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Ep. 55 | Ubiquitous Energy’s Susan Stone Intends to Power Our Cities with Invisible Solar Panels

Business for Good Podcast

Release Date: 12/15/2020

Ep. 81 | The Rapid Rise, High-Profile Fall, and Resilient Recovery of Juicero’s Doug Evans show art Ep. 81 | The Rapid Rise, High-Profile Fall, and Resilient Recovery of Juicero’s Doug Evans

Business for Good Podcast

This is a story about how one man entered startup life, rose to great prominence, got battered in the press and endured a very public downfall, and then got back up again and kept pushing his life’s mission to improve public health forward.

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Ep. 80 | Is What You Believe About Food Sustainability Wrong? Robert Paarlberg Thinks So. show art Ep. 80 | Is What You Believe About Food Sustainability Wrong? Robert Paarlberg Thinks So.

Business for Good Podcast

When it comes to food, we often hear that switching to organic, local, non-GMO production methods are what’s best for the planet. But, what if the preponderance of scientific evidence doesn’t support such claims, and that actually both the planet and public health are better off with the synthetic fertilizer banned by organic standards; that buying local may not be better for the planet; and that it’s perfectly safe to eat genetically modified plants?

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Ep. 79 | From Sophomore to CEO: Jessica Schwabach of Sundial Foods is Flying on Plant-Based Wings show art Ep. 79 | From Sophomore to CEO: Jessica Schwabach of Sundial Foods is Flying on Plant-Based Wings

Business for Good Podcast

For real: What were you doing during your sophomore year of college? Probably not what Jessica Schwabach was doing, which was starting her own plant-based meat company. Two years later, Jessica has gone through two prestigious accelerator programs, created products that have been sold in dozens of stores, and just raised a $4 million seed round, including investment from food giant Nestle.

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Ep. 78 | A Conversation with NYC’s Mayor-Elect Eric Adams show art Ep. 78 | A Conversation with NYC’s Mayor-Elect Eric Adams

Business for Good Podcast

A year and a half ago, a guy few people had ever heard of came on to this show’s 44th episode to talk both about the business of police reform as well as his new book advocating plant-based eating. At that time, he was also rumored to be considering running for NYC's highest office. Well, spoiler alert: he won the mayoral race! So we're re-running our conversation with Eric Adams now that he's poised to take the reins of power in America's largest city.

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Ep. 77 | Creating a Cultivated Meat Community: Anita Broellechs and Alex Shirazi show art Ep. 77 | Creating a Cultivated Meat Community: Anita Broellechs and Alex Shirazi

Business for Good Podcast

This is a story of two people who despite not having experience in the cultivated meat space felt so strongly about building a community around it that they started their own podcast, called Cultured Meat and Future Foods, their own conference, the Cultured Meat Symposium, and are now working on a children’s book about cultivated meat together as well.

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Ep 76 | Is Your Cat Ready to Eat Cultivated Mouse Meat? Shannon Falconer and Because Animals Think So show art Ep 76 | Is Your Cat Ready to Eat Cultivated Mouse Meat? Shannon Falconer and Because Animals Think So

Business for Good Podcast

There’s already plant-based pet food, but what about growing actual animal meat for all of our carnivorous best friends? The company featured in this episode, Because Animals, is trying to do just that. And they’re starting with cultivated mouse meat for your cat.

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Ep 75 | The Sweet Side of Starting a (Dairy-Free) Ice Cream Company: Aylon Steinhart & Eclipse Foods show art Ep 75 | The Sweet Side of Starting a (Dairy-Free) Ice Cream Company: Aylon Steinhart & Eclipse Foods

Business for Good Podcast

In 2019, two friends were both working in the alt-protein sector, one at the Good Food Institute and the other at Eat Just. Even though Aylon Steinhart and Thomas Bowman were both doing great things to advance the animal-free protein movement, they wondered if they should try their own hands at co-founding a food tech start-up that would put cows out to pasture and mimic dairy with plants. After serious deliberation, they both left their secure jobs to team up and found Eclipse Foods.

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Ep 74 | A Financial Journalist’s Prescription for Making the Economy Work for Animals show art Ep 74 | A Financial Journalist’s Prescription for Making the Economy Work for Animals

Business for Good Podcast

In his new book, How to Love Animals in a Human-Shaped World, Henry takes his readers on a wild ride through our relationship with animals, including getting a job working at a slaughterhouse himself. Henry repeatedly weaves personal experiences like this one into his narrative, while also making prescriptions for a bold reshaping of the parts of our economy that currently involve animal exploitation.

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Ep 73 |From Dust to Dust...or to Soil: Katrina Spade and the Recompose Vision for an Eco-Friendlier Death Industry show art Ep 73 |From Dust to Dust...or to Soil: Katrina Spade and the Recompose Vision for an Eco-Friendlier Death Industry

Business for Good Podcast

Katrina Spade is on a mission to offer a better way to deal with human corpses, and it involves a process called natural organic reduction. It’s essentially a fancy way of saying she’s invented a method of accelerated composting for your body.

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Ep 72 | Plastic that Won’t Last Forever: Kristin Taylor and the Radical Plastics Story show art Ep 72 | Plastic that Won’t Last Forever: Kristin Taylor and the Radical Plastics Story

Business for Good Podcast

Sure, diamonds—including lab-grown—may be forever. But does plastic also have to be? Not so, according to Kristin Taylor, CEO of Radical Plastics.

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More Episodes

We may hear a lot about solar power and renewable energy, but sadly, our civilization is still voraciously addicted to fossil fuels. Even in a technologically advanced country like America, nearly all — about 90 percent — of the energy we use still comes from non-renewable sources. This not only causes serious environmental damage to extract from the earth, but also is a leading cause of climate change that’s driving countless species to extinction, including possibly own our species if we don’t get our act together.

The effort to collect energy from the sun’s rays has come a long way, but it’s still largely dependent on finding roofspace or large tracts of land to put unappealing blue-grey solar panels. But what if we could collect solar energy through crystal clear film that we could affix to virtually any surface, including the windows of skyscrapers?

By making it possible to invisibly turn outdoor objects like windows into solar energy-collecting devices, we could transform the ways our cities and homes get their power.

That’s exactly what Ubiquitous Energy is seeking to do. The start-up has raised $30 million to commercialize technology that began in an MIT lab that uses invisible film placed on windows to harvest solar energy. And we’ve got their CEO, Susan Stone, on this episode to tell us all about it. 

It doesn’t look like humanity’s energy needs are going to subside any time soon. If anything, we’re going to need more power, not less. And that’s why innovations like Ubiquitous Energy’s are so important: since they allow us to have our energy and eat it too, or maybe have our energy, and heat our homes, too. 

Discussed in this episode

More About Susan Stone

Susan Stone is CEO at Ubiquitous Energy. She has been a longtime board member and investor in the company. Prior to joining Ubiquitous, she was the founder and CEO of Sierra Wasatch Capital, an early stage venture capital firm, and managed early stage investing for Riverhorse Investments, Inc. Susan has also worked at JPMorgan in New York and Houlihan Lokey in Los Angeles as an investment banker focused on mergers & acquisitions. Stone holds an MBA from Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and a bachelor’s degree from Yale University.