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2 | Ultrarunner/Obstacle Course Racer Amelia Boone: Carving a New Path Post-Injury

The Injured Athletes Club

Release Date: 02/19/2019

12 | Cindy and Carrie Take Stress Head-On show art 12 | Cindy and Carrie Take Stress Head-On

The Injured Athletes Club

Blowing bubbles, cuddling with cats, and drinking tea on your deck might not seem to have tangible effects on your recovery process—but in reality, they can be critical. When left unchecked, stress can quickly become yet another psychological and physical obstacle to recovery, and self care is an important technique for neutralizing it. This week, Carrie talks in more depth about the perils of stress for injured athletes—and shares one concrete tool to begin neutralizing it.

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11 | Two-Time Olympic Gold Medalist and Freestyle Skier David Wise: High Hopes and Low Expectations show art 11 | Two-Time Olympic Gold Medalist and Freestyle Skier David Wise: High Hopes and Low Expectations

The Injured Athletes Club

When you’re on top of the world after a major victory—say, an Olympic gold medal (or two)—it’s relatively easy to think positively. But David Wise has had his fair share of challenges surrounding his greatest achievements. Through his work on mental skills, though, he’s learned to view each setback as a chance to soar higher. Here, he shares the story of his most recent obstacle, a broken femur sustained weeks before in Austria.

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10 | Cindy and Carrie Turn Obstacles into Opportunities show art 10 | Cindy and Carrie Turn Obstacles into Opportunities

The Injured Athletes Club

Even the strongest, most resilient athletes might feel anger or despair in the face of unanticipated setbacks. You can’t always control that reflexive reaction. But it is often possible to pause, take a beat, and change your response. This week , Carrie shares a strategy for shifting your perspective when you hit a snag. Obstacles to Opportunities gives you a step-by-step framework for recognizing counterproductive narratives and nudging them toward those that keep you moving forward.

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9 | High Fives Foundation's Roy Tuscany: Not the Same, But Still Awesome show art 9 | High Fives Foundation's Roy Tuscany: Not the Same, But Still Awesome

The Injured Athletes Club

In the aftermath of a skiing accident that burst-fractured his T12 vertebrae, Roy Tuscany found a critical source of positivity—the support of his family, friends and community, who started a fund that enabled him to focus on healing. As Roy moved through recovery, he decided to repay this kindness by starting an organization that would offer the same gift to other injured athletes. Now, more than 10 years later, the High Fives Foundation has disbursed more than $3 million in grants to 237 athletes.

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8 | Cindy and Carrie Climb the Anxiety Pyramid show art 8 | Cindy and Carrie Climb the Anxiety Pyramid

The Injured Athletes Club

Of all the emotions you’ll encounter in your injury journey, fear and anxiety are among the most powerful. Often, they can tell you something important: that even if your body’s healed, your mind may not be ready for you to return to training and competition. This week, Carrie offers a tool to help get your physical and emotional recovery back in sync. It’s called the anxiety pyramid, and it provides a simple but effective way to visualize going step by step to gain confidence during your comeback.

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7 | Runner and Coach Julie Sapper: Earning a Personal Best in Recovery show art 7 | Runner and Coach Julie Sapper: Earning a Personal Best in Recovery

The Injured Athletes Club

Running coach Julie Sapper, half of the duo behind Maryland-based Run Farther and Faster, has finished the Boston Marathon 10 times. Three and a half weeks before this April’s race, she felt a strange pop in her knee during an easy run. The next morning, she called the orthopedic specialist. MRI results confirmed her suspicions: She’d torn her meniscus. Instead of toeing the starting line in Hopkinton, she scheduled surgery for May 1. Here's how she's approaching rehab and recovery, physically and menta

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6 | Elite Marathoner Kaitlin Goodman: A Return to Running Joyfully show art 6 | Elite Marathoner Kaitlin Goodman: A Return to Running Joyfully

The Injured Athletes Club

In the summer of 2018, pro runner Kaitlin Goodman had just signed a contract with the Boston Athletic Association High Performance Team and Adidas. She was training for the TCS New York City Marathon that fall. Then, on a training run in August, she dove to avoid a car that nearly hit her and partially tore her hamstring tendon. The diagnosis—and the subsequent recovery—ranks as one of the biggest challenges she’s faced. In her journey back to running, she gained perspective (and a new family member).

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5 | Cindy and Carrie Share Bad News and Good News show art 5 | Cindy and Carrie Share Bad News and Good News

The Injured Athletes Club

It’s the week before the Boston Marathon, and I—Cindy Kuzma—won’t be running it, for the first time in six years. I’m disappointed but also excited to watch an amazing elite field and cheer on my friends. Sitting with those conflicting emotions has proven challenging. So I’m glad that this week on The Injured Athletes Club, my co-host and mental skills coach Carrie Jackson Cheadle talks me through an exercise that’s all about making peace with feelings that seem opposite. We call it Bad News,

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4 | CrossFit Athlete Miranda Alcaraz: New Ways to Move show art 4 | CrossFit Athlete Miranda Alcaraz: New Ways to Move

The Injured Athletes Club

Miranda Alcaraz—a former high-level CrossFit competitor and now co-founder of thriving fitness community Street Parking—has experience with injuries both in and out of her sport, including a serious car accident and a torn ACL that happened in the middle of a competition. Each has had a different emotional impact, though she used some of the same tools and techniques to approach her recovery—strategies she shares with other injured athletes who reach out to her, and in this episode.

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3 | How to Go FAR: Feel, Accept, Recover show art 3 | How to Go FAR: Feel, Accept, Recover

The Injured Athletes Club

Mental skills coach Carrie Jackson Cheadle and journalist Cindy Kuzma, your co-hosts, are here to talk you through a mental exercise Carrie recommends to work your way through sticky situations during your recovery. This one’s called: Go FAR. It stands for Feel, Accept, Recover, and you can use it anytime you feel trapped or are facing a bump in the road you just can’t see your way through.

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Amelia Boone is an ultrarunner, four-time world champion obstacle course racer, and full-time attorney. She was dominating the OCR scene and training for the Western States Endurance Run—a 100-mile race she describes as “the superbowl of ultramarathons—when she developed a stress fracture in her femur.

That was challenging enough, but not long after recovering from that injury, Amelia had a second setback—a sacral stress fracture. In the end, she was sidelined from running for nearly a year, and didn’t race for 18 months.

Amelia joined us today to discuss:

-How she’s come to view her injuries as useful experiences and how they changed her relationship with running

-The stages of grief she went through when she learned about her initial fracture, including denial, anger, and finally, acceptance

-The loss of identity that occurred when she couldn’t run, and how she coped

-Why writing has been so important to her throughout the recovery process

-How she overcame some internal resistance and began actively volunteering and participating in the community while injured: “staying involved in the sport and seeing other people's’ joy and learning to hold that as my own”

-Her resistance to the phrase “comeback,” and why she thinks it’s important not to try to recreate the past

-What it felt like to have a second serious diagnosis so soon after her return to running

-The shame and “self-flagellation” that go along with overuse injuries, and how vulnerability has powered her through those difficult emotions

-Why being upset about injury is really just a sign of how dedicated an athlete you are and how much you love your sport

-The top pieces of advice she gives injured athletes, including giving yourself time to grieve, knowing when cross-training is detrimental instead of helpful, and being your own advocate with doctors and other health care providers

 

Resources/links we mention:

-Amelia’s blog

=Her social media pages: Instagram and Twitter


Thanks for listening, and please reach out anytime at hello@injuredathletesclub.com with questions, guest suggestions, or other feedback.

DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional because of something you may have heard in an episode of this podcast. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment. Guests who speak on this podcast express their own opinions, experiences, and conclusions, and The Injured Athletes Club podcast hosts nor any company providing financial support endorses or opposes any particular treatment option discussed in the episodes of this podcast and are not responsible for any actions or inactions of listeners based on the information presented. The use of any information provided is solely at your own risk.