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Homily - A Meandering Mess of Homily on Something or Other

OrthoAnalytika

Release Date: 08/23/2021

Homily - Spiritual Maturity show art Homily - Spiritual Maturity

OrthoAnalytika

Ephesians 2:14-22 (wall of separation), Luke 10:25-37 (eye of the camel).  In this homily (hostage situation?), Fr. Anthony notes how far our experience is from that promised by the Gospel.  He suggests that it is our unwillingness to take our commitment to perfection (I have united myself to Christ!) seriously.  He provides ways to gauge our spiritual maturity (how we respond to praise and criticism; how tightly we hold onto ideas and things that are not necessary) and offers the Orthodox Way as the most efficient way to increase the ability of God's grace to lift us into His...

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Homily - Storehouses, Discipline, and Grace show art Homily - Storehouses, Discipline, and Grace

OrthoAnalytika

Luke 12:16-21; Ephesians 2:4-10.  Alas, I still feel the effects of Covid (mind fog, a cough).  In this homily on overcoming our limitations through discipline and grace, I overshared (twice!), squashed three points, and overshot my landing.  Despite this, I hope you find something useful in there somewhere.  Enjoy the show!

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Homily Recap - The Good Samaritan IS Love show art Homily Recap - The Good Samaritan IS Love

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Hebrews 7:26-8:2; Luke 10:25-37.  In this recap of today's homily (the recorder didn't work for the actual homily, so Fr. Anthony recorded this in the car on his way home), Fr. Anthony takes humanity to task for not loving God or our neighbor.  He also describes God's plan for rectifying this situation.  Enjoy the show!

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Homily - Together on the Cross show art Homily - Together on the Cross

OrthoAnalytika

Fr. Anthony misplaced his recorder, so this homily is about a month old.  He talks about the need to imitate Christ on the Cross - and that means suffering for others NOT for ourselves.  And we should never do that alone.  Enjoy the show.

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Homily - Seeing and Caring for the Broken Among Us show art Homily - Seeing and Caring for the Broken Among Us

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In this homily on the Parable on the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31), Fr. Anthony makes three points: that we are called to notice and care for the hungry and sick at our doorstep, that we are to called to notice and minister to all the suffering people in our midst (which is everyone) and that one of the best things to do is invite people to join us at the Eucharistic Feast.  Enjoy the show! 

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Homily - Holiness, Beauty, and Subtle Changes towards Perfection show art Homily - Holiness, Beauty, and Subtle Changes towards Perfection

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2 Corinthians 6:16-7:1 ; Luke 7:11-16.  After introducing perspective into the conversation about miracles, Fr. Anthony talks about the need for the mature Christian to move beyond using (just) the rules when seeking holiness and instead constantly looking and listening for opportunities for subtle repentance.  Enjoy the show!

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Homily-We are TOGETHER on the Cross show art Homily-We are TOGETHER on the Cross

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In this homily, Fr. Anthony continues to meditate on the meaning of the Cross.  This time, he combines three concepts: the purpose of Christ's passion (to heal and save others, not himself), the fact that we are called to be Christ (with him in us and us in him) and the unity of Christians in and as Christ's body to challenge us to live sacrificially in service to others.  Enjoy the show! 

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Homily - Getting Anthropology and Sociology Wrong show art Homily - Getting Anthropology and Sociology Wrong

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2 Corinthians: 4:6-15 and Luke 5:1-11.  Fr. Anthony offers a meditation on how our culture sets us up for failure with fallen and incomplete anthropologies and ecclesiologies.  The answer is to live Orthodoxy in face-to-face relations (around the table).  Enjoy the show!

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Homily - The Other Cross show art Homily - The Other Cross

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On the Sunday after the Universal Exaltation of the Holy Cross (Galatians 2:16-20; Mark 8:34-38; 9:1) Fr. Anthony explains why the image of the Cross (vs. for example, the sun) is so important for framing the Christian/True approach to salvation and holiness.  After stretching the metaphor of gardening (and yes, he really did swing from poison vines when young), he borrows from Mp. Anthony of Sourozh and Fr. Thomas Hopko to share the three types of suffering and the image of the thief's cross.  Enjoy the show!

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Homily - Christ, Moses, Snakes, Demons, and Salvation show art Homily - Christ, Moses, Snakes, Demons, and Salvation

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In this homily on St. John 3:13-17, Fr. Anthony describes how we are like the Israelites in the wilderness being bitten by serpents for our sins; and how Christ lifted up is still the way to healing, harmony, and salvation.  Enjoy the show!

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More Episodes

1 Corinthians 3:9-17; Matthew 14:22-34.  

Here's the text of the homily I was going to give.  Instead of it, I preached on what "the day" has declared in our lives over the last couple of years.  It was partially prompted by recent events in Afghanistan (I worked the Afghanistan situation for several years as an intelligence analyst).

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Homily – Building a House of God
The Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

1 Corinthians 3: 9-17; St. Matthew 14: 22-34

A building set on a firm foundation, made well and of the best materials is both more durable and more suiting than one thrown together on the weekends with leftover scraps.  Which method describes the temple that is you?

 Three points from today’s Epistle reading, each of them explores what St. Paul means when he says that ; “You are God’s building… his holy temple.”

The First Point: St. Paul is using a metaphor.  He is comparing us to a building in order to teach us something we have not realized about ourselves.  We may think we know more about what it means to be a Christian than we do about being a building, but what if we are wrong?  St. Paul – and all of our other teachers – try to bring us to the truth by stating it plainly; but one of the problems with being human is that we hear such plain speaking in a manner that matches our expectations.  It is rarely transformative in the way we need.  We think we know what it means to be a Christian, so when someone tries to tell us a better way to do it rarely sinks in.  On the other hand, we probably haven’t thought much about how we are like buildings, so the hope is that the metaphor of the building will make it through our defense systems in order to challenge us to live better.  There are many ways in which we are certainly NOT a building, but let’s see how we are, and what that says about living the Christian life.

The Second Point: every building needs a proper foundation.  If this foundation is ourselves (the “contractor’s grade” default option), or even something so noble as our families, our work, our friends, our community, or our, then no matter how well we build that house, it will not last.  The only proper foundation for the house that is each one of us, is Christ Himself.  Our imaginations may have a hard time with this.  Many of us grew up singing a wonderful song; “On Christ the solid rock, I stand; all other ground is sinking sand” – now what is the child’s imagination to do with such an image?!  But this song is based on Christ’s teaching towards the end of His “sermon on the mount” (St. Matthew 5-7), where, after telling everyone to dedicate themselves completely to love and service in God’s name, He says that this kind of life will make them like the wise man who built his house on the rock, and his house survived every buffet; and those who do not are like the fool who built his house on sand, and his house fell with a great crash (St. Matthew 7: 24-27). 

Our foundation must be on Christ; and not the Christ of our imaginations or as we think He is or want Him to be (this is just sand by another name); but on Christ as He really is.  And there is no better way to learn who Christ really is than through opening ourselves completely to the prayer, worship, teachings, and experience of the Orthodox Church.  St. Paul is speaking as an Apostle of this Church when he says; “According to the grace of God which was given to me, as a wise master builder I have laid the foundation.”  We must center our feet squarely on the unmovable source of power, love, and truth; and that source is Our Lord, Jesus Christ.

The Third Point: it matters what sort of materials you use.  St. Paul puts it this way;

“Now if anyone builds on this foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw, each one’s work will become clear; for the Day will declare it, because it will be revealed by fire; and the fire will test each one’s work, of what sort it is.” 

We understand what this means, because we have seen what happens to buildings that were made poorly of cheap materials ; and we can compare them with the buildings that were made well and of the best materials.  The best materials are sometimes harder to get, and it takes more effort to build something to last.  I remember the fort my friends and I built in the woods using left over scraps from our basements and garages.  It was so cool – but it did not last.  I’m sure you’ve had similar experiences.  Think about his: If we knew that we were meant to live somewhere for thousands of years – perhaps even forever, wouldn’t we take the time to build it well?  Or would we throw something up as the mood struck us and hope for the best?  And yet isn’t that the way we act; putting Christian spackle over the walls we threw up willy-nilly based on what are hearts desired in any given moment? 

In the metaphor, the materials are gold, silver, stones, wood, hay, and straw; but in real life, the materials are your actions.  How have we lived?  Have we been chaste?   Self-sacrificing? Charitable?  Patient with others?    Have we followed the counsel of our ego; the wisdom of the age; … or the guidance of Christ and His Church?  

We can pretend that all actions are the same (God loves us!  He can bless the things my heart truly desires!), but St. Paul is pointing out that they are not – there is an objective standard for judging our actions.  A straw house will be blown down by the first hungry wolf that comes to the door; a brick house will stand up to his huffing and puffing.  The spiritual wolves [fire] will destroy the man who has built his life in deceit and selfishness; but cannot harm the one who has built his life in love and repentance.  

So, in conclusion, I ask you: have you built your life on the solid rock that is Christ?  Is it the real Christ, or is it one that simply suits your fancy?  Are you sure? 

Have you intentionally laid the walls of your house brick by brick with humility, love, patience, long-suffering, and charity?  When a bad brick was laid in, have you repented of your misdeed, rooted it out, and repaired the damage?  Have you constantly checked for leaks and performed the maintenance necessary to keep your house secure from the constant abuse of the elements?  

And last of all, have you filled this house with the only thing worthy of such a temple: the Holy Spirit of God Himself?  For as St. Paul ends today’s lesson; “For the temple of God is holy, whose temple you are.”

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