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Class - On Silence

OrthoAnalytika

Release Date: 11/02/2019

Homily - Freedom and the Empowerment of the Saints show art Homily - Freedom and the Empowerment of the Saints

OrthoAnalytika

In this homily on the Sunday after Theophany (Ephesians 4:7-13; St. Matthew 4:12-17), Fr. Anthony talks about the gains made in the spreading of wealth (and the dramatic reduction of poverty) brought about through economic freedom, a freedom that encourages and empowers people to identify needs and contribute to the good of all; and uses that as a metaphor for understanding the St. Paul's call to all to find and exercise their gifts toward the building up of the Kingdom.  Enjoy the show!

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Class - The Way of Ascetics 01 show art Class - The Way of Ascetics 01

OrthoAnalytika

Tito Coliander's Way of Ascetics.  It's awesome.  We're going to work our way through it together.  Today's class was interrupted by a tornado warning.  We're all okay, but the recorder shut off (I guess it got scared?)!

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Homily - Learning Charity from our Ancestors show art Homily - Learning Charity from our Ancestors

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The Sunday before the Nativity is for remembering and celebrating the lives of the "ancestors of God."  In this homily, Fr. Anthony encourages us to learn charity towards our neighbors based on the way Scripture (and thus the Holy Spirit) interprets the lives of the heroes of the Old Testament.

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Homily - What Would We Sacrifice for our Sin show art Homily - What Would We Sacrifice for our Sin

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On the Sunday after Nativity we commemorate the slaughter of the innocents by Herod.  Fr. Anthony challenges us to think - and repent of - the sacrifices we would be willing to sacrifice for our own sin.  Oh, and yes, he really did blank on the place of Christ's birth (bless his heart)!  He forgot his recorder, so this was recorded on his new iPhone SE.

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Homily on the Conception of the Mother of God show art Homily on the Conception of the Mother of God

OrthoAnalytika

Among other things, in this homily Fr. Anthony demonstrates why it is so difficult to preach well on sex (it's hard to say anything useful without saying something that offends liturgical sensibility).

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Homily - Christ loves the Rich Man show art Homily - Christ loves the Rich Man

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Homily on Ephesians 5:18-19 and St Luke 18:18-27.  Christ loved the Rich Young Ruler.  He wasn't manipulating him (e.g. for money or control), but was trying to get him to rise above his feelings and find freedom to that he could enjoy eternal life.

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Homily- Duran Duran, Monty Python, and the Feast show art Homily- Duran Duran, Monty Python, and the Feast

OrthoAnalytika

Homily on Luke 13:10-17.  What does Duran Duran (and Monty Python) have to do with the Feast and evangelism?  In Fr. Anthony's finals-addled mind: it's all part of the pattern. Gospel: St. Luke (14: 16-24).  Then He said to him, “A certain man gave a great supper and invited many, and sent his servant at supper time to say to those who were invited, ‘Come, for all things are now ready.’ But they all with one accord began to make excuses. The first said to him, ‘I have bought a piece of ground, and I must go and see it. I ask you to have me excused.’ And another said,...

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Homily - Bringing Grace to a Messy World show art Homily - Bringing Grace to a Messy World

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St Luke 18:35-43.  The healing of the blind beggar. Three points: Jesus did not stay in one place. Jesus Christ is and was God.  It is fitting that He reside in the throne room of God, surrounded by the cherubim and seraphim, with His holiness reflecting off all the angels and archangels around Him.  But as the being of perfect love, He had to act on behalf of his beloved children (US!).  So He took flesh and became man. Some would have expected Him to take up residence in the Temple or in the Governor’s House.  But instead He lived among common men and women and,...

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Class - Interpreting Nativity Scripture through Hymnography show art Class - Interpreting Nativity Scripture through Hymnography

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Nativity Bible StudySession Two: Interpretation through hymnography Review:  What is the Bible?  What isn’t it? It is NOT the Logos! (St. John 1: 1-18) It is not a complete historical account (St. John 21:25) It is not self evident (Acts 8:26-35) Interpretation is of the Lord, through Christ (Genesis 40: 8; St. Luke 24: 13-32) Like the Ethiopian Eunuch, we need the Church to interpret the Scriptures for us.  The services of the Church are celebratory and poetic interpretations of the events described in Scripture.  Historical narratives speak to the head while musical...

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Talk - Sdn. John Cummings on the 2019 St. Moses the Black Retreat show art Talk - Sdn. John Cummings on the 2019 St. Moses the Black Retreat

OrthoAnalytika

Enjoy the show!

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Our Faith: Orthodox Christianity

Asceticism III: on Mysteries, Love, and Silence

Review.  We have been called to a great purpose.  In Christ it is possible.  We need Him to be saved; we need Him to live the kind of lives we were meant to live.  Lives of meaning and contented peace.  Lives free of spiritual disease.  Christ has the medicine that heals what truly ails us, but we need to have a relationship with Him to receive it. In the case of normal doctors, the mechanisms are things like conversation, prescriptions, and a healing touch. Through these, our relationship with our doctor gives us the opportunity for greater health. Christ is our Great Physician; what does a relationship with Him bring to us? What is the medicine He shares with us? Is it “work” to take the medicine?

  • The Medicine of the Mysteries. This may be the easiest one for us to see.  They look like medicine!
  • The Medicine of Love. This isn’t just the way God heals others, it is how He heals us!
  • The Medicine of Silence. Silent prayer is a test of our spiritual state and, done correctly, can be part of its healing.

We are sick. Our minds have become warped. We confuse our will with God’s and make an idol of our pride. We need to heal our minds. We cannot do this by reading books, even the right ones (although we can certainly make things worse by reading the wrong ones). Nor can we simply “try harder” to be good. Both of these simply act as offerings to our pride, trying to make it stronger so that it can overcome everything else. What we need to do is to quiet that pride and lower the mind to Christ. Hesychasm. God in us. Quiet. Peace. Restores truth and beauty to the center of our lives with the mind in its proper place as the executive of this beauty and truth.

So how do we achieve this peace? First, we have to immerse yourself in the Mysteries of the Church and you have to dedicate yourself to selfless love of and service to your neighbor (to include you spouses, your parents, your children, and even those people who unjustly seek to do you wrong). Next, you have to develop and follow a prayer rule. Spending five-ten minutes each evening and morning in prayer over an extended period of time is a prelude or warm-up for the way of silence.

The problem of thoughts – and the difficulty of finding silence. It’s hard, but you certainly won’t find it if you don’t try! And if you don’t, there is a real risk that the other two modes – being religious and being nice – will become distractions, taking us right back to where we were at the beginning of the story.

Which is why, my dear brothers and sisters, we need to develop the tools to bring peace to our lives and to those around us. “The creation waits with eager longing for the sons of God… because the creation itself will be set free from its bondage and obtain the glorious liberty of the children of God.” (Romans 8:19&21)

“Suppose you read about a pill that you could take once a day to reduce anxiety and increase your contentment. Would you take it? Suppose further that the pill has a great variety of side effects, all of them good: increased self-esteem, empathy, and trust; it even improves memory. Suppose, finally, that the pill is all natural and costs nothing. Now would you take it? The pill exists. It’s called meditation.”~ Jonathan Haidt from The Happiness Hypothesis

How do you meditate?

  • What brings you peace? What quiets your mind?  
  • Meditation (silent prayer) is not just for monks. It is for US!  The ones who need peace.
  • Set yourself up for success.
    • Quiet comfortable place.
    • No distractions (your mind will provide plenty!)
  • Deep breathing. Why?  I use an app to train me for this.
  • Match the words of your prayer to the movement of your breath.
  • Periodically check your shoulders and relax(!)

Don’t get frustrated or upset or worry if you cannot keep focused on these prayers for very long.  If you make this a regular part of your daily ritual, you will train your mind for peace. In times when you are losing your calm, a couple of deep breaths will be enough to bring you back to yourself.

Questions?                                                                   

Next Week: The Rhythms of Life and Worship