are dancers, so I literally grew up in the studio. Ballet kind of goes hand in hand with my identity—I have always been Chyrstyn the ballet dancer. I didn't realize that until I had it taken away from me and I had to sit down and identify other things that I was interested in. Otherwise, what was I existing for? I think having the confidence of understanding a little bit more about what I want in life that's not just ballet, or what I represent more than just being a ballet dancer or being a pretty mover on stage, was helpful.”   is a principal dancer at the Boston...

info_outline
98 | Carrie Answers a Question: Stephanie’s Snag show art 98 | Carrie Answers a Question: Stephanie’s Snag

The Injured Athletes Club

“I'd really love to know how to stop comparing the athlete I was before injury to the athlete I am now. I had knee surgery 10 months ago, and even though I'm fully cleared for all activities I am really struggling to get back into a groove with running. Any type of speed work really isn't working for me and I just can't seem to get any speed back. I am so frustrated with my lack of progress and would love to know how I can get over it.” —Stephanie   This week, co-host and mental skills coach Carrie Jackson answers a question from listener Stephanie, who feels stuck comparing herself...

info_outline
97 | Carrie & Cindy Ease Your Fears of Reinjury show art 97 | Carrie & Cindy Ease Your Fears of Reinjury

The Injured Athletes Club

“One of the biggest challenges athletes face is trying to figure out if the pain that they're experiencing is pain that's a signal to stop or a pain that is okay to push through. Like, ‘When I feel this pain, if I push through, am I going to do further harm? Am I going to make things worse?’ The fear of re-injury helps you pay attention to your pain.   But when you are physically cleared to do your physical therapy, or cleared to get back to training and practice and return to competition, yet you're still struggling with that fear—now the fear is holding you back versus...

info_outline
96 | Carrie Answers Your Questions: Re-Finding Your Edge show art 96 | Carrie Answers Your Questions: Re-Finding Your Edge

The Injured Athletes Club

“I’d love to know how you ever get comfortable with pushing the limits, or pushing hard again, without being so scared of re-injury. I often feel that in my speed workouts, I’m holding back, afraid to see how hard I can push, because I’m scared, but I also don’t want to let that fear hinder my athletic development! How to strike a healthy balance of ‘fear’ I suppose or learning to listen to your body.” —Jessica   “How do I trust my body again, and how do I untangle what is purely mental (fear!) and what is physical (still rebuilding muscle)? How do I separate what...

info_outline
95 | Long Jumper Kate Hall-Harnden: Finding Strength in the Challenge show art 95 | Long Jumper Kate Hall-Harnden: Finding Strength in the Challenge

The Injured Athletes Club

[Having type 1 diabetes] comes with a lot of struggles, but I try to kind of embrace those struggles and learn from them and they help me grow. Having that perspective with type 1 helped me with my ACL recovery. Because I could say, ‘Alright, this is going to be one of the hardest times in my life, but in the long run, I will be stronger because of it.”   When the 2020 Olympics were first postponed, long jumper Kate Hall looked on the bright side—she’d have more time to train and prepare for the Olympic Trials, which would qualify her for the Games. But a week before her first...

info_outline
94 | Carrie Answers a Question: Family Matters show art 94 | Carrie Answers a Question: Family Matters

The Injured Athletes Club

“How can we communicate with our partners, friends, and family about how hard we are finding it to be injured and what we need in terms of emotional support? —Anna   “I have the same question: My husband is very helpful in doing physical tasks I still can't manage eight months after a trimalleolar pilon fracture, but he can't accept how severe this injury is, even though he has heard my surgeon explain it. He thinks it's just a broken ankle and thinks I should be back on the tennis court this summer, which is not going to happen since I can't even walk down the stairs properly and...

info_outline
93 | Paralympic Rugby Player and Coach Joe Delagrave: Defining Yourself show art 93 | Paralympic Rugby Player and Coach Joe Delagrave: Defining Yourself

The Injured Athletes Club

“Rugby is something I think about all the time. But then going like, if it's gone, am I okay? If it's ripped away, like my able-bodied football career was, am I okay? In that moment, I wasn't. I had to ask, who is Joe in this new life in a wheelchair, and what's my identity? ... I think that's an important piece too, where a lot of athletes—it might not be as devastating as a paralysis, but when they're going through that eight- to 12-month rehab or a two-year rehab, or whatever it is, that identity is gone for a minute there and they have to kind of fight through and ask themselves those...

info_outline
92 | Carrie Answers a Question: Louise’s Lament show art 92 | Carrie Answers a Question: Louise’s Lament

The Injured Athletes Club

“I loved the bit in the book where it gave ideas of how to respond to common messages or responses from people. I find it difficult to respond to the two following common comments I get about my injury journey:    1. You'll come out stronger    2. Your injury means you can concentrate on other things that are not your sport.” —Louise   This week, co-host and mental skills coach Carrie Jackson answers a question from listener Louise, who finds herself at a loss for words when people around her express these common sentiments.   In her response, Carrie...

info_outline
91 | Olympic Heptathlete Annie Kunz: Behave Your Way to Success show art 91 | Olympic Heptathlete Annie Kunz: Behave Your Way to Success

The Injured Athletes Club

“I obviously was devastated; there's no way around it. It hit me really hard, and I kind of allowed myself—I tend to do this when I'm going through something like emotional turbulence or something where I'm upset about something going on with my sport or personal life or whatever—I'm like, okay, I'm gonna give myself x amount of time to be sad. Lean into that. Cry it out, feel bad for yourself, like just all the things. And then when that time limit is over, it's like, all right, we did that, we grieved. Now, what can we control? What can we focus on moving forward?”   As a...

info_outline
90 | Carrie Answers a Question: Jennifer’s Journey show art 90 | Carrie Answers a Question: Jennifer’s Journey

The Injured Athletes Club

“How can you navigate injury when living alone? An initial challenge for me was being alone (no spouse, boyfriend) and close friends not in the same city. Realize this is not the case for most.   One of the biggest issues was physical navigation of surroundings on crutches, no one to help, which leaves one feeling very frustrated initially. The other is an enhanced sense of isolation because nobody is there to obtain feedback, throw water on any emotional fire or otherwise provide distraction, fill air time or offer security. Ironically, being alone provides a buffer from unwanted...

info_outline
 
More Episodes

When you’re on top of the world after a major victory—say, an Olympic gold medal (or two)—it’s relatively easy to think positively. But David Wise has had his fair share of challenges surrounding his greatest achievements. Through his work on mental skills, though, he’s learned to view each setback as a chance to soar higher. 

 

Most recently, this past May, he took a bad landing during a run in Austria and broke his femur. David allowed the filmmaker who was there to document his flips and spins, Justin Burgan, to focus his lens instead on the unfolding drama of uncertainty and recovery. 

 

Doing so made the transformation of obstacle into opportunity even more resonant for David. Through sharing his story, he found a new voice, speaking to all types of athletes and other individuals coping with challenges of their own. (You can watch the resulting videos here in a series he calls “Overcoming”; don’t worry, he doesn’t include footage of the crash itself, a decision he explains around the 11:57 mark.)

 

David joined us today to discuss:

  • His passion for freestyle skiing, and why he at first gave up on his Olympic dreams before going on to become the first (and second) gold medalist in the half-pipe (3:00)
  • The way athletes in his sport aim to prevent serious injuries even as they take seemingly risky leaps through the air (5:32)
  • Why his first words after his recent crash were “that was so dumb” (7:29)
  • What he feels when he watches the video of the accident, and why he keeps doing so (12:00)
  • Why he’s actually glad his children have seen him struggling during his recovery (16:34)
  • Why he believes happiness is an outcome, but joy is a choice (17:52)
  • How he’s gotten through the daily grind of rehab, one day and one small victory at a time (19:44)
  • Why he almost quit the sport, before he began working on the mental side of training and competition (22:23)
  • What playing the banjo and learning French have to do with his recovery process (30:49)
  • Why his biggest advice for other injured athletes revolves around gratitude, as well as what he calls “high hopes and low expectations” (38:38)

 

Resources/links we mention:

 

You can subscribe to The Injured Athletes Club on Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts, and if you like what you hear, please leave us a rating or a review in Apple podcasts. That helps other injured athletes find the show.

 

To access more resources for injured athletes:

  • Join The Injured Athletes Club mailing list, for weekly news and updates
  • Join The Injured Athletes Club Facebook group, for support and camaraderie
  • Email us at [email protected] with questions, guest suggestions, or other feedback

 

DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional because of something you may have heard in an episode of this podcast. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment. Guests who speak on this podcast express their own opinions, experiences, and conclusions, and The Injured Athletes Club podcast hosts nor any company providing financial support endorses or opposes any particular treatment option discussed in the episodes of this podcast and are not responsible for any actions or inactions of listeners based on the information presented. The use of any information provided is solely at your own risk.