loader from loading.io

Weekly Space Hangout: The Geology of Exoplanets with Dr. Paul Byrne

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Release Date: 09/30/2022

Astronomy Cast Ep. 660: Runaway! Runaway! Escaping Stars, Planets & Small Bodies show art Astronomy Cast Ep. 660: Runaway! Runaway! Escaping Stars, Planets & Small Bodies

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Part 1: Part 2: Part 3:   Moons orbit planets, planets orbit stars, stars orbit within galaxies. It’s orbits all the way down. But occasionally objects can receive a powerful kick that sends them on a journey, never to return.   This video was made possible by the following Patreon members: Burry Gowen Jordan Young Kevin Lyle Jeanette Wink Stephen Veit J.F. Rajotte Andrew Poelstra Venkatesh Chary David Truog TheGiantNothing Aurora Lipper David Gerhard Schwarzer Will Hamilton Brian Cagle   THANK YOU! - Fraser and Dr. Pamela   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days...

info_outline
Travelers in the Night Eps. 205E & 206E: How Close? & Still Out There show art Travelers in the Night Eps. 205E & 206E: How Close? & Still Out There

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. Today's 2 topics: - Dr. Grower discovered 250 foot diameter 2015 YV1. - Carson Fuls has discovered 480 foot diameter 2015 YY9.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you!...

info_outline
The Cosmic Savannah Ep. 38: Rise of the Machine show art The Cosmic Savannah Ep. 38: Rise of the Machine

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Hosted by Dr. Jacinta Delhaize & Dr. Daniel Cunnama. We are joined by Dr. Michelle Lochner who is a senior lecturer at the University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa.   Michelle is developing new machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) tools to analyze the massive astronomical datasets of next- generation telescopes. Michelle talks to us about her work on detecting and classifying galaxies and transient events. She has also developed a code to spot weird astronomical anomalies – the so-called “unknown unknowns!”   She is preparing for the vast data...

info_outline
Weekly Space Hangout: Untying an Early Weekly Space Hangout: Untying an Early "Cosmic Knot" with Dr. Andrey Vayner

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Streamed live on Nov 9, 2022. Host: Fraser Cain ( ) Special Guest: Since its final commissioning and being placed in service, JWST has been delivering on its promise to provide unprecedented insight into the most distant — and oldest — regions of our Universe. Whether it's providing a new view of our nearby neighbor Jupiter, or sussing out never-before-seen details of the iconic Eagle Nebula and its Pillars of Creation, let's face it - the imagery so far has been nothing less than stunning! But more importantly, the data being collected by JWST's onboard instrumentation are allowing...

info_outline
Awesome Astronomy - How Big is the Universe? show art Awesome Astronomy - How Big is the Universe?

The 365 Days of Astronomy

From Nov 24, 2021. Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer “Dr. Dust” Millard host.  Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. A simple explanation of the size of the universe, how the universe grew so big and how big it will get.    We give a quick 10 second answer and a longer, more in depth, answer if you want to know more about the universe, how the universe began and how the universe will end. We cover the Big Bang, the Big Freeze, the Big Crunch, how all the atoms, elements and laws of nature came into being - not bad for under 7 minutes!   And...

info_outline
The Daily Space - Water Worlds May Hide Water Underground Summary show art The Daily Space - Water Worlds May Hide Water Underground Summary

The 365 Days of Astronomy

From September 9, 2022. A population study of 43 exoplanets orbiting M-dwarf stars used both the transit method and radial velocity method to find the densities of the worlds and a surprising pattern emerged. The planets are less dense than expected, suggesting they are not purely rock but half-rock and maybe half-water. Plus, star factories in the Milky Way, glaciers on ancient Mars, and This Week in Space History. We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with...

info_outline
Leiden Observatory - Cosmic Perspectives Part 4 show art Leiden Observatory - Cosmic Perspectives Part 4

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Cosmic Perspectives: Dutch Astronomy in Wider Society is a feature podcast that explores the beneficial impact of Dutch astronomy on society, from building positive international relationships to the transfer of life-changing technology.  In this episode we talk about technology & education’s direct impacts of astronomy to the world. You’ve heard of WiFi, haven’t you? Oh yeah. Sorry… Join our host, science communicator Callum Griffiths, as he delves behind the scenes of some of the biggest astronomical endeavors in recent decades with those involved to uncover new...

info_outline
Astronomy Cast Ep. 119: Robots In Space show art Astronomy Cast Ep. 119: Robots In Space

The 365 Days of Astronomy

From December 15, 2008. Space is totally inhospitable. If the freezing temperatures don’t get you, the intense radiation will kill you. Or the vacuum, or the lack of breathable atmosphere, or meteoroid impacts. Well… you get the idea. That’s why most space exploration is done by hardy robots. They don’t need to eat, drink or breathe. They get their energy from the Sun, and they’ve proven they’ve got the right stuff to explore every planet and major moon in the Solar System. Let’s hear it for the space robots.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to...

info_outline
Travelers in the Night Eps. 203E & 204E: Blinky & Blinky Revealed show art Travelers in the Night Eps. 203E & 204E: Blinky & Blinky Revealed

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. Today's 2 topics: - Eric Christiensen discovered 2015 YJ, that had missed the Earth by 40,000 miles. - Dr. Bill Ryan determined that 2015 YJ is a collision fragment perhaps one and a half times longer that it is wide and is spinning on its axis once every 9 minutes.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: and donate as much as you...

info_outline
Deep Astronomy Space Junk Podcast 75 - Stellina & eVscope: Are They Worth the Money? show art Deep Astronomy Space Junk Podcast 75 - Stellina & eVscope: Are They Worth the Money?

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Streamed live on Oct 30, 2020. There is a lot of interest in a new class of telescopes available for amateur astronomers.  These telescopes offer extreme ease-of-use while delivering advanced capability to those just entering the hobby of amateur astronomy. In this episode, Dustin Gibson, CEO of OPT Telescopes and Tony Darnell discuss the value of these scopes and the promise they hold for newcomers to the hobby. Follow Dustin on Instagram: @GibsonPics   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: and...

info_outline
 
More Episodes

https://youtu.be/VjMYAkUq98I

[I apologize for the audio trouble with the podcast. 

The audio demons were busy! - Rich]

Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )
Special Guest: The first suspected exoplanet was identified back in 1988, and was then confirmed in 1992. Since then, the rate at which detection/confirmations have been made has been increasing. And JWST has already directly imaged its first exoplanet! What data are we able to gather from here on Earth? What are we able to learn about these planets from the data collected? How does exoplanet geology compare with our own geology here on Earth? Let's find out as we welcome planetary geologist Dr. Paul Byrne ( @ThePlanetaryGuy / https://eps.wustl.edu/people/paul-byrne ) to the WSH. 

 

Paul Byrne received his B.A. in geology, and Ph.D. in planetary geology, from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. He was a MESSENGER postdoctoral fellow at the Earth and Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, DC, and an LPI postdoctoral fellow at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas. He is an Associate Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis; before coming to WashU, he was an assistant and then associate professor at North Carolina State University.

 

Paul's research focuses on comparative planetary geology—comparing and contrasting the surfaces and interiors of planetary bodies, including Earth, to understand geological phenomena at the systems level. Byrne’s research projects span the solar system from Mercury to Pluto and, increasingly, to the study of extrasolar planets. He uses remotely sensed data, numerical and physical models, and fieldwork in analogue settings on Earth to understand why planets look the way they do.

Regular Guests:

Dr. Leah Jenks ( https://leahjenks.com/ / @leahgjenks )

Beth Johnson - SETI Institute ( @SETIInstitute & @planetarypan )

Dave Dickinson ( http://astroguyz.com/ & @Astroguyz )

This week's stories:

- Stars stealing planets!

- A new satellite annoyance?

- James Webb overturning the Big Bang??

- Water worlds!

- The hazards of uncontrolled reentry.

- The laws of outer space.

 

We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. 

Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can!

Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! 

Every bit helps! Thank you!

------------------------------------

Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness!

http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. 

Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!)

------------------------------------

The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu

Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at [email protected].