loader from loading.io

Karl Rahner

Reformed Forum

Release Date: 12/06/2019

The Call to Worship and Benediction show art The Call to Worship and Benediction

Reformed Forum

Glen Clary speaks about the biblical basis and covenantal context of the call to worship and benediction. These elements of worship are rooted in Christ's work on behalf of his covenant people. In the call to worship, God calls his people to have covenant communion with him in his heavenly temple. He calls us to enter his house—to draw near to him—to have communion with him. The benediction is the bestowal of the covenant blessing by the successful probationer. Had Adam obeyed, he would have received for himself and for all his posterity the covenant blessing. The covenant blessing would...

info_outline
J.I. Packer's J.I. Packer's "Introductory Essay" to John Owen's The Death of Death in the Death of Christ

Reformed Forum

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob reads J. I. Packer's (1926-2020) well known "Introductory Essay" to John Owen's The Death of Death in the Death of Christ as a tribute to this great Anglican theologian.

info_outline
New Course: Introduction to the Theology and Apologetics of Cornelius Van Til show art New Course: Introduction to the Theology and Apologetics of Cornelius Van Til

Reformed Forum

In this episode, we discuss a new online course wherein Dr. Lane G. Tipton teaches a thorough introduction to the theology and innovative apologetic method of Cornelius Van Til (1895–1987), a pioneer in a distinctly Reformed approach to defending the faith. This course investigates the context, structure, and significance of Van Til’s theology and apologetics. It is designed to introduce students to the main influences and fundamental concerns of Van Til’s theological approach to apologetics. Topics include a general introduction, Trinity, image of God, covenant, revelation, worldview,...

info_outline
Covenant Theology in Hebrews show art Covenant Theology in Hebrews

Reformed Forum

Jeremy Boothby speaks about covenant theology through the biblical-theological lens of the book of Hebrews. In so doing, he compares and contrasts 1689 Federalism and other particular baptist approaches to covenant theology with that of confessional Reformed covenant theology. Following the author of the epistle to the Hebrews, Boothby gets to the heart of the difference between particular baptists and Reformed paedobaptists. The matter hinges on the present life-setting of the New Covenant Church in the wilderness. The author of Hebrews compares the church, which is presently in the New...

info_outline
Justification in James show art Justification in James

Reformed Forum

Biblical exegetes have long discussed the relationship of justification in James to that of Paul. On the surface, James 2:24 appears even to contradict many of the key Pauline passages that speak clearly of justification as occurring by grace alone through faith alone in Jesus Christ alone and not by works of the law. In this episode, we discuss the different uses of the words "justification" and "justify" in James, specifically, and in the Bible, generally.

info_outline
The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church - Chapter 4 show art The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church - Chapter 4

Reformed Forum

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues a reading of Geerhardus Vos's 1903 book, The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church. In chapter 4, endeavors to test two opposing views about the kingdom of God to determine whic

info_outline
Vos Group #64 — The Prophets and Monotheism show art Vos Group #64 — The Prophets and Monotheism

Reformed Forum

We turn to pp. 235–238 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the Old Testament prophets and varying views of monotheism.

info_outline
The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church - Chapter 3 show art The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church - Chapter 3

Reformed Forum

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues a reading of Geerhardus Vos's 1903 book, The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church. In chapter 3, Vos discusses the nature of "kingdom" as well as the the difference between the difference between the usage of “kingdom of God” and “kingdom of heaven.” 

info_outline
The Covenant of Works show art The Covenant of Works

Reformed Forum

We discuss the doctrine of the covenant of works, including its biblical basis as well as common objections to it. The Reformed tradition has spoken of the relationship between God and Adam as a covenantal relationship. Without the covenant of works, we cannot rightly understand man’s relationship to God in the garden. Neither can we understand the gospel, for the work of our Lord Jesus Christ was a redeeming work necessitated by the Fall into sin. This is Christ the Center episode 652 (https://www.reformedforum.org/ctc652)

info_outline
The Kingdom of God and Us show art The Kingdom of God and Us

Reformed Forum

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man reflecting on the disciples expectations of the kingdom of God and the change that takes place in them, especially as we see

info_outline
 
More Episodes

Karl Rahner book cover

Jeff Waddington, Glen Clary, and Lane Tipton speak with Camden Bucey about his book, Karl Rahner, and contemporary issues regarding Rahner, modern Roman Catholicism, and contemporary theology.

Arguably the most influential Catholic theologian of the twentieth century, Karl Rahner (1904–1984) developed a theology that has influenced much of post-Vatican II Catholicism and its modern inclusivist approach to missions. 

Despite his impact, little has been written on Rahner from a Reformed perspective. In this introduction and critique, Camden Bucey guides readers to an understanding of Rahner’s theology as a whole. Beginning with Rahner’s trinitarian theology, he moves through each of the traditional departments of theology to show how Rahner developed one basic idea from beginning to end.

Rahner set out to explain how God communicates himself to humanity, whom he created specifically for the purpose of fellowship with him. Once we trace this thread, we gain a deeper understanding of his thought and its reach today.

Buy the Book

Endorsements for the Book 

“If you want to understand present-day Roman Catholicism, you must come to terms with Vatican II (1962–65). Everything that Rome now teaches and does is filtered through it. But if you want to understand Vatican II itself, you need to know about Karl Rahner. . . . Part of the confused and naive attitude of contemporary evangelicals toward Rome depends on the lack of awareness of both Vatican II and Karl Rahner. This lucid book is a helpful introduction to this seminal Roman Catholic theologian whose language contains all the key Christian words (e.g., Trinity, Christ, humanity), but whose meaning is significantly different from that of straightforward biblical teaching. It is time that Reformed theologians do their homework in grasping what is at stake with contemporary Roman Catholicism.”

—Leonardo De Chirico, Pastor, Breccia di Roma; Lecturer, Historical Theology, IFED, Padova, Italy; Director, Reformanda Initiative 

“Roman Catholic apologists often boast about their church’s antiquity but seldom mention modern Roman Catholic theology, which often sounds as modern as liberal Protestantism. Karl Rahner, one of the most influential Roman Catholic theologians of the twentieth century, whose prominence was evident at the Second Vatican Council, is one of the best examples of Roman Catholicism’s modernity. Camden Bucey’s fair-minded and careful assessment of Rahner’s theology is valuable in itself, but doubly so for anyone wanting an introduction to modern Roman Catholicism’s own contribution to liberal Christian theology.”

—D. G. Hart, Distinguished Associate Professor of History, Hillsdale College

“Though Karl Rahner is among the most significant Roman Catholic theologians of the twentieth century, he is little known (and seldom read) by evangelical and Reformed theologians. Camden Bucey’s fine study offers an excellent summary of Rahner’s Trinitarian theology that promises to redress this problem. He not only provides a helpful explanation of Rahner’s well-known Trinitarian axiom (‘the “economic” Trinity is the “immanent” Trinity’), but also locates it within the broader context of Rahner’s anthropocentric theology. While Bucey critically engages Rahner’s theology from a Reformed perspective, he does so throughout in a careful, irenic, and constructive fashion.”

—Cornelis P. Venema, President and Professor of Doctrinal Studies, Mid-America Reformed Seminary

https://vimeo.com/377350960