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Homily - Prepare to Meet God in His Glory

OrthoAnalytika

Release Date: 12/13/2020

Homily - the Prodigal, his brother, and n-dimensional chess show art Homily - the Prodigal, his brother, and n-dimensional chess

OrthoAnalytika

Homily on the Sunday of the Prodigal Son (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 and Luke 15:11-32).  Both the brothers were limited by their two-dimensional tactical worldview.  The Father shows that grace solves problems that no tactician can.  Enjoy the show!

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Homily - On the Pharisee (and the Antiphons and Little Entrance) show art Homily - On the Pharisee (and the Antiphons and Little Entrance)

OrthoAnalytika

In this homily, given on the Sunday of the Publican and the Pharisee, Fr. Anthony continues to take the parish through the Divine Liturgy.  This week he focuses on the Antiphons and the Little Entrance.  Enjoy the show!

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Homily - Respect Others and Yourself (but not for their/your titles) show art Homily - Respect Others and Yourself (but not for their/your titles)

OrthoAnalytika

Homily given of Zacchaeus Sunday (1 Timothy 4:9-15; Luke 19:1-10).  Fr. Anthony offers a meditation on how love is enabled by cutting through the labels and baggage (i.e. there is a reason God is "not a respecter of persons").  Enjoy the show!

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Homily (DL4) - Why we Sing the Divine Liturgy show art Homily (DL4) - Why we Sing the Divine Liturgy

OrthoAnalytika

In this homily, Fr. Anthony continues his series on the Divine Liturgy, offering a meditation on the benefit of singing the Divine Liturgy (the blessed integration of scripture and poetry, music, voices, incarnation, and Eucharist).  Enjoy the show!

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Fr.Daniel Greeson on the Problem of Discernment show art Fr.Daniel Greeson on the Problem of Discernment

OrthoAnalytika

It was a great blessing to talk with Fr. Daniel Greeson about his new AFR blog, "Every Thought Captive" and especially his series on discernment.  Enjoy the show! Here are my notes: Interview with Fr. Daniel Greeson. Rector of St. Anne’s Orthodox Church in Oakridge, TN Podcaster: “In Heaven and On Earth” Editor and Author of the Ancient Faith Ministry Blog; “Every Thought Captive”   Greeting.  Tell us about yourself and how found yourself wearing a cassock and cross. I love your new blog, Every Thought Captive.  In the introductory post, you use aggressive imagery...

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Homily on Kindness (Colossians 3:12-16) show art Homily on Kindness (Colossians 3:12-16)

OrthoAnalytika

Homily on Colossians 3:12-16. Therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, put on tender mercies, kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering; bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if anyone has a complaint against another; even as Christ forgave you, so you also must do. But above all these things put on love, which is the bond of perfection. And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to which also you were called in one body; and be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual...

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Lessons from the Life of St Anthony the Great show art Lessons from the Life of St Anthony the Great

OrthoAnalytika

This is a recording of Fr Anthony's homily on his name day (1/30, old style), given at Holy Resurrection in Waynesville, NC (the last Divine Liturgy in their tiny starter location!).  Enjoy the show!

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Dylan Pahman on Markets, Morality, and Magic the Gathering show art Dylan Pahman on Markets, Morality, and Magic the Gathering

OrthoAnalytika

After some small talk on the pastoral value of wedding planning, Fr. Anthony and Dylan Pahman (Acton Institute) talk about what Magic the Gathering can teach us about markets and morality and about the general need for economic literacy.  For the last half of the show, they talk about the value of markets, liberal democracy, and international trade, and address some of the objections Christians have about them.  Enjoy the show! 

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Homily - DL3 On the Litanies for Peace show art Homily - DL3 On the Litanies for Peace

OrthoAnalytika

Today Fr. Anthony continues his series of homilies on the Divine Liturgy (offered every other week, when he serves in Anderson).  He explains some of the things the Divine Liturgy does for us and why the Great Litany starts out the way it does.  Enjoy the show!

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Homily - Sunday before Theophany show art Homily - Sunday before Theophany

OrthoAnalytika

Fr. Anthony shares thoughts on the meaning of "The Jordan turned back" and its relevance for us today.  Enjoy the show!

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More Episodes

The Reading from the Epistle of St. Paul to the Colossians. (3:4-11)

Brethren, when Christ, Who is our life, appears, then you also will appear with him in glory.

St. Augustine: But what did he go on to say? “When Christ appears, your life, then you also will appear with him in glory.” So now is the time for groaning, then it will be for rejoicing; now for desiring, then for embracing. What we desire now is not present; but let us not falter in desire; let long, continuous desire be our daily exercise, because the one who made the promise doesn’t cheat us.

Put to death therefore what is earthly in you: fornication, impurity, passion, evil desire, and covetousness, which is idolatry.

St. Athanasius: But the saints, and they who truly practice virtue, “mortify their members” and as the result of this, are pure and without spot, confiding in the promise of our Savior, who said, “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.” These, having become dead to the world, who have renounced the merchandise of the world, gain an honorable death.

St. Jerome: In a general way all that is of the devil is characterized by hatred for God. What is of the devil is idolatry, since all idols are subject to him. Yet Paul elsewhere lays down the law in express terms, saying: “Mortify your members.” Idolatry is not confined to casting incense upon an altar with finger and thumb or to pouring libations of wine out of a cup into a bowl.

On account of these, the wrath of God is coming upon the sons of disobedience. In these you once walked, when you lived in them.

But now put them all away: anger, wrath, malice, slander, and foul talk from your mouth.

Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have put off the old nature with its practices and have put on the new nature, which is being renewed in knowledge after the image of its Creator.

Here there cannot be Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free man, but Christ is all, and in all.

St. John Chrysostom: Now what Paul wishes to say is that there is no benefit in those things, for all those things fall apart, unless they are done with love. This is the love that binds them all together. Whatever good thing it is that you mention, if love be absent, it is nothing, it melts away. The analogy is like a ship; though its rigging be large, yet if it lacks girding ropes, it is of no service. Or it is similar to a house; if there are no tie beams, of what use is the house? Think of a body. Though its bones be large, if it lacks ligaments, the bones cannot support the body. In the same way, whatever good our deeds possess will vanish completely if they lack love.

Patristic quotes:

Gorday, P. (Ed.). (2000). Colossians, 1–2 Thessalonians, 1–2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon (p. 49). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.