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2 | Ultrarunner/Obstacle Course Racer Amelia Boone: Carving a New Path Post-Injury

The Injured Athletes Club

Release Date: 02/19/2019

10 | Runner and Writer Jen A. Miller on Trusting Yourself show art 10 | Runner and Writer Jen A. Miller on Trusting Yourself

The Injured Athletes Club

Jen A. Miller has been writing about running for The New York Times since 2010. Last year, she sustained a serious setback, a stress fracture in her tibia. In the weekly running newsletter she now writes for the Times, she chronicled her journey, from the anger and frustration at her diagnosis to an emotional comeback, running the New York City Marathon with her mother. On this episode, Jen—the author of the memoir Running: A Love Story—shares her experiences.

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9 | Olympic Pitcher Joey Wagman: Riding the Recovery Roller Coaster show art 9 | Olympic Pitcher Joey Wagman: Riding the Recovery Roller Coaster

The Injured Athletes Club

If you ask Joey Wagman to describe his baseball career, he’ll tell you it’s a bit unorthodox. He’s played in both the minor leagues and several different independent leagues. Since 2017, he’s also pitched for Team Israel, which is now headed to the 2020 Olympics. On this episode, he explains that the high he’s riding was made all the more meaningful due to the lows from which he’d recently emerged—a shoulder injury that required surgery and affected his mental health in ways that caught him o

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8 | Paralympic Medalist Amanda McGrory: The Benefit of Perspective show art 8 | Paralympic Medalist Amanda McGrory: The Benefit of Perspective

The Injured Athletes Club

During her long career as a wheelchair racer, Amanda McGrory has accumulated seven Paralympic medals and more marathon finishes than she can count—including first-place and podium finishes at many of the sport’s major races. Her half-decade’s worth of experience has also brought her something less tangible but incredibly useful: an ability to see the bigger, broader picture of her career and life. This week, she joins us to discuss how that perspective in managing injury.

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7 | Cindy and Carrie Redefine Success show art 7 | Cindy and Carrie Redefine Success

The Injured Athletes Club

One of the biggest challenges of injury is seeing your goals and timelines slip through your fingers. You may know, objectively, that these plans no longer make sense given your new situation. Still, each time you realize you’re not reaching them can provoke feelings of failure. This week, Carrie talks through an exercise designed to call attention to your achievements. Using Redefine Success, you can learn to truly celebrate your wins and fuel yourself with confidence and motivation.

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6 | Triathlete Fiona Ford: Pursue Your Potential show art 6 | Triathlete Fiona Ford: Pursue Your Potential

The Injured Athletes Club

After three years of racing Ironman triathlons as a pro, British triathlete Fiona Ford was having the season of her life. Everything changed in an instant during a training ride on June 23, 2012, when a car pulled out suddenly in front of her, causing her to fly off her bike and hit the pavement. It was a long road back from the hospital room, where doctors told Fiona she’d likely never run a marathon again, to a podium finish in Kona in 2016. In this episode, she explains how she got there.

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5 | International Yoga Instructor Adam Whiting: Moving with Integrity show art 5 | International Yoga Instructor Adam Whiting: Moving with Integrity

The Injured Athletes Club

You might think of yoga as primarily a way to prevent and perhaps recover from other sports injuries. However, it can also be an intense physical endeavor in its own right—one which, instructor Adam Whiting told us on this week’s episode, is going through a transformation in terms of how its practitioners teach and practice. Here, he explains how his own back injury informed his approach, and how it changed his life on and off the mat.

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The Injured Athletes Club

From a torn meniscus weeks before his Pro Day to a broken hand shortly before we recorded this podcast, Brandon Copeland—a linebacker for the New York Jets—has had his share of injury-related setbacks. Now, he maintains a detailed—but flexible—routine to stay healthy, mentally and physically. He joins us on the Injured Athletes Club podcast this week to expand on his regimen and update us on what he’s been up to since we talked for our book, Rebound.

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3 | Olympic Runner Carrie Tollefson: The Power of Positivity show art 3 | Olympic Runner Carrie Tollefson: The Power of Positivity

The Injured Athletes Club

Anyone who’s met Carrie Tollefson, seen her on national broadcasts, or listened to her podcast C Tolle Run would likely describe her as a positive person. But her athletic career wasn't all high moments. Along the way, she had a number of serious setbacks, including a cancer scare, years of plantar fasciitis, and a painful abdominal injury. She came back from these injuries to secure a total of five NCAA championships, a spot on the Olympic team, and a long-term career covering the sport.

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2 | Cindy and Carrie Explain How to Rebound show art 2 | Cindy and Carrie Explain How to Rebound

The Injured Athletes Club

Injuries affect essentially every athlete. The experience is as much mental as physical. But typically, the support athletes receive during this time has focused mostly on joints, bones, and tendons—not thoughts, emotions, and experiences. This podcast and our Facebook group for injured athletes are intended to help change that. Now, we have a new resource to share: our book Rebound: Train Your Mind to Bounce Back Stronger from Sports Injuries, out Oct. 15 from Bloomsbury Sport.

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1 | Olympic Gold Medalist and Hockey Forward Meghan Duggan show art 1 | Olympic Gold Medalist and Hockey Forward Meghan Duggan

The Injured Athletes Club

In December of 2011, hockey forward Meghan Duggan sustained a serious concussion that required 14 months of recovery. At her lowest, she wondered if she could handle going to the grocery store, let alone returning to the ice. But through a long, slow process of self-discovery and an innovative treatment, she rebounded—to new heights. While her injury recovery was terrible, she said, the skills and determination she gained fueled all that came afterward, including Olympic gold.

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More Episodes

Amelia Boone is an ultrarunner, four-time world champion obstacle course racer, and full-time attorney. She was dominating the OCR scene and training for the Western States Endurance Run—a 100-mile race she describes as “the superbowl of ultramarathons—when she developed a stress fracture in her femur.

That was challenging enough, but not long after recovering from that injury, Amelia had a second setback—a sacral stress fracture. In the end, she was sidelined from running for nearly a year, and didn’t race for 18 months.

Amelia joined us today to discuss:

-How she’s come to view her injuries as useful experiences and how they changed her relationship with running

-The stages of grief she went through when she learned about her initial fracture, including denial, anger, and finally, acceptance

-The loss of identity that occurred when she couldn’t run, and how she coped

-Why writing has been so important to her throughout the recovery process

-How she overcame some internal resistance and began actively volunteering and participating in the community while injured: “staying involved in the sport and seeing other people's’ joy and learning to hold that as my own”

-Her resistance to the phrase “comeback,” and why she thinks it’s important not to try to recreate the past

-What it felt like to have a second serious diagnosis so soon after her return to running

-The shame and “self-flagellation” that go along with overuse injuries, and how vulnerability has powered her through those difficult emotions

-Why being upset about injury is really just a sign of how dedicated an athlete you are and how much you love your sport

-The top pieces of advice she gives injured athletes, including giving yourself time to grieve, knowing when cross-training is detrimental instead of helpful, and being your own advocate with doctors and other health care providers

 

Resources/links we mention:

-Amelia’s blog

=Her social media pages: Instagram and Twitter


Thanks for listening, and please reach out anytime at hello@injuredathletesclub.com with questions, guest suggestions, or other feedback.

DISCLAIMER: This content is for educational & informational use only and & does not constitute medical advice. Do not disregard, avoid or delay obtaining medical or health related advice from your health-care professional because of something you may have heard in an episode of this podcast. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult with a qualified medical professional for proper evaluation & treatment. Guests who speak on this podcast express their own opinions, experiences, and conclusions, and The Injured Athletes Club podcast hosts nor any company providing financial support endorses or opposes any particular treatment option discussed in the episodes of this podcast and are not responsible for any actions or inactions of listeners based on the information presented. The use of any information provided is solely at your own risk.