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11 | Two-Time Olympic Gold Medalist and Freestyle Skier David Wise: High Hopes and Low Expectations

The Injured Athletes Club

Release Date: 07/11/2019

66 | Carrie Answers a Question: Sarah’s Situation show art 66 | Carrie Answers a Question: Sarah’s Situation

The Injured Athletes Club

“When coming back from injury and having had a number of setbacks, how do you ‘read your body’ to know when to rest more or when to keep up with a PT program? I’m week 4 of 6 in a CAM boot for PTTD. I have a physio, but I’m still scared that—when I can stop wearing the boot—I will not take things slow enough and will reinjure myself. I have lost any confidence that I’ll know when to pull back before getting injured again, and I’m scared of also going out too fast if (IF) I feel better when the boot’s off.”   This week, co-host and mental skills coach Carrie Jackson...

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65 | Golfer Hannah McCook: Practicing Patience show art 65 | Golfer Hannah McCook: Practicing Patience

The Injured Athletes Club

“A surgery doesn't just fix you physically, it also does help you a bit mentally. The injury gives you that time to stop, in a way. It’s not always appreciated at the time, but you look back, and it was actually quite good to have stopped and kind of reset and be like, right, this is what I want to do—because of how much you miss it.”   Her untapped talent at asking for help. The limits of her patience—and how they weren’t as hard and fast as she’d believed. And, the depth of her commitment to her sport. Scottish pro golfer learned a lot about herself in the year it took...

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64 | Carrie Answers a Question: Whitney’s Wonderings show art 64 | Carrie Answers a Question: Whitney’s Wonderings

The Injured Athletes Club

“I am a cyclist and do triathlons every so often for fun. I had to give up running years ago after three ankle surgeries which ended with chronic stress fractures. I’ve always been told because I have cavovarus feet I will need surgery to correct, but I’ve been able to put it off. One of my ankles is currently flared up and doc says I should do the surgery on that foot now. It would mean 4 months off the bike. I really want to keep putting it off, as cycling doesn’t bother it. However, I can no longer even wear running shoes, so any sort of fast walking or hiking is currently out. I...

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63 | Runner and Coach Neely Spence Gracey: Aligning Heart, Mind, and Body show art 63 | Runner and Coach Neely Spence Gracey: Aligning Heart, Mind, and Body

The Injured Athletes Club

“When I first got pregnant, I was like, ‘Oh, it's just like a big injury. You slowly lose fitness, and then you eventually have to stop altogether. And then you take some time off, then you get back to it once you're healed and recovered.’ And I was pretty far off. I feel like it definitely was a different process, because you are physically changing and emotionally changing and mentally changing on top of not being able to run. On the other side of it, I feel like I came out a different person.”   About a year after Neely Spence Gracey’s first son was born, she found herself in...

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62 | Carrie Answers a Question: Jen’s Juxtaposition show art 62 | Carrie Answers a Question: Jen’s Juxtaposition

The Injured Athletes Club

“My question is about how to balance hope with logic. My injuries related to low bone density that was a consequence of an eating disorder in my 30s. I know the reality is I can no longer run as much as I used to because that is what the doctors say (and I trust them) and my hope is that my body will prove them wrong. At some point hope evolves or devolves into delusion. How do I remain engaged in the sport while respecting the reality that my body has limits that I used to thrive off of pushing?”   This week, co-host and mental skills coach Carrie Jackson answers a question from...

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61 | Author and Coach Matt Fitzgerald: The Complexities of Hope show art 61 | Author and Coach Matt Fitzgerald: The Complexities of Hope

The Injured Athletes Club

“I don't want to put my life on pause. Don't get me wrong, I don't want to miss out on the miracle cure when it comes along, so I do pay attention. But I really compartmentalize it. I try not to open that door too wide. I mostly just focus on, let's just assume it's not going to get any better than this. How OK can I be with my present limitations, feeling the way I am?”   At the end of February 2020, prolific author and endurance athlete spectated at the Olympic Marathon Trials, then ran the Publix Atlanta Marathon. Soon afterward, he developed symptoms of the disease that would...

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60 | Carrie Answers a Question: Adrian’s Anger show art 60 | Carrie Answers a Question: Adrian’s Anger

The Injured Athletes Club

"Of all the emotions I have felt after injury, the one I'm having the most trouble dealing with is anger. I'm mad at myself, my coach, and at the medical professionals who I feel have failed me. I know some of this is justified. But I also feel trapped by it. What can I do to move forward?” This week, co-host Carrie Jackson answers a question from Adrian O., taking out her emotional metal detector to help injured athletes see what lies beneath their anger—and how to handle what they uncover.

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59 | Paralympic Medalist and Swimmer Mallory Weggemann: Now Doesn’t Define You show art 59 | Paralympic Medalist and Swimmer Mallory Weggemann: Now Doesn’t Define You

The Injured Athletes Club

Though she’d grown up in the water, Mallory Weggeman was nearly ready to leave competition behind for other dreams. But when a medical procedure gone wrong resulted in her paralysis at age 18, she found herself back in the pool. There, she excelled swiftly enough to win Paralympic gold four years later. She had every intention of extending her athletic career, but in 2014 she had another serious injury. At this second point of impact, she had to decide all over again if swimming was worth the fight.

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58 | Carrie Answers a Question: Aisling’s Obstacle show art 58 | Carrie Answers a Question: Aisling’s Obstacle

The Injured Athletes Club

Aisling C. asks: "Could you discuss how injury shows up the fault-lines in your relationships? Injuries change the dynamics, and certainly my back-to-back injuries have made me feel less in control, less independent, and probably facing the relationship issues I was literally running away from." Carrie offers insight on the dynamics that affect those around the injured athlete, too.

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57 | Carrie and Cindy Build Your Team show art 57 | Carrie and Cindy Build Your Team

The Injured Athletes Club

When you’re an injured athlete, it’s easy to feel isolated and alone. There are a lot of legitimate reasons for this, and factors that make it challenging to reach out and ask for the support you need. In this episode, co-host and mental skills coach Carrie Jackson talks us through exactly why support matters so much. And, she gives you specific tactics for determining which support you need and when you need it, and how to assemble a willing crew around you to offer it.

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More Episodes

When you’re on top of the world after a major victory—say, an Olympic gold medal (or two)—it’s relatively easy to think positively. But David Wise has had his fair share of challenges surrounding his greatest achievements. Through his work on mental skills, though, he’s learned to view each setback as a chance to soar higher. 

 

Most recently, this past May, he took a bad landing during a run in Austria and broke his femur. David allowed the filmmaker who was there to document his flips and spins, Justin Burgan, to focus his lens instead on the unfolding drama of uncertainty and recovery. 

 

Doing so made the transformation of obstacle into opportunity even more resonant for David. Through sharing his story, he found a new voice, speaking to all types of athletes and other individuals coping with challenges of their own. (You can watch the resulting videos here in a series he calls “Overcoming”; don’t worry, he doesn’t include footage of the crash itself, a decision he explains around the 11:57 mark.)

 

David joined us today to discuss:

  • His passion for freestyle skiing, and why he at first gave up on his Olympic dreams before going on to become the first (and second) gold medalist in the half-pipe (3:00)
  • The way athletes in his sport aim to prevent serious injuries even as they take seemingly risky leaps through the air (5:32)
  • Why his first words after his recent crash were “that was so dumb” (7:29)
  • What he feels when he watches the video of the accident, and why he keeps doing so (12:00)
  • Why he’s actually glad his children have seen him struggling during his recovery (16:34)
  • Why he believes happiness is an outcome, but joy is a choice (17:52)
  • How he’s gotten through the daily grind of rehab, one day and one small victory at a time (19:44)
  • Why he almost quit the sport, before he began working on the mental side of training and competition (22:23)
  • What playing the banjo and learning French have to do with his recovery process (30:49)
  • Why his biggest advice for other injured athletes revolves around gratitude, as well as what he calls “high hopes and low expectations” (38:38)

 

Resources/links we mention:

 

You can subscribe to The Injured Athletes Club on Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts, and if you like what you hear, please leave us a rating or a review in Apple podcasts. That helps other injured athletes find the show.

 

To access more resources for injured athletes:

  • Join The Injured Athletes Club mailing list, for weekly news and updates
  • Join The Injured Athletes Club Facebook group, for support and camaraderie
  • Email us at [email protected] with questions, guest suggestions, or other feedback

 

DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional because of something you may have heard in an episode of this podcast. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment. Guests who speak on this podcast express their own opinions, experiences, and conclusions, and The Injured Athletes Club podcast hosts nor any company providing financial support endorses or opposes any particular treatment option discussed in the episodes of this podcast and are not responsible for any actions or inactions of listeners based on the information presented. The use of any information provided is solely at your own risk.