loader from loading.io

Astronomy Cast Ep. 708: What Goes Into Sample Return Missions From Asteroids & Comets?

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Release Date: 02/19/2024

Awesome Astronomy - Why Is The Moon Upside Down? show art Awesome Astronomy - Why Is The Moon Upside Down?

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Paul Hill, Ralph Wilkins and Dr. Jenifer “Dr. Dust” Millard host.  Damien Phillips, John Wildridge and Dustin Ruoff produce. But really it’s all just a big Ralph Fest today! From  Mar 25, 2022. If you’ve never been to the southern hemisphere (or the northern hemisphere, if you live in the southern hemisphere), you might not be aware that the moon and the constellations appear upside down!   In this episode we’ll show you how that appears, why, and how that proves the Earth isn’t flat - as if any more proof were needed!   We've added a new way to donate to 365...

info_outline
SETI Live - SETI Artist In Residence Program: Xin Liu’s Inward Expeditions show art SETI Live - SETI Artist In Residence Program: Xin Liu’s Inward Expeditions

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Nimbly combining the tools of art and science, SETI Institute Artist in Residence Xin Liu expresses what it means to be human through a diverse body of work that includes frost-coated sculptures, a bubbling fountain of crude oil, and a performance in outer space.    In a new body of sculptures exhibited at Pioneer Works in New York City, the artist considers her fears around having her eggs frozen, creating warped, skeletal, frost-covered sculptures that propose a human body transformed through a cryogenic process. Through art, Liu centers the human experience in the face of...

info_outline
Exoplanet Radio - Ep 16: How Long To Travel to The Closest Exoplanet Proxima Centauri b? show art Exoplanet Radio - Ep 16: How Long To Travel to The Closest Exoplanet Proxima Centauri b?

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Many people feel that it’s very important for humanity’s long term survival that we become a multiplanet species.  Traveling to and possibly even inhabiting other planets in our solar system is not only possible with our current levels of technology, but compared to going to the stars, it’s downright easy.   But what about traveling to exoplanets?  Can we reach the stars?   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and...

info_outline
Astronomy Cast Ep. 716 - The God**** Particle - Remembering Peter Higgs show art Astronomy Cast Ep. 716 - The God**** Particle - Remembering Peter Higgs

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Streamed live on Apr 15, 2024. Last week, we learned about the death of Peter Higgs, a physicist and discoverer of the particle that bears his name. The Large Hadron Collider was built to find and describe the particle. Today, we’ll look back at the life of Peter Higgs and his particle.   This video was made possible by the following Patreon members: Jordan Young BogieNet Stephen Veit Jeanette Wink Siggi Kemmler Andrew Poelstra Brian Cagle David Truog Ed David Gerhard Schwarzer THANK YOU! - Fraser and Dr. Pamela   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support...

info_outline
Travelers in the Night Eps. 271 & 272: Dark Trails & Mars Impactor show art Travelers in the Night Eps. 271 & 272: Dark Trails & Mars Impactor

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Dr. Al Grauer hosts. Dr. Albert D. Grauer ( ) is an observational asteroid hunting astronomer. Dr. Grauer retired from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2006. Today's 2 topics: - A faint shooting star or meteor streaking across the sky is produced when a tiny bit of rock or dust enters the Earth's atmosphere and burns up some 60 miles above us. NASA scientist Dr. Marc Fries and his collaborators have used Doppler Weather Radar to track twenty meteor's dark trails through the sky. In the past year or so they have used this technique to direct searchers on the ground to the probable...

info_outline
Deep Astronomy - DwarfLab Dwarf 2 Smart Telescope show art Deep Astronomy - DwarfLab Dwarf 2 Smart Telescope

The 365 Days of Astronomy

The Beginner's Gateway to the Cosmos, Even in the City! From  Sep 28, 2023. Here is the Deep Astronomy Review of the Dwarf II smart telescope from Dwarflabs. If you're looking to buy one, here's my affiliate link:   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee...

info_outline
EVSN - Following the Water Toward Climate Change show art EVSN - Following the Water Toward Climate Change

The 365 Days of Astronomy

From April 10, 2024. This week’s episode is brought to you by last week’s terrible weather. While experiencing hail and thunder IRL, we also saw press release after press release and article after article discussing climate change. This one-two punch of new science and the need for a new roof means we will touch on climate change in our closer look this week. We apologize in advance; it’s not pretty out there -- unless you like storm chasing, then it’s kind of the stuff of dreams at the moment.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting,...

info_outline
Actual Astronomy - Globular Star Clusters with Peter Jedicke show art Actual Astronomy - Globular Star Clusters with Peter Jedicke

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Hosted by Chris Beckett & Shane Ludtke, two amateur astronomers in Saskatchewan. Our guest today is Peter Jedicke who was National President of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada from 2004 to 2006 and is now a Fellow of the RASC. He is also Honorary President of the RASC London Centre. His favourite astronomical topic, both astrophysically and as an observer, is globular clusters and co-authored the RASCC Observer’s Handbook section on Star Clusters. Peter co-authors the Star Clusters section of the RASC Observer's Handbook. Lastly, Peter helped start the list of asteroid names...

info_outline
SETI Live - On the Trail of Fireballs: Tracking Meteors and Finding Meteorites show art SETI Live - On the Trail of Fireballs: Tracking Meteors and Finding Meteorites

The 365 Days of Astronomy

Only eight times in history have scientists found an asteroid, tracked its trajectory toward Earth, and caught the resulting fireball on cameras. The latest of these eight events happened in January 2024, with the discovery of asteroid 2024 BX1, a mere three hours before impacting the atmosphere over Europe. And of course, the SETI Institute's own Dr. Peter Jenniskens was hot on the trail, flying to Germany to help search for meteorite fragments. Within the week, several pieces were discovered, and early analysis found that they belong to a rare group of meteorites called "aubrites".  ...

info_outline
Ask A Spaceman Ep. 222: What is the Most Distant Thing We Can See? show art Ask A Spaceman Ep. 222: What is the Most Distant Thing We Can See?

The 365 Days of Astronomy

What’s the most distant thing we can see with the naked eye? What about with a telescope? What about at other wavelengths? Is there anything more to see? I discuss these questions and more in today’s Ask a Spaceman!   This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at betterhelp.com/spaceman and get on your way to being your best self. Visit BetterHelp to get 10% off your first month!   Support the show: All episodes: Follow on Twitter: Read a book:   Keep those questions about space, science, astronomy, astrophysics, physics, and cosmology coming to...

info_outline
 
More Episodes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cDRgJuuSec

Streamed live Feb 12, 2024.

Last week we talked about sample return missions from the Moon and Mars, but scientists have retrieved samples from other objects in the Solar System, including comets and asteroids. What does it take to return a piece of rock from space, and what have we learned so far?

 

This video was made possible by the following Patreon members:

Jordan Young

BogieNet

Stephen Veit ( rhymes with right)

Jeanette Wink

Siggi Kemmler

Andrew Poelstra

Brian Cagle

David Truog

Ed

David

Gerhard Schwarzer

THANK YOU! - Fraser and Dr. Pamela

 

We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs. 

Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can!

Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too! 

Every bit helps! Thank you!

------------------------------------

Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness!

http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations. 

Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!)

------------------------------------

The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu

Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at [email protected].