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Getting Help with Your Recruiting and Staffing Objectives

Workforce Therapy Files

Release Date: 11/29/2023

Finding Overlooked Candidates to Fill Your Roles show art Finding Overlooked Candidates to Fill Your Roles

Workforce Therapy Files

File 14:  In today’s file, the team discusses ways to overcome workforce gaps by attracting workers from non-traditional sources.  As the needs of your organization evolves, finding enough of the right candidates may be more challenging than it needs to be.  This file will offer some ways for you to identify and engage the marketplace. Jamie begins with a question/comment from a listener who brings up the point that there are more job openings than there are people to fill them in Kentucky (and other states).  In particular, the listener mentioned the metals companies...

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Walking the Tightrope of Talent Attraction show art Walking the Tightrope of Talent Attraction

Workforce Therapy Files

File 13:  In today’s file, the team focuses on the topic of talent attraction.  The environment has evolved and so has the way successful companies plan for success as it relates to recruiting and staffing their organizations.  Remember, there are compliance issues you should consider when promoting your job openings.  Are you ready to compete for your next, new hire? Look How Far We’ve Come Molley begins by describing how a call center she worked for attracted candidates, back in the day.  They posted openings in the Help Wanted section of the newspaper.  The...

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The Importance of Employer Branding show art The Importance of Employer Branding

Workforce Therapy Files

File 12:  In today’s file, the team dives into the importance of employer branding.  How does this fit in to a podcast that’s generally about recruiting, staffing and HR?  Simple.  If you want to attract quality employees, company leaders need to understand how their organization is viewed by the general public.  Is it a brand people want to associate with or are there negative connotations about the organization and its work environment?  If it’s the latter, there’s a direct connection between employer branding and its ability to effectively manage its...

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Breaking Up Is Hard To Do show art Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Workforce Therapy Files

File 11:  In today’s file, the team dives into the topic of terminations.  Breaking up is hard to do, but it doesn’t have to be for either the employee or the manager delivering the news.  The key is to do it with dignity. Molley and Jamie begin with comments about how they’ve been in situations involving a decision to terminate an employee and how stressful the entire situation can be.  In situations involving a lack of performance, the separation should never come as a surprise to that individual.  However, when there are unforeseen layoffs, business closings...

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Recruiting Begins with Retention (Part 3 of 3) show art Recruiting Begins with Retention (Part 3 of 3)

Workforce Therapy Files

File 10:  In today’s file, the team wraps up a 3-part series focusing on how Recruiting Begins with Retention.  The discussion focuses on your employees who have been with you for 3 years and longer.  We’ll refer to them as “The Eddies.”  They are your “Steady-Eddies.” the team discussed those 0-6 month employees (“the Excitables”).  , the focus was on the six-month to 3-year employees (“the Evolvers”). Jamie begins by explaining that the Eddies, in part because of their tenure, are focused on how the organization is operating.  They are the...

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Recruiting Begins with Retention (Part 2 of 3) show art Recruiting Begins with Retention (Part 2 of 3)

Workforce Therapy Files

File 9:  In today’s file, the team continues a 3-part series focusing on how Recruiting Begins with Retention.  The discussion focuses on your employees who have been with you for 6 months to 3 years.  We’ll refer to them as “The Evolvers.” Jamie begins with a quote from Fortune magazine regarding why employees leave during the first 6-12 months.  Some of these reasons can be restated to include:         Feeling out of sync         Not understanding how they impact the company      Realizing their...

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Recruiting Begins with Retention (Part 1 of 3) show art Recruiting Begins with Retention (Part 1 of 3)

Workforce Therapy Files

File 8:  In today’s file, the team begins a 3-part series focusing on how Recruiting Begins with Retention.  The discussion focuses on “The Excitables.”  These are employees who have been with you for 0-6 months.  The needs of this particular group are different, and so are the reasons they may decide to leave. You Only Have One Chance to Make a Positive First Impression Jamie begins by asking, “What was your WORST first day like?”  Jason immediately recalls a summer job he had, during college, on a hog farm.  It was a large farm with 1,000...

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Getting Help with Your Recruiting and Staffing Objectives show art Getting Help with Your Recruiting and Staffing Objectives

Workforce Therapy Files

File 7:  In today’s file, the team focuses on you when it comes to getting help with your recruiting and staffing objectives.  It can feel overwhelming.  It’s often like you’re just climbing uphill without the proper resources.  Jamie begins the discussion by describing why she quit going to conferences, early in her career.  The speakers didn’t really seem to understand or remember what it was like at the ground level.  So, what’s the answer, how do you seek and ask for help? Jason approaches this from a marketing perspective.  Rather than...

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Understanding What the Labor Statistics Indicate show art Understanding What the Labor Statistics Indicate

Workforce Therapy Files

File 6:  In today’s file, the team digests the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers and their impact on recruiting and economic standpoint.  Why are they important and what difference do they actually make?  For reference: Jason begins with a brief explanation.  The monthly jobs report is a combination of narrative and tables intended to help individuals, businesses and other organizations to monitor the labor market.  This information assists in planning, forecasting and modeling for a variety of purposes. In this report, the number of new jobs created was...

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Spooky Recruiting Issues show art Spooky Recruiting Issues

Workforce Therapy Files

File 5:  In today’s file, the team goes with a Halloween theme.  We’ll discussed spooky recruiting issues and situations to avoid.  Ghosting Jamie begins the discussion with the topic of ghosting.  Imagine leading recruiting teams for large organizations.  Suddenly you find yourself laid-off.  You’ve made progress in your job search, but suddenly you realize, nobody is calling you back.  It feels as if you’re being ghosted.  If you’ve every applied for a job, it’s quite possible you’ve been ghosted.  You took the time to go through the...

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File 7:  In today’s file, the team focuses on you when it comes to getting help with your recruiting and staffing objectives.  It can feel overwhelming.  It’s often like you’re just climbing uphill without the proper resources. 

Jamie begins the discussion by describing why she quit going to conferences, early in her career.  The speakers didn’t really seem to understand or remember what it was like at the ground level.  So, what’s the answer, how do you seek and ask for help?

Jason approaches this from a marketing perspective.  Rather than outsourcing this recruiting element, some companies decide to hire “a marketing person.”  Finding an individual who can handle graphic design, website development and management, copywriting, ad builds, interpret analytics and other important activities is usually too much for one person to handle, effectively.  Many of these skills are separate and distinct.  The same example applies to recruiters and talent acquisition professionals.  The scope of the challenge is extremely broad and leadership doesn’t always understand how to properly resource these efforts. 

Asking for Help

This is difficult to consider, especially when you think it’s “just not in the budget.”  The reality is it’s probably there, but you have to dig to find it.  How big of a financial impact does turnover have on the budget?  Jamie and Molly comment that senior management may not actually attribute a dollar amount to this, but the real costs are there.  Most organizations don’t truly understand how much it costs to hire an individual or group of people.

Waste associated with workforce planning, in general, rarely shows up in the budget.  In reality, it may be one of the top expenses to a company, along with the general categories of payroll and benefits.  Companies would do well to begin planning for it. 

The cost of recruiting and hiring has changed.  These expenses should be a dynamic part of the budget.  Simply allocating what you’ve done in the past doesn’t actively consider the increases in these activities, or the actions being taken by your competition.

Jason suggests you consider whether or not your company’s budget has a significant allocation for capital expenditures.  This may be an area from which to secure investment in your workforce development efforts.  There may be some miscellaneous funds that tend to roll over in this ledger, year after year.  There are software tools that can help you to better analyze your workforce planning and the cost of these tools may be less than you anticipated.  The overall savings would definitely yield a return to the company’s bottom line.

The Cost of a Failed Hire

Molley asks new clients to quantify this number.  Unfortunately, many can’t or don’t know where to begin.  She goes on to explain in recruiting, there is a turnover number and a churn number.  There’s a difference.  Churn relates to what happens before the person becomes profitable for the company, in terms of the investment it made in identifying them, recruiting them, hiring them, onboarding them and training them.  These expenses are real.  If the employee leaves before he/she hits that point at which they can operate more independently (i.e. they’re now profitable), it’s churn.  Turnover, by contrast, occurs once the person has become profitable. 

You need to have the numbers to make an effective argument to leadership.  Having an outside expert come in to work the numbers and to formulate and deliver “the story” is a win-win. 

Timing Is Important

For many managers and C-suite leaders, the end of the year is when they really get laser focused on the budget.  The time for asking is now.  If you miss this opportunity, you may be stuck with that decision for the next 12 months.

Jamie recommends you identify the person who is representing the HR budget at the C-suite, for your division.  Share a detailed, line-item version of what your budget should look like.  Prepare them with the rationale and the numbers so they can advocate effectively on your behalf.

Jason and Molley discuss how to both build as strategy for the ask, as well as preparing to defend the questions regarding the ask.  Be prepared to offer specifics related to the deliverables directly resulting from the company’s investment.  It’s always about Return on Investment (ROI).

Know What You Don’t Know

Molley explains this statement.  You have to define where the issues are and why they exist.  This exercise will help to support your argument for increased funding for recruiting and talent acquisition.  Show that the investment will address the issues traditionally leading to the problems.  You have to dig into it and determine the root drivers.  Doing so will enable to you identify “why” you’re asking.  It’s not just a wish-list.

Returning to the core theme of the discussion, you can leverage the tools and expertise of outside resources to help you to build the right strategy.  Some of the initiatives can obviously be handled internally.  Reach out of help as needed.  Find a partner who understands your situation and will provide solutions to specific issues.

That’s where we’ll leave the conversation for today.  Before we close the file, we invite you to reach out to us with questions, suggestions or other comments.  We’d love to hear from you.

Need Help Supporting Your Company’s Recruiting and Staffing Goals?

We’re here to help.  You can contact us via our individual websites, depending on your specific needs or questions:

·      Jamie Swaim, SPHR – www.ParcelKnows.com

·      Molley Ricketts – www.IncipioWorks.com

·      Jason Heflin – www.CrowdSouth.com

We hope you found this file insightful and helpful.  Thank you for listening!