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#151 “Bat-motography” and “The Conqueror Bookworm”

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Release Date: 01/21/2021

#153 Greg Patterson tries on the Penguin's #153 Greg Patterson tries on the Penguin's "quack"

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Burgess Meredith put glee and humor into his portrayal of the Penguin. Who knew it could be just as fun to play Meredith playing the Penguin? Greg Patterson, and attorney by trade, has also acted in some one-man shows at in Ohio, playing historical figures including Meredith. He talks to us this time about his Bat-fandom and his portrayals of Meredith and Pengy. Also: , and we look (only as briefly as is warranted) at a 1966 Peter Pan record, , by the Merriettes. SCRIPTS

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Help us snag a JOHN ASTIN interview show art Help us snag a JOHN ASTIN interview

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

We need help procuring an interview with John Astin - we have some questions about his "substitution" as Riddler that we'd like to ask him! But he doesn't do interviews for free, and we're not exactly a major media outlet. Listen for details and, if you've got a few bucks for the cause, donate them by THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2021, at 7 a.m. Eastern Time.

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#152 Defining the Riddler w/Wally Wingert show art #152 Defining the Riddler w/Wally Wingert

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

The Riddler, a one-off villain in a Bill Finger/Dick Sprang comic book story in 1948, languished for nearly two decades until, in 1965, Gardner Fox and Sheldon Moldoff happened to bring him back… just as a certain TV producer, William Dozier, was researching the idea of making a Batman TV show. Riddler ended up in the premiere episode, played by Frank Gorshin, and Gorshin was nominated for an Emmy for the role. Thus was the Riddler cemented as one of Batman’s greatest foes. So the ’66 show is responsible for The Riddler’s prominence, but didn’t it also determine some specifics of...

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#151 “Bat-motography” and “The Conqueror Bookworm” show art #151 “Bat-motography” and “The Conqueror Bookworm”

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

We've looked at Batman: The Movie from a director’s standpoint; this time, we look at it from a cinematographer’s. Howard Schwartz, Director of Photography on that film, called Bat-motography, or Capturing Batman on Film, which not only tells us some of the issues that came up in terms of lighting the film, but also certain scenes in the first season, and plenty of other interesting tidbits. This time, we discuss the article, and also the sixth issue of the Batman ’66 comic book, featuring a (nearly) spot-on take on the Bookworm by Tom Peyer. Also: , a (then) young girl playing surf...

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#150 “The Astrologer”: The Proto-“Zodiac” Script show art #150 “The Astrologer”: The Proto-“Zodiac” Script

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

One of our favorite Batman arcs growing up was the three-parter “The Zodiac Crimes” featuring the mind-blowing combination of Joker and Penguin! But when Stephen Kandel wrote it, it was a two-parter introducing a new villain: The Astrologer. Why might it have been switched to a three-parter starring established villains? How much in the script did Stanford Sherman change when he was asked to rewrite it into what was broadcast? And, can a huge meteorite falling on you cause you to be… burned to death?? We’ll see as we walk through the script! Also, , and about our discussion of...

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#149 Alan Napier: #149 Alan Napier: "Not Just Batman's Butler"

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Alan Napier was the third-billed star of Batman, and is, somewhat remarkably, the only series regular who has a memoir currently in print. The book, Not Just Batman’s Butler, was written by Napier around 1970, and writer James Bigwood has edited and annotated it. At some points, Bigwood has filled in some quite large gaps that Napier left concerning his acting career, as the actor tended to focus more on his personal life. Batman does get a chapter, but it’s among the shortest in the book. So, is it worth the bat-fan’s time to pick up this 356-page tome? We’ve read the book and we try...

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#148 Washburn II: Meet the Stars! show art #148 Washburn II: Meet the Stars!

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

You know about the 1966 Batman at Washburn fan film, made by students at Minneapolis' Washburn High School. (If you missed it, listen to episode 146!) But questions remained unanswered. How did the students get the school to let them shoot the film at school? How did they come up with the idea, and determine the casting? Why did they go with original villains? Why is there no Batcave? And...what's with that funky orange wash on some of the shots? In this episode, we meet some of the stars of the film -- Tim Olson (Batman), Mike Smith (Professor Sin), and Ross Olson (the narrator) -- who fill...

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#147 Stanford Sherman’s letters and Batman ’66 #5 show art #147 Stanford Sherman’s letters and Batman ’66 #5

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Most TV writers don’t become stars. If we’re fans of a show they wrote for, we probably know their names, but nowhere online can we find most writers’ photos or dates of birth, let alone anything about their inner thoughts. Especially not writers who did their work decades ago. Collector Mitch Kaba has come along to help us get some insight into one of the more prolific Bat-writers: Stanford Sherman. Courtesy of Mitch, we have in 1965-66, which include references to some of his early Batman work; in particular, Hizzoner the Penguin. Sherman visited the Bat-set during the shooting of...

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#146 An Early Batman '66 Fan Film, Revealed! show art #146 An Early Batman '66 Fan Film, Revealed!

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Breaking bat-news! The earliest-known Batman ’66 fan film has been revealed! It was made by students at Washburn High School in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in the spring of 1966. As Batmania raged nationally, these kids decided to celebrate their school by making a Batman film in and around their school, with the cooperation of the school, including screen appearances by the principal, Carl W. Anderson, and two teachers! In this episode, we meet collector Mitchell Kaba, who found the film on Goodwill’s auction site and was able to track down many of the students involved in the film -...

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#145 “Batman: The Movie”: What is “the director’s input”? show art #145 “Batman: The Movie”: What is “the director’s input”?

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Director Leslie Martinson, in his TV Academy interview that we explored last time, kept coming back to the question “What is the director’s input” in a TV show or movie? When he pointed out his input to the famous “bomb” scene in Batman: The Movie, we became curious to see what other aspects of the film might show signs of “the director’s input.” So this time, we dig into the script of the Batman ’66 film to see where else Martinson’s fingerprints might turn up. ALSO: The Nostalgia Choir (?) version of the Batman theme, your input on , and D’oh prizes galore for...

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We've looked at Batman: The Movie from a director’s standpoint; this time, we look at it from a cinematographer’s. Howard Schwartz, Director of Photography on that film, published an article in American Cinematographer magazine’s June 1966 issue called Bat-motography, or Capturing Batman on Film, which not only tells us some of the issues that came up in terms of lighting the film, but also certain scenes in the first season, and plenty of other interesting tidbits. This time, we discuss the article, and also the sixth issue of the Batman ’66 comic book, featuring a (nearly) spot-on take on the Bookworm by Tom Peyer.

Also: the Batman theme as played in 2008 by Chicchi, a (then) young girl playing surf guitar; and your mail about our talk with the principals of Batman at Washburn!

Help Tim move away from his cough-inducing apartment

 

Chicchi playing "The Cruel Sea"