loader from loading.io

Ep. 74 ‘The Half-Life of Facts’ with Samuel Arbesman

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

Release Date: 12/13/2018

Ep. 112 College social media censorship show art Ep. 112 College social media censorship

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

A new FIRE report finds that 77% of public colleges and universities use a blacklist of secret words to censor comments on their Facebook pages. What’s more, 87% of them block particular users on Facebook or Twitter.

info_outline
Ep. 111 'Dear Colleague,' due process now required. Title IX rules analysis. show art Ep. 111 'Dear Colleague,' due process now required. Title IX rules analysis.

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

On Wednesday, the Department of Education published its long-awaited new Title IX regulations.

info_outline
Ep. 110 The Constitution in the age of coronavirus w/ Prof. Josh Blackman show art Ep. 110 The Constitution in the age of coronavirus w/ Prof. Josh Blackman

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

With much of the country under stay-at-home orders due to COVID-19, what do these orders mean for the five freedoms of the First Amendment?

info_outline
Ep. 109 Censorship pandemic show art Ep. 109 Censorship pandemic

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

For authoritarian leaders across the globe, the coronavirus emergency presents an opportunity to silence critics and consolidate power.

info_outline
Ep. 108 A history of (dis)information wars in the Soviet Union and beyond show art Ep. 108 A history of (dis)information wars in the Soviet Union and beyond

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

How and why do authoritarian regimes seek to control information? On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino is joined by University of Maryland Associate Professor Cynthia L. Martin to explore how one country, the former Soviet Union, restricted access to information and stifled dissent — and what changed when that regime collapsed in 1991.

info_outline
Ep. 107.1 Ep. 107.1 "Coronavirus and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’"

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

"Coronavirus and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’"

info_outline
Ep. 107 FIRE, the coronavirus, and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’ show art Ep. 107 FIRE, the coronavirus, and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino sits down with FIRE President & CEO Greg Lukianoff to discuss how FIRE is adapting to the coronavirus outbreak. We also explore the ideas behind Greg’s new, widely discussed article, “Coronavirus and the failure of the ‘Marketplace of Ideas’.”

info_outline
Ep. 106 ‘Free speech and justified true belief’ w/ prof. Joseph Blocher show art Ep. 106 ‘Free speech and justified true belief’ w/ prof. Joseph Blocher

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, host Nico Perrino speaks with Duke University School of Law professor Joseph Blocher, who argues that one of the most common justifications for free speech — creating a “marketplace of ideas” in our search for truth — rests on unstable ground in our “post-truth” era. In his article, “Free Speech and Justified True Belief,” Blocher argues for a reframing of this epistemic theory of free speech around knowledge, rather than truth.

info_outline
Ep. 105 ‘Rap on Trial’ show art Ep. 105 ‘Rap on Trial’

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

At a time when artistic expression has never enjoyed greater First Amendment protection, rap music has seemingly been left behind. Rap lyrics are routinely used as evidence by police and prosecutors to justify arresting and charging suspects for all manner of alleged crimes.

info_outline
Ep. 104 Violent video games with Villanova Professor Patrick M. Markey show art Ep. 104 Violent video games with Villanova Professor Patrick M. Markey

So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast

Do violent video games make people more violent?

info_outline
 
More Episodes

Has every fact we’ve ever known undergone revision or reversal?

It’s a provocative and consequential idea, and one that complexity scientist Samuel Arbesman argues has some truth to it — even if he wouldn’t state it that strongly. On today’s episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we talk with Arbesman about his 2012 book, The Half-Life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date.

If facts about our world are constantly shifting, shouldn’t the protection of free speech — the right to openly question the world and all we believe about it — become even more critical? We explore what, if any, implications Arbesman’s argument has for those who care about free speech and open inquiry.

Show notes:

“Undiscovered Public Knowledge” by Don R. Swanson

www.sotospeakpodcast.com
Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/freespeechtalk
Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sotospeakpodcast
Email us: sotospeak@thefire.org