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Norm Peterson Is Gay for Pay

Gayest Episode Ever

Release Date: 09/09/2020

Rachel Kisses a Lesbian show art Rachel Kisses a Lesbian

Gayest Episode Ever

Friends, “The One with Rachel's Big Kiss” (April 26, 2001) — Welcome back Emelie Battaglia for another go-around with America’s favorite homophobic sitcom, Friends! This episode has “Chandler is gay” jokes aplenty, even if he’s about to marry Monica, but the focus is actually on Rachel, who encounters a college acquaintance (Winona Ryder) with whom she once shared a kiss. This episode features two more woman-on-woman kisses than the one where Carol and Susan get married. Ahem.

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Diane Chambers Revisited (An Episode That Glen Can Actually Listen To) show art Diane Chambers Revisited (An Episode That Glen Can Actually Listen To)

Gayest Episode Ever

Cheers, ”The Boys in the Bar“ (January 27, 1983) — If you’ve been listening to this podcast for a bit, you may be aware of the fact that Glen refuses to listen to it. Drew thinks this is too bad, because this really seems like the kind of podcast Glen would really enjoy. In celebration of Glen’s birthday month, Drew asked Sam Pancake and Tony Rodriguez to do a reading of one of the best episodes we’ve done: Episode 10, “Diane Chambers Is an LGBT Ally.”

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Mike Seaver Actually Said the Word ‘Gay’ show art Mike Seaver Actually Said the Word ‘Gay’

Gayest Episode Ever

Growing Pains — “Mike’s Madonna Story” (November 5, 1985) Yep, we’re actually doing Growing Pains — specifically because of one scene in a first-season episode in which Kirk Cameron’s character tosses of the line “Maybe I’m gay.” It might seem small, but it’s crazy to consider the word “gay” even being spoken on this quintessential 80s family show, much less by a character played by a guy who’d shortly thereafter become a born-again Christianity and who’d eventually disclose so

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Norm Peterson Is Gay for Pay show art Norm Peterson Is Gay for Pay

Gayest Episode Ever

“Norm, Is That You?” (December 8, 1988), Cheers — If we told you this episode features George Wendt’s character pretending to be gay, you’d probably imagine that Wendt would go really big with that performance. Most sitcoms would if a straight actor were playing a straight character playing a gay character, but Cheers doesn’t, and in fact this is an episode about gayness where it goes oddly remarked upon. 

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In the House Made RuPaul Play a Heterosexual show art In the House Made RuPaul Play a Heterosexual

Gayest Episode Ever

In the House, “Boys II Men II Women” (December 4, 1995) — Twenty-five ago, long before he’d become a media mogul and the face of an international franchise, Rupaul made 1995 his most mainstream year yet. Not only did he have his mainstream debut in The Brady Bunch movie, but he also did one-off guest roles in a number of network sitcoms. But only In the House had him playing a drag queen who was an avowed heterosexual.

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Introducing the Shelley Longcast! show art Introducing the Shelley Longcast!

Gayest Episode Ever

Episode One: The Brady Bunch Movie — Welcome to the first installment of the Shelley Longcast, the only podcast (that we know of) dedicated to the cinematic work of Shelley Long. You’re seeing this on the Gayest Episode Ever feed because it’s the the Patreon-exclusive bonus series we’ve launched and we decided you listeners might enjoy this first, more TV-related episode: The Brady Bunch Movie.

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Finch’s Buddy Is Trans show art Finch’s Buddy Is Trans

Gayest Episode Ever

Just Shoot Me, “Brandy, You’re a Fine Girl” (November 16, 2000) — Finally, it’s Gayest Episode Ever’s first trans episode. Glen and Drew decided to start with a 2000 episode of Just Shoot Me that features Jenny McCarthy as the childhood friend of David Spade’s character who rolls into town with some surprising news. It’s not great, but this episode’s shortcomings demonstrate how the general conversation about trans folks has evolved in the past twenty years.

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Alice Dates a Homo show art Alice Dates a Homo

Gayest Episode Ever

Alice, “Alice Gets a Pass” (September 29, 1976) — Why on earth was this the second episode of this show? When a former football star-turned-movie actor comes into town, Linda Lavin’s Alice is happy to take him out on a date, but she and everyone else are surprised to learn that he’s gay. Of all the episodes we’ve discussed so far, this one more than others captures a very particular flavor of homophobia: it being masked as maternal concern about predatory men.

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Eric Forman’s New Buddy Is a Homo show art Eric Forman’s New Buddy Is a Homo

Gayest Episode Ever

That 70s Show, “Eric’s Buddy” (December 6, 1998) — In its first season, the show featured Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a student who befriends Topher Grace’s character — and then kisses him. It may not fully stick the landing, but it at least deserves credit for featuring a boy-on-boy kiss in primetime well before Dawson’s Creek did it.

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Trailer 2.0 show art Trailer 2.0

Gayest Episode Ever

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More Episodes

“Norm, Is That You?” (December 8, 1988)

If we told you this episode features George Wendt’s character pretending to be gay, you’d probably imagine that Wendt would go really big with that performance. Most sitcoms would if a straight actor were playing a straight character playing a gay character, but Cheers doesn’t, and in fact this is an episode about gayness where it goes oddly not remarked upon — and not spoken about outright. 

Listen to our previous Cheers episodes, Rebecca Howe Suffers From Gay Blindness and Diane Chambers Is an LGBT Ally.

Here’s the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article in which it was conjectured that Cheers might replace Kirstie Alley with Joan Severance, playing Rebecca Howe’s sister.

Watch the trailer for Norman… Is That You?, the 1973 Redd Foxx comedy that came out three years after his sitcom referenced the source material in “Lamont, Is That You?”

The strangeness that is Pink Lady and Jeff.

And yes, Spain remade Cheers. It has a Woody and a Coach existing at the same time. It’s weird.

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Buy Glen’s movie, Being Frank.

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This episode’s outro track is "Southpaw" by Pink Lady: Apple MusicSpotify